Special Issue "The Governance of Sustainable Cities and Innovative Transport"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Martin De Jong
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
1. Rotterdam School of Management & Erasmus School of Law, Erasmus University, 3062 PA Rotterdam, Netherlands
2. Institute for Global Public Policy, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
Interests: urban development; eco cities; inclusive cities; smart cities; city branding; public policy; governance; policy transfer
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Rui Mu
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Ganjingzi District, Dalian, China
Interests: public policy; transport planning; local governance; collaborative governance; China
Prof. Araz Taeihagh
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore, 469C Bukit Timah Road, 259772, Singapore
Interests: public policy; socio-technical systems; technology policy and governance of technology; policy design, analysis, and analytics; sustainable development; energy and transport policy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Around the world, much is expected of sustainable urbanization. The idea that comfortable life with all basic amenities and more, that also preserves the environment is simply too alluring to refuse. Concepts such as sustainable cities, eco cities, low carbon cities, intelligent cities, smart cities, resilient cities, knowledge cities and compact cities all respond to this hope, but they offer little more than fairly hazy perspectives. When it comes to urban mobility, this begs the question which modern and innovative options do smart sustainable cities offer for their integrated transport systems? How are they governed and organized, which solutions do they adopt in terms of their infrastructure and rolling stock? What promising technologies and information systems do they utilize now or are they proposing for their future and how do they deal with them? And finally, how truly sustainable, low carbon and ecologically friendly are they and will they be in the coming decades?

It is these and similar questions which a new special issue of ‘Energies’ is aiming to address. An international team of three scholars, Martin de Jong (TU-Delft), Araz Taeihagh (National University of Singapore) and Rui Mu (Dalian University of Technology) invites their peers around the world to contribute high-quality articles on these pertinent topics. They will organize the issue around the urban governance of the following themes: (1) Urban and transport concepts and systems, (2) Innovative technologies and technical solutions, and (3) Innovative and sustainable structures and processes.

Prof. Dr. Martin de Jong
Prof. Araz Taeihagh
Prof. Rui Mu
Guests Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Urban governance

