Advanced Magnetic and Electrical Characterization Techniques

A special issue of Electronics (ISSN 2079-9292). This special issue belongs to the section "Electronic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2022) | Viewed by 7837

Special Issue Editors

Department of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics, Transilvania University of Brasov, Eroilor 29 Blvd, 500036 Brașov, Romania
Interests: magnetic characterization techniques; low level signal processing; electrical characterization techniques; spintronic structures; galvanomagnetic effects; magnetic nanoparticles detection; micromagnetic simulations

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Guest Editor
Department of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics, Transilvania University of Brasov, Eroilor 29 Blvd, 500036 Brașov, Romania
Interests: investigation of magnetic properties of materials at high and low temperatures, magnetoresistance and magnetocaloric effect characterization; preparation and investigation of nanomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The emerging field of new phenomena and new materials requires highly sensitive, accurate, and non-invasive magnetic and electrical characterization techniques to investigate structures and devices at micro- and nanoscale. In addition to classical magnetic investigation methods, such as vibrating sample magnetometer, fluxgate, MOKE, or superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), used to measure extremely subtle magnetic fields, there is also magnetic force microscopy or scanning probe Hall microscopy for high-resolution quantitative magnetic field mapping measurements at the micrometer down to nanometer scale. The planar Hall Effect and spin Hall Effect are now widely used to characterize magnetic reversal processes, domain wall dynamics, spin transfer torque, or spin–orbit torque in spintronic structures.

Graphene layers and carbon nanotubes have outstanding properties waiting to be investigated in a broad range of temperatures and electric and magnetic fields. Capacitance–voltage (CV) profiling, admittance spectroscopy (AS), deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), drive-level capacitance profiling (DLCP), photocapacitance, and many other techniques are used to characterize thin-film solar cells. Numerical simulation methods are used to complete and explain the results obtained through experiments.

The enumeration of these investigation techniques is not stopping here and is open to new and innovative ones that are waiting to be presented in this Special Issue.

This Special Issue aims to publish original contributions on cutting-edge experimental techniques and numerical simulation methods used to characterize micro- and nanoscale structures and devices from both a magnetic and electrical point of view. This way, the Special Issue can become a valuable dissemination platform and source of scientific information for researchers and engineers that are using such characterization techniques.

Dr. Marius Volmer
Dr. Adrian Bezergheanu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Electronics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • magnetic characterization techniques
  • electrical characterization techniques
  • DC and AC magnetometry
  • magnetic force microscopy
  • characterization of magnetic nanostructures
  • numerical simulations
  • Hall effect magnetometry
  • electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
  • capacitance spectroscopy
  • lab on a chip

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

25 pages, 7639 KiB  
Article
Designing a Spintronic Based Magnetoresistive Bridge Sensor for Current Measurement and Low Field Sensing
by Cristian Mușuroi, Marius Volmer, Mihai Oproiu, Jenica Neamtu and Elena Helerea
Electronics 2022, 11(23), 3888; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics11233888 - 24 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1540
Abstract
An exchanged-biased anisotropic magnetoresistance bridge sensor for low currents measurement is designed and implemented. The sensor has a simple construction (single mask) and is based on results from micromagnetic simulations. For increasing the sensitivity of the sensor, the magnetic field generated by the [...] Read more.
An exchanged-biased anisotropic magnetoresistance bridge sensor for low currents measurement is designed and implemented. The sensor has a simple construction (single mask) and is based on results from micromagnetic simulations. For increasing the sensitivity of the sensor, the magnetic field generated by the measurement current passing through the printed circuit board trace is determined through an analytical method and, for comparative analysis, finite elements method simulations are used. The sensor performance is experimentally tested with a demonstrator chip. Four case studies are considered in the analytical method: neglecting the thickness of the trace, dividing the thickness of the trace in several layers, and assuming a finite or very long conductive trace. Additionally, the influence of several adjacent traces in the sensor area is evaluated. The study shows that the analytical design method can be used for optimizing the geometric selectivity of a non-contacting magnetoresistive bridge sensor setup in single trace, differential, and multi-trace (planar coil) configurations. Further, the results can be applied for developing highly performant magnetoresistance sensors and optimizations for low field detection, small dimensions, and low costs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Magnetic and Electrical Characterization Techniques)
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9 pages, 4585 KiB  
Article
Calculation Methodologies of Complex Permeability for Various Magnetic Materials
by Eun S. Lee and Byeong Guk Choi
Electronics 2021, 10(17), 2167; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics10172167 - 5 Sep 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 5338
Abstract
In order to design power converters and wireless power systems using high-frequency magnetic materials, the magnetic characteristics for the inductors and transformers should be specified in detail w.r.t. the operating frequency. For investigating the complex permeability of the magnetic materials by simply test [...] Read more.
In order to design power converters and wireless power systems using high-frequency magnetic materials, the magnetic characteristics for the inductors and transformers should be specified in detail w.r.t. the operating frequency. For investigating the complex permeability of the magnetic materials by simply test prototypes, the inductor model-based calculation methodologies for the complex permeability are