Special Issue "Adsorptive Systems for Heat Transformation and Heat Storage Applications"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Thermal Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Yuri Aristov
Website
Guest Editor
Group of Energy Accumulating Materlas and Processes, Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Novosibirsk, Russia
Interests: chemical kinetics; catalysis; chemical engineering; adsorption for energy conversion; heat storage; heat transformation
Dr. Larissa Gordeeva
Website
Guest Editor
Group of Energy Accumulating Materlas and Processes, Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Novosibirsk, Russia
Interests: adsorptive heat transformation and storage; target oriented synthesis of novel adsorbents; adsorption equilibrium and dynamics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Guest Editors are inviting submissions for a Special Issue of Energies on the subject “Adsorptive Systems for Heat Transformation and Heat Storage Applications". To date, owing to growing living standards, heating and cooling has become one of the biggest energy sectors, which consumes nearly half of global final energy demand—more than either electricity or transport. Adsorptive heat transformation and storage (AHTS) is gaining more and more attention in the scientific community as an emerging, environmentally benign technology utilizing renewable thermal energy sources for heating and cooling. The AHTS is expected to play a crucial role in meeting the increasing heating/cooling demands of the growing population. This Issue aims to give a comprehensive insight into the state-of-the-art in the field of AHTS science and technology with a special focus on the following aspects:

  • The thermodynamics and kinetics of AHTS cycles;
  • Novel working pairs;
  • Advanced cycles;
  • Adsorption equilibrium and dynamics;
  • Adsorbent bed configurations;
  • Heat/mass transfer in adsorber/heat exchanger and evaporator/condenser units;
  • COP and SCP enhancement;
  • Compact adsorbent beds preparation;
  • Testing the feasibility of AHTS cycles;
  • Other related topics.

Prof. Dr. Yuri Aristov
Dr. Larissa Gordeeva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • adsorptive cooling/heating/(heat storage)
  • working pairs, heat and mass transfer
  • novel cycles
  • enhancement of COP and SCP
  • cycle dynamics

Published Papers (16 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
An Aqueous CaCl2 Solution in the Condenser/Evaporator Instead of Pure Water: Application for the New Adsorptive Cycle “Heat from Cold”
Energies 2020, 13(11), 2904; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13112904 - 05 Jun 2020
Abstract
This paper addresses the analysis of the applicability of water as a working fluid for the new adsorptive heat transformation (AHT) cycle "Heat from Cold" (HeCol). The cycle proposed for cold countries operates at the ambient temperature below 0 °C. In this work, [...] Read more.
This paper addresses the analysis of the applicability of water as a working fluid for the new adsorptive heat transformation (AHT) cycle "Heat from Cold" (HeCol). The cycle proposed for cold countries operates at the ambient temperature below 0 °C. In this work, an aqueous solution of calcium chloride is proposed instead of liquid water to prevent the ice formation in the evaporator and condenser. The proposed water-based cycle is compared with the common methanol-based HeCol one in terms of the specific useful heat generated per cycle. The effect of the CaCl2 solution on the cycle boundary pressures and its useful heat is studied both theoretically and experimentally. This approach can be extended to other adsorptive heat transformation cycles working at an evaporator or condenser temperature below 0 °C. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Metal and Carbon Nanotube Additives on the Thermal Diffusivity of a Silica Gel-Based Adsorption Bed
Energies 2020, 13(6), 1391; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13061391 - 17 Mar 2020
Abstract
This article presents a study of the effect of metal particle and carbon nanotube additives on the thermal diffusivity of a silica-gel-based adsorption bed of an adsorption chiller. The structural properties of silica gel and carbon nanotubes were investigated using the volumetric method [...] Read more.