  • Governance of technology

  • Smart eco city, Built environment

  • Transit Oriented Development

  • Low carbon mobility

  • Infrastructure systems

  • Intelligent systems

  • Transport technology

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle
Free-Floating Bike Sharing in Jiangsu: Users’ Behaviors and Influencing Factors
Energies 2018, 11(7), 1664; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11071664 - 26 Jun 2018
Cited by 34
Abstract
In order to explore the factors affecting users’ behaviors in a free-floating bike sharing (FFBS) system in China, a survey was conducted in Jiangsu province, China in 2017, and the travel characteristics of FFBS users were analyzed. A binary logistic model was applied [...] Read more.
In order to explore the factors affecting users’ behaviors in a free-floating bike sharing (FFBS) system in China, a survey was conducted in Jiangsu province, China in 2017, and the travel characteristics of FFBS users were analyzed. A binary logistic model was applied to quantify the impact of various variables regarding residents’ usage preference based on 30401 valid questionnaires. The findings show that (1) FFBS was mainly used for short-distance travel in cities, especially for commuting and schooling, and the time period of travel in FFBS coincided with the rush-hour in urban areas; (2) a higher level of education, a higher daily transportation cost, the convenience of picking up and parking, and the contribution to users’ health could promote the usage of FFBS, while malfunctioning bicycles and limited regulations were major obstacles restricting the development of FFBS; (3) interestingly, people with high-incomes rather than those with low-incomes showed an inclination for FFBS owing to the charge mode. This research provides empirical evidence to facilitate the formulation of urban transportation policies and to improve the management of FFBS for the operators. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Governance of Sustainable Cities and Innovative Transport)
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Open AccessArticle
Piling up or Packaging Policies? An Ex-Post Analysis of Modal Shift in Four Cities
Energies 2018, 11(6), 1400; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11061400 - 30 May 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Recently, there has been wider acknowledgement that sustainable urban mobility will not be triggered by one ‘silver bullet’ policy, or by piling up various policies, but requires a deliberate package of policies. Until recently, studies on policy instrument (or measure) interaction have been [...] Read more.
Recently, there has been wider acknowledgement that sustainable urban mobility will not be triggered by one ‘silver bullet’ policy, or by piling up various policies, but requires a deliberate package of policies. Until recently, studies on policy instrument (or measure) interaction have been primarily ex-ante studies, estimating interactions in the future. However, from an evidence-based policy-making perspective, ex-ante evaluations need to use knowledge gained through ex-post evaluations, a crucial link in the policy cycle. To contribute to the strengthening of this poor link, this paper provides an ex-post analysis of instrument interaction in four northwest European, medium-sized cities: Bruges, Ghent, Jena & Erfurt. By exposing the relationships between the range of mobility policies implemented in relation to modal shift achieved, we offer insight into the crucial difference between ‘piling up policies’ and deliberate policy packages. As such, the paper offers evidence to inform ex-ante analysis for urban mobility policy-making and contributes to policy learning as part of effective governance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Governance of Sustainable Cities and Innovative Transport)
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Open AccessArticle
The Governance of Risks in Ridesharing: A Revelatory Case from Singapore
Energies 2018, 11(5), 1277; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11051277 - 16 May 2018
Cited by 16
Abstract
Recently we have witnessed the worldwide adoption of many different types of innovative technologies, such as crowdsourcing, ridesharing, open and big data, aiming at delivering public services more efficiently and effectively. Among them, ridesharing has received substantial attention from decision-makers around the world. [...] Read more.
Recently we have witnessed the worldwide adoption of many different types of innovative technologies, such as crowdsourcing, ridesharing, open and big data, aiming at delivering public services more efficiently and effectively. Among them, ridesharing has received substantial attention from decision-makers around the world. Because of the multitude of currently understood or potentially unknown risks associated with ridesharing (unemployment, insurance, information privacy, and environmental risk), governments in different countries apply different strategies to address such risks. Some governments prohibit the adoption of ridesharing altogether, while other governments promote it. In this article, we address the question of how risks involved in ridesharing are governed over time. We present an in-depth single case study on Singapore and examine how the Singaporean government has addressed risks in ridesharing over time. The Singaporean government has a strong ambition to become an innovation hub, and many innovative technologies have been adopted and promoted to that end. At the same time, decision-makers in Singapore are reputed for their proactive style of social governance. The example of Singapore can be regarded as a revelatory case study, helping us further to explore governance practices in other countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Governance of Sustainable Cities and Innovative Transport)
Open AccessArticle
Technology and Instrument Constituencies as Agents of Innovation: Sustainability Transitions and the Governance of Urban Transport
Energies 2018, 11(5), 1198; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11051198 - 09 May 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Sustainable urban transport is a complex challenge requiring innovation in technologies, culture, and policies. Given the systemic nature of the issues involved, numerous studies have applied the transitions approach to urban transport. However, relatively weak conceptualization of agency in the transitions literature limits [...] Read more.
Sustainable urban transport is a complex challenge requiring innovation in technologies, culture, and policies. Given the systemic nature of the issues involved, numerous studies have applied the transitions approach to urban transport. However, relatively weak conceptualization of agency in the transitions literature limits the usefulness of this approach for the governance of urban transport. The objective of this study is to contribute to the conceptualization of agency in the multilevel perspective to sustainability transitions. We propose that two types of actors exercise agency to foster innovation: technology constituencies, who promote the adoption of specific technologies by citizens, businesses, or governments; and instrument constituencies, who promote the adoption of specific policy instruments. In focusing predominantly on technological innovation, the transitions literature has generally juxtaposed these constituencies or considered them to be the same. We posit that the two constitute distinct, albeit possibly overlapping, actors and that their relationship(s) help better understand and explain how transitions evolve. We discuss the implications of this distinction for the governance of urban transport and argue that the presence of instrument and technology constituencies, and their relationship(s), should be examined empirically in future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Governance of Sustainable Cities and Innovative Transport)
Open AccessArticle
Transport Demand Management Policy Integration in Chinese Cities: A Proposed Analysis of Its Effects
Energies 2018, 11(5), 1126; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11051126 - 02 May 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Transport demand management (TDM) measures are widely regarded as essential tools to deal with traffic issues. Their effectiveness has been under scrutiny. Packaging of TDM measures has recently received much attention from researchers and governments because it can achieve more complex policy goals [...] Read more.
