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Integrated Solar Thermal Systems II

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "A2: Solar Energy and Photovoltaic Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2023) | Viewed by 2672

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, P.le Tecchio 80, Naples, Italy
Interests: advanced energy system; solar heating and cooling; combined heat and power (CHP); energy efficiency; renewable energy; energy policy; geothermal energy; biomass and waste-to-energy systems
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Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples, Italy
Interests: fuel cells; advanced optimization techniques; solar thermal systems; concentrating photovoltaic/thermal photovoltaic systems; energy saving in buildings; solar heating and cooling; organic Rankine cycles; geothermal energy; dynamic simulations of energy systems; renewable polygeneration systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples, Italy
Interests: smart energy networks; sustainable mobility; electric vehicles fed by renewables; polygeneration plants; district heating/cooling networks (4th and 5th gen); cogeneration/trigeneration; electric energy storage systems; energy storage systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are glad to share the great success of our Special Issue “Integrated Solar Thermal Systems”.

We now seek to launch the second volume of this Special Issue “Integrated Solar Thermal Systems II".

Solar energy plays a crucial role in the transition currently underway towards a fully renewable energy system. Solar energy can be converted into numerous kinds of secondary energy: electrical, hot, and cool. In recent years, solar electric technologies have undergone tremendous development, causing a dramatic decrease of their capital cost. On the other hand, a big effort is still required in order to achieve similar results for solar thermal systems. Such devices convert solar radiation into thermal energy by means of a heat transfer fluid (air, water, or others). In general, they are adopted for various purposes: production of domestic hot water, space heating or cooling, drying/heating of agricultural products, thermal desalination, etc. However, their efficiency and their economic profitability must be further improved in order to achieve massive commercialization. In this framework, the integration of solar systems into different technologies is extremely promising and attractive. In particular, solar thermal collectors can be easily integrated with thermal energy storages (sensible and latent heat storage), absorption and compression heat pumps (solar assisted heat pumps), water desalination plants, and thermal power plants. The integration of solar thermal systems with other renewable energy sources (geothermal, biomass, wind, etc.), but also with conventional technologies, based on the use of fossil fuels, represents a further interesting solution to improve the exploitation of renewable energy sources, mitigating the typical fluctuations of solar systems and dramatically improving their profitability. Such integrated systems can also provide important benefits on the path towards zero or nearly zero energy buildings, especially in case of building-integrated solar technologies (BIST).

This Special Issue is focused on the most recent advances in the integration of solar thermal systems with other technologies, and aims to address the newest and most promising developments of such systems.

Prof. Dr. Massimo Dentice D'Accadia
Dr. Maria Vicidomini
Prof. Dr. Francesco Calise
Dr. Francesco Liberato Cappiello
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • renewable energy sources
  • polygeneration systems
  • solar-assisted heat pumps
  • solar heating and cooling
  • building integrated solar technologies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 2532 KiB  
Communication
Solar Disc Concentrator: Material Selection for the Receiver
by Margherita Perrero and Davide Papurello
Energies 2023, 16(19), 6870; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16196870 - 28 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 624
Abstract
Solar concentration is the ability to harness solar radiation in order to increase the temperature of a receiver. The receiver is a component into which a heat transfer fluid can flow in an ORC system, which produces electricity, or it can be used [...] Read more.
Solar concentration is the ability to harness solar radiation in order to increase the temperature of a receiver. The receiver is a component into which a heat transfer fluid can flow in an ORC system, which produces electricity, or it can be used for high-temperature thermal storage or even to implement thermochemical cycles. The choice of material is critical to ensure optimal performance and long-lasting operation. It is also essential that such material can operate at high temperatures and high thermal gradients. In short, material identification involves high thermal stresses that result in structural deformation. Different metal alloys were used to verify that the yield strength limit was not exceeded due to thermal stress induced by concentrated solar radiation. Starting with the general heat equation, the problem was implemented in Matlab. The purpose was to test whether thermal stress exceeds the yield strength, which is the condition in which elastic bonds in the material are changed, causing deformation. This condition, if exceeded, is sufficient to discard the material; otherwise, it is a necessary but not sufficient condition to resist over time. The best material identified was Inconel 740H, which had a high yield strength value and the lowest temperature difference. Under extreme working conditions, it withstood induced thermal shocks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Solar Thermal Systems II)
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Review

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34 pages, 6183 KiB  
Review
A Review of Using Solar Energy for Cooling Systems: Applications, Challenges, and Effects
by Farhan Lafta Rashid, Muhammad Asmail Eleiwi, Hayder I. Mohammed, Arman Ameen and Shabbir Ahmad
Energies 2023, 16(24), 8075; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16248075 - 15 Dec 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1597
Abstract
Energy security refers to a country’s capacity to provide the energy resources essential to its wellbeing, including a reliable supply at an affordable costs. Economic growth and development cannot occur without access to reliable energy sources. Energy availability is a proxy for a [...] Read more.
Energy security refers to a country’s capacity to provide the energy resources essential to its wellbeing, including a reliable supply at an affordable costs. Economic growth and development cannot occur without access to reliable energy sources. Energy availability is a proxy for a country’s standard of living and a key factor in its economic development and technical progress. Solar power is the most reliable and cost-effective option when it comes to meeting the world’s energy needs. Solar-powered cooling systems are one example of how solar energy may be used in the real world. Solar-powered air conditioners have become more popular in recent years. The problems caused by our reliance on fossil fuels may be surmounted with the help of solar cooling systems that use solar collectors. Solar cooling systems may utilize low-grade solar energy, making them popular in the construction industry. Solar cooling systems powered by photovoltaic–thermal (PVT) collectors have been the subject of much research to improve the thermodynamic and economic performance of solar cooling systems. This research focuses on exploring the potential of solar-generated heat for use in cooling systems. This study will also examine the current challenges involved with using solar energy in cooling applications, as well as the possible benefits that may help pave the way for more research and greater employment of heat gain from the solar system in various cooling applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Solar Thermal Systems II)
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