This article presents a study of the effect of metal particle and carbon nanotube additives on the thermal diffusivity of a silica-gel-based adsorption bed of an adsorption chiller. The structural properties of silica gel and carbon nanotubes were investigated using the volumetric method of low-pressure nitrogen adsorption. Thermal characteristic tests of the prepared mixtures based on a silica gel with 5 wt% and 15 wt% of aluminum, copper, or carbon nanotubes were carried out. The obtained results show that all the materials used as additives in blends in this study achieved higher thermal diffusivities in comparison with the thermal diffusivity of the parent silica gel. However, the best effect was observed for the mixture with 15 wt% aluminum. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
New Adsorption Method for Moisture and Heat Exchange in Ventilation Systems in Cold Countries: Concept and Mathematical Simulation
Energies 2020, 13(6), 1386; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13061386 - 16 Mar 2020
Abstract
Due to global climate change and fossil fuel depletion, the rational use of thermal energy has attracted great research interest. Large differences between indoor and outdoor temperatures in cold regions results in huge amounts of heat waste and drop in indoor humidity. Ventireg, [...] Read more.
Due to global climate change and fossil fuel depletion, the rational use of thermal energy has attracted great research interest. Large differences between indoor and outdoor temperatures in cold regions results in huge amounts of heat waste and drop in indoor humidity. Ventireg, an adsorption method, has been often recommended for heat and humidity regeneration in cold countries. In this research work, VentireC, an advanced method employing two thermally coupled adsorbent beds is discussed. It allows the heat released during adsorption of moisture in one adsorber to be transferred to another adsorber to facilitate water desorption. The VentireC approach is comprehensively analysed and described in this paper. A composite adsorbent based on LiCl in silica gel pores, which can exchange up to 0.5 g-H2O/g-sorbent, is selected for VentireC processes under cold Western Siberia conditions. Mathematical simulation of humidity recuperation, employing the selected sorbent with and without thermal coupling, demonstrates the advantages of the VentireC process. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Experimentally Measured Thermal Masses of Adsorption Heat Exchangers
Energies 2020, 13(5), 1150; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13051150 - 03 Mar 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
The thermal masses of components influence the performance of many adsorption heat pump systems. However, typically when experimental adsorption systems are reported, data on thermal mass are missing or incomplete. This work provides original measurements of the thermal masses for experimental sorption heat [...] Read more.
The thermal masses of components influence the performance of many adsorption heat pump systems. However, typically when experimental adsorption systems are reported, data on thermal mass are missing or incomplete. This work provides original measurements of the thermal masses for experimental sorption heat exchanger hardware. Much of this hardware was previously reported in the literature, but without detailed thermal mass data. The data reported in this work are the first values reported in the literature to thoroughly account for all thermal masses, including heat transfer fluid. The impact of thermal mass on system performance is also discussed, with detailed calculation left for future work. The degree to which heat transfer fluid contributes to overall effective thermal mass is also discussed, with detailed calculation left for future work. This work provides a framework for future reporting of experimental thermal masses. The utilization of this framework will enrich the data available for model validation and provide a more thorough accounting of adsorption heat pumps. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Unified Methodology to Identify the Potential Application of Seasonal Sorption Storage Technology
Energies 2020, 13(5), 1037; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13051037 - 26 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
In this study, the definition of a new methodology for a preliminary evaluation of the working boundary conditions under which a seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) system operates is described. The approach starts by considering the building features as well as the reference [...] Read more.