Transport demand management (TDM) measures are widely regarded as essential tools to deal with traffic issues. Their effectiveness has been under scrutiny. Packaging of TDM measures has recently received much attention from researchers and governments because it can achieve more complex policy goals and resolve the negative effects of single TDM measures. Many studies have examined the concept of policy packaging, the ideal packaging process, and potential barriers at the theoretical level. However, the way TDM packaging as a concept works in a real-world context has received little attention. Additionally, there is little methodology to analyse its characteristics from a dynamic and historical perspective. Therefore, this study provides a methodology for analysing TDM packaging in four dimensions (i.e., density, classification, interaction, and time). These dimensions respectively reveal how many and what kind of TDM measures have been implemented, how they interact in a package, and how these characteristics change over time. We examine this methodology through comparative case studies based on policy document analysis in two Chinese cities, Dalian and Shenzhen, both of which adopt a large number of TDM measures. The results show that this methodology successfully reveals the characteristics of case cities: both tend to put more TDM measures into the transport policy package to deal with traffic issues, but the package in Shenzhen is more integrative than that in Dalian. We also find that with the integration of packaging increasing, transport systems are becoming more sustainable, and Shenzhen performs better in this regard than Dalian. This methodology can be used to analyse policy packaging in broader areas and to examine its influence on transport systems in more case studies in future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Governance of Sustainable Cities and Innovative Transport)
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Open AccessArticle
Autonomous Vehicles for Smart and Sustainable Cities: An In-Depth Exploration of Privacy and Cybersecurity Implications
Energies 2018, 11(5), 1062; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11051062 - 25 Apr 2018
Cited by 27
Abstract
Amidst rapid urban development, sustainable transportation solutions are required to meet the increasing demands for mobility whilst mitigating the potentially negative social, economic, and environmental impacts. This study analyses autonomous vehicles (AVs) as a potential transportation solution for smart and sustainable development. We [...] Read more.
Amidst rapid urban development, sustainable transportation solutions are required to meet the increasing demands for mobility whilst mitigating the potentially negative social, economic, and environmental impacts. This study analyses autonomous vehicles (AVs) as a potential transportation solution for smart and sustainable development. We identified privacy and cybersecurity risks of AVs as crucial to the development of smart and sustainable cities and examined the steps taken by governments around the world to address these risks. We highlight the literature that supports why AVs are essential for smart and sustainable development. We then identify the aspects of privacy and cybersecurity in AVs that are important for smart and sustainable development. Lastly, we review the efforts taken by federal governments in the US, the UK, China, Australia, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, Germany, France, and the EU, and by US state governments to address AV-related privacy and cybersecurity risks in-depth. Overall, the actions taken by governments to address privacy risks are mainly in the form of regulations or voluntary guidelines. To address cybersecurity risks, governments have mostly resorted to regulations that are not specific to AVs and are conducting research and fostering research collaborations with the private sector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Governance of Sustainable Cities and Innovative Transport)
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Open AccessArticle
Spatiotemporal Patterns of Carbon Emissions and Taxi Travel Using GPS Data in Beijing
Energies 2018, 11(3), 500; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11030500 - 27 Feb 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Taxis are significant contributors to carbon dioxide emissions due to their frequent usage, yet current research into taxi carbon emissions is insufficient. Emerging data sources and big data–mining techniques enable analysis of carbon emissions, which contributes to their reduction and the promotion of [...] Read more.
Taxis are significant contributors to carbon dioxide emissions due to their frequent usage, yet current research into taxi carbon emissions is insufficient. Emerging data sources and big data–mining techniques enable analysis of carbon emissions, which contributes to their reduction and the promotion of low-carbon societies. This study uses taxi GPS data to reconstruct taxi trajectories in Beijing. We then use the carbon emission calculation model based on a taxi fuel consumption algorithm and the carbon dioxide emission factor to calculate emissions and apply a visualization method called kernel density analysis to obtain the dynamic spatiotemporal distribution of carbon emissions. Total carbon emissions show substantial temporal variations during the day, with maximum values from 10:00–11:00 (57.53 t), which is seven times the minimum value of 7.43 t (from 03:00–04:00). Carbon emissions per kilometer at the network level are steady throughout the day (0.2 kg/km). The Airport Expressway, Ring Roads, and large intersections within the 5th Ring Road maintain higher carbon emissions than other areas. Spatiotemporal carbon emissions and travel patterns differ between weekdays and weekends, especially during morning rush hours. This research provides critical insights for taxi companies, authorities, and future studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Governance of Sustainable Cities and Innovative Transport)
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Open AccessArticle
A Tale of Two Chinese Transit Metropolises and the Implementation of Their Policies: Shenyang and Dalian (Liaoning Province, China)
Energies 2018, 11(3), 481; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11030481 - 25 Feb 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
To promote sustainable urbanization and combat the economic, environmental, energy and safety issues that go with rapid motorization, the Ministry of Transport in China has introduced the “Transit Metropolis” program with a substantive amount of funds devoted to the implementation of the program [...] Read more.
To promote sustainable urbanization and combat the economic, environmental, energy and safety issues that go with rapid motorization, the Ministry of Transport in China has introduced the “Transit Metropolis” program with a substantive amount of funds devoted to the implementation of the program in local governments. This represents the largest ever central government-led effort addressing transit metropolis development in the world. How has the program been implemented locally? Have the selected demonstration cities followed the same principle or taken comparable measures to implement their version of the transit metropolis? What is their performance? These questions remain unknown in the current literature. This article answers the above questions through a literature review, interviews and comparative case studies in Shenyang and Dalian, two large cities in Liaoning Province. It shows that both cities have successfully achieved the target levels for building a transit metropolis. Similarities between the two cities can be found their absence of any policies on automobile restriction and the presence of enormous efforts in transit network expansion and optimization. Differences lie in the fact that Shenyang has been more conventional in developing the transit metropolis, while Dalian has been more innovative and flexible in policy implementation. When comparing our empirical findings with the experience of creating transit metropolis elsewhere in China and in foreign countries, we find that policies and regulations restricting car use and calming traffic are not necessary conditions for successful transit metropolises; however, the attractiveness of transit infrastructure, combined with aesthetic and well-decorated street network is essential for a modal shift for transit. We also find that the perception on the transit metropolis in China more emphasizes transit service improvement, while the concept in Western countries more focuses on the shift of land use patterns that lean more towards influencing transit behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Governance of Sustainable Cities and Innovative Transport)
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