In this study, the definition of a new methodology for a preliminary evaluation of the working boundary conditions under which a seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) system operates is described. The approach starts by considering the building features as well as the reference heating system in terms of solar thermal collectors’ technology, ambient heat sinks/source, and space heating distribution systems employed. Furthermore, it is based on a deep climatic analysis of the place where the STES needs to be installed, to identify both winter and summer operating conditions. In particular, the STES energy density is evaluated considering different space heating demands covered by the STES (ranging from 10% up to 60%). The obtained results demonstrate that this approach allows for the careful estimation of the achievable STES density, which is varies significantly both with the space heating coverage guaranteed by the STES as well as with the ambient heat source/sink that is employed in the system. This confirms the need for careful preliminary analysis to avoid the overestimation of the STES material volume. The proposed approach was then applied for different climatic conditions (e.g., Germany and Sweden) and the volume of one of the most attractive composite sorbent materials reported in the literature, i.e., multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)-LiCl, using water as the working fluid, needed for covering the variable space heating demand in a Nearly Zero Energy Building (NZEB) was calculated. In the case of Swedish buildings, it ranges from about 3.5 m3 when 10% of the space heating demand is provided by the STES, up to 11.1 m3 when 30% of the space heating demand is provided by the STES. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Ammonia/Ethanol Mixture for Adsorption Refrigeration
Energies 2020, 13(4), 983; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13040983 - 22 Feb 2020
Abstract
Adsorption refrigeration has become an attractive technology due to the capability to exploit low-grade thermal energy for cooling power generation and the use of environmentally friendly refrigerants. Traditionally, these systems work with pure fluids such as water, ethanol, methanol, and ammonia. Nevertheless, the [...] Read more.
Adsorption refrigeration has become an attractive technology due to the capability to exploit low-grade thermal energy for cooling power generation and the use of environmentally friendly refrigerants. Traditionally, these systems work with pure fluids such as water, ethanol, methanol, and ammonia. Nevertheless, the operating conditions make their commercialization still unfeasible, especially owing to safety and cost issues as a consequence of the working pressures, which are higher or lower than 1 atm. The present work represents the first thermodynamic insight in the use of mixtures for adsorption refrigeration and aims to assess the performance of a binary system of ammonia and ethanol. According to the Gibbs’ phase rule, the addition of a component introduces an additional degree of freedom, which allows to adjust the pressure of the system varying the composition of the mixture. The refrigeration process was simulated with isothermal- isochoric flash calculations to solve the phase equilibria, described by the Peng-Robinson-Stryjek-Vera (PRSV) equation of state for the vapor and liquid phases and by the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) and the multicomponent potential theory of adsorption (MPTA) for the adsorbed phase. In operating condenser and evaporator, pressure levels around atmospheric pressure can be achieved using an ammonia/ethanol mixture with a mole fraction of ethanol in the range of 0.70−0.75. A good agreement in the predictions of the adsorbed phase composition was also reported using the IAST and the MPTA methods. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Possibility of Calcium Oxide from Natural Limestone Including Impurities for Chemical Heat Pump
Energies 2020, 13(4), 803; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13040803 - 12 Feb 2020
Abstract
Improving energy recycle is an important way to save energy resources and preserve the global environment. Chemical heat pump (CHP) is a technology for saving energy, which utilizes chemical reactions to store thermal energy such as waste heat and solar heat, then release [...] Read more.
Improving energy recycle is an important way to save energy resources and preserve the global environment. Chemical heat pump (CHP) is a technology for saving energy, which utilizes chemical reactions to store thermal energy such as waste heat and solar heat, then release it to provide heat for heating/cooling/refrigeration. For a practical CHP, it is necessary to find cheaper and more stable supply materials. In order to evaluate the possibility of calcium oxide from natural Ofunato natural limestone including impurities, we compare Ofunato limestone with Kawara natural limestone and Garou natural limestone from Japan. These calcium oxides worked as a reactant for CaO/H2O/Ca(OH)2 CHP by repeated hydration/dehydration reaction cycle experiments in a thermogravimetric analyzer. As a result, Ofunato CaO exhibits a high hydration reaction rate after decarbonization at 1223 K for 5 h. The reactivity increased by the repeated hydration reaction although the first hydration rate was low. Furthermore, the sintering of impurities in Ofunato limestone occur easier than that in Kawara limestone with lower impurities. The impurities adhered to the surface of the CaO particle to make specific surface area of CaO particle smaller, which could inhibit hydration reaction of CaO particle. Even if Ofunato limestone contains some impurities, it can be utilized as a raw material for chemical heat pumps. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Non-Condensable Gasses on the Performance of a Vacuum Thermochemical Reactor
Energies 2020, 13(2), 362; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13020362 - 11 Jan 2020
Abstract
A promising heat storage technique is based on thermochemical materials (TCM). Such materials are often used in closed systems under vacuum conditions, which is demonstrated in several projects in the European H2020 R&D programs. In this type of systems, non-condensable gasses (NCG) may [...] Read more.
A promising heat storage technique is based on thermochemical materials (TCM). Such materials are often used in closed systems under vacuum conditions, which is demonstrated in several projects in the European H2020 R&D programs. In this type of systems, non-condensable gasses (NCG) may have a significant effect on the reactor performance. This paper considers the potential effects of NCG on vacuum TCM reactor performance in detail. Water is used as working material to study NCG. Both experiments and numerical simulations show that the effect of NCG cannot be neglected. A small amount of NCG in a vacuum setup will significantly reduce the evaporation/condensation rate. It will transform the transport process from convection-based into diffusion-based in case the pressure of NCG at the condenser surface is equal to the pressure difference between the evaporator/condenser. Designing a stable vacuum storage system, puts high demands on leak tightness of the reactors but also on avoiding NCG release originating from TCM and any used material in the reactor (like coatings and glue). Additional free volume in the reactor will help to reach the demands of stable performance over longer working periods but decreases system energy density, being a crucial KPI. With help of our model, the performance of a system can be determined. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Novel Adsorption Cycle for High-Efficiency Adsorption Heat Pumps and Chillers: Modeling and Simulation Results
Energies 2020, 13(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13010019 - 19 Dec 2019
Abstract
A novel thermodynamic cycle for adsorption heat pumps and chillers is presented. It shows a significant improvement of the internal heat recovery between the adsorption and the desorption half cycle. A stratified thermal storage, which allows for a temperature-based extraction and insertion of [...] Read more.
A novel thermodynamic cycle for adsorption heat pumps and chillers is presented. It shows a significant improvement of the internal heat recovery between the adsorption and the desorption half cycle. A stratified thermal storage, which allows for a temperature-based extraction and insertion of storage fluid, is hydraulically coupled with a single adsorber. The benefit is an increased efficiency by reusing the released heat of adsorption for regeneration of the adsorber and by rendering possible low driving temperature differences. For investigating the second law of this cycle, a dynamic model is employed. The transient behavior of the system and the respective losses because of driving temperature differences at the heat exchangers and losses due to mixing within the storage and to the surroundings are depicted in this one-dimensional model. The model is suitable both for analyzing this advanced cycle as well as for comparisons with other cycles. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
A Statistical Approach to Determine Optimal Models for IUPAC-Classified Adsorption Isotherms
Energies 2019, 12(23), 4565; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12234565 - 29 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Adsorption heat transformation (AHT) systems can play a major role in protecting our environment by decreasing the usage of fossil fuels and utilizing natural and alternative working fluids. The adsorption isotherm is the most important feature in characterizing an AHT system. There are [...] Read more.
Adsorption heat transformation (AHT) systems can play a major role in protecting our environment by decreasing the usage of fossil fuels and utilizing natural and alternative working fluids. The adsorption isotherm is the most important feature in characterizing an AHT system. There are eight types of International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) classified adsorption isotherms for different “adsorbent-adsorbate” pairs with numerous empirical or semi-empirical mathematical models to fit them. Researchers face difficulties in choosing the best isotherm model to describe their experimental findings as there are several models for a single type of adsorption isotherm. This study presents the optimal models for all eight types of isotherms employing several useful statistical approaches such as average error; confidence interval (CI), information criterion (ICs), and proportion tests using bootstrap sampling. Isotherm data of 13 working pairs (which include all eight types of IUPAC isotherms) for AHT applications are extracted from literature and fitted with appropriate models using two error functions. It was found that modified Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) for Type-I(a) and Type-II; Tóth for Type-I(b); GAB for Type-III; Ng et al. model for Type-IV(a) and Type-IV(b); Sun and Chakraborty model for Type-V; and Yahia et al. model for Type-VI are the most appropriate as they ensure less information loss compared to other models. Moreover; the findings are affirmed using selection probability; overall; and pairwise proportion tests. The present findings are important in the rigorous analysis of isotherm data. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
A General Approach in Optimization of Heat Exchangers by Bio-Inspired Artificial Intelligence Methods
Energies 2019, 12(23), 4441; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12234441 - 22 Nov 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
The paper introduces the artificial intelligence (AI) approach as a general method for the design and optimization study of heat exchangers. Genetic Algorithms (GA) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) are applied in the paper. An AGENN model, combining Genetic Algorithms with Artificial Neural [...] Read more.
The paper introduces the artificial intelligence (AI) approach as a general method for the design and optimization study of heat exchangers. Genetic Algorithms (GA) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) are applied in the paper. An AGENN model, combining Genetic Algorithms with Artificial Neural Networks, was developed and validated against the desired data on a large falling film evaporator. A broad range of operating conditions and geometric configurations are considered in the study. Four kinds of tubes are deliberated, including plain and enhanced tubes. Different tube pass arrangements, i.e., top-to-bottom, bottom-to-top, and side-by-side, are discussed. Finally, the effects of liquid refrigerant mass flow rate, as well as the number of flooded tubes on the performance of the evaporator, are analyzed. The total heat transfer rate of the evaporator, predicted by the model, is in good agreement with the desired data; the maximum error is lower than ±3%. The highest heat transfer rate of the evaporator is 1140.01 kW and corresponds to Turbo EHP tubes, and bottom-to-top tubes pass arrangements, which guarantee the best thermal energy conversion. The presented approach can be referred to as a complementary technique in heat exchanger design procedures, besides the common rating and sizing tasks. It is an effective and alternative method for the existing approaches, considering the complexity of analytical and numerical techniques as well as the high costs of experiments. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Modelling the Ammoniation of Barium Chloride for Chemical Heat Transformations
Energies 2019, 12(23), 4404; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12234404 - 20 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The coupling of reversible ammoniation reactions between two salts presents a method for the exploitation of low grade waste heat. This resorption configuration can be used for thermal transformation or heat pumping, to recover waste heat to primary producers, or for integration in [...] Read more.
The coupling of reversible ammoniation reactions between two salts presents a method for the exploitation of low grade waste heat. This resorption configuration can be used for thermal transformation or heat pumping, to recover waste heat to primary producers, or for integration in heat networks. To understand the solid/gas reaction behaviour and to model its kinetics, Large Temperature Jump (LTJ) experiments were performed on a composite of barium chloride in an expanded natural graphite (ENG) matrix. A model has been built using a semi-empirical equation from the literature, which has been validated with the LTJ results. The results suggest the semi-empirical model provides a reasonable prediction for solid/gas reactions once the constants have been identified. Enhancing the model to handle sequential phase change reactions will enable a wide number of salts to be modelled, making the design of a resorption system practicable. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A Double-Bed Adsorptive Heat Transformer for Upgrading Ambient Heat: Design and First Tests
Energies 2019, 12(21), 4037; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12214037 - 23 Oct 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
A full scale lab prototype of an adsorptive heat transformer (AHT), consisting of two adsorbers, an evaporator, and a condenser, was designed and tested in subsequent cycles of heat upgrading. The composite LiCl/SiO2 was used as an adsorbent with methanol as an [...] Read more.
A full scale lab prototype of an adsorptive heat transformer (AHT), consisting of two adsorbers, an evaporator, and a condenser, was designed and tested in subsequent cycles of heat upgrading. The composite LiCl/SiO2 was used as an adsorbent with methanol as an adsorbtive substance under boundary temperatures of TL/TM/TH = −30/20/30 °C. Preliminary experiments demonstrated the feasibility of the tested AHT in continuous heat generation, with specific power output of 520 W/kg over 1–1.5 h steady-state cycling. The formal and experimental thermal efficiency of the tested rig were found to be 0.5 and 0.44, respectively. Although the low potential heat to be upgraded was available for free from a natural source, the electric efficiency of the prototype was found to be as high as 4.4, which demonstrates the promising potential of the “heat from cold” concept. Recommendations for further improvements are also outlined and discussed in this paper. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Experimental Study of Performance Improvement of 3-Bed and 2-Evaporator Adsorption Chiller by Control Optimization
Energies 2019, 12(20), 3943; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12203943 - 17 Oct 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The main challenge facing adsorption cooling technology is low Coefficient of Performance (COP), which becomes a key factor of the commercialization of this technology. This paper presents the results of modifications, aiming to increase COP, applied to the control software [...] Read more.
The main challenge facing adsorption cooling technology is low Coefficient of Performance (COP), which becomes a key factor of the commercialization of this technology. This paper presents the results of modifications, aiming to increase COP, applied to the control software of a prototype three-bed two-evaporator adsorption chiller. Changes were mainly related to the sequence of the switching valves and had no influence on the hardware of the chiller. The sequence changes enabled the introduction of heat recovery and mass regeneration. Moreover, the precooling process was improved. The applied modifications not only resulted in significant improvement of the chiller’s COP, but also improved the cooperation adsorption unit heating source, which is of great importance in case of district heating supply. The improvement was also observed concerning such operational aspects as noise and vibrations. In the authors’ opinion, the presented modifications can be introduced to most exploited adsorption chillers and could potentially lead to similar improvements in performance. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A Novel Passive Method for Regulating Both Air Temperature and Relative Humidity of the Microenvironment in Museum Display Cases
Energies 2019, 12(19), 3768; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12193768 - 02 Oct 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Display cases are widely utilized in museums to build an appropriate microenvironment for artifacts. In this study, a novel passive method is utilized to regulate both the temperature and relative humidity simultaneously of the microenvironment in museum display cases by proposing the concept [...] Read more.
Display cases are widely utilized in museums to build an appropriate microenvironment for artifacts. In this study, a novel passive method is utilized to regulate both the temperature and relative humidity simultaneously of the microenvironment in museum display cases by proposing the concept of composite temperature and humidity control materials (CTHCM), which can be fabricated by combining both phase change material (PCM) and silica gel. The PCM is helpful to reduce the range of air temperature changes caused by melting or solidification processes, while the silica gel is helpful to reduce the range of relative humidity changes caused by adsorption or desorption processes. In this study, a coupled heat and mass transfer model is established to analyze the temperature-regulating and humidity-regulating performance of CTHCM using the software COMSOL Multiphysics. The influences of thermodynamic parameters of materials on temperature-regulating and humidity-regulating performance are also analyzed numerically. Results show that CTHCM is able to regulate the air temperature and relative humidity of the microenvironment in museum display cases effectively. It performs well in temperature-regulating as the phase change latent heat increases, and performs well in humidity-regulating as the water vapor permeability or moisture diffusivity increases. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Predicting Performance of a District Heat Powered Adsorption Chiller by Means of an Artificial Neural Network
Energies 2019, 12(17), 3328; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12173328 - 29 Aug 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
In this paper, the feasibility of a multi-layer artificial neural network to predict both the cooling capacity and the COP of an adsorption chiller working in a real pilot plant is presented. The ANN was trained to accurately predict the performance of the [...] Read more.
In this paper, the feasibility of a multi-layer artificial neural network to predict both the cooling capacity and the COP of an adsorption chiller working in a real pilot plant is presented. The ANN was trained to accurately predict the performance of the device using data acquired over several years of operation. The number of neurons used by the ANN should be selected individually depending on the size of the training base. The optimal number of datasets in a training base is suggested to be 35. The predicted cooling capacity curves for a given adsorption chiller driven by the district heating are presented. Predictions of the artificial neural network used show good correlation with experimental results, with the mean relative deviation as low as 1.36%. The character of the cooling capacity curve is physically accurate, and during normal operation for cooling capacities ≥8 kW, the errors rarely exceed 1%. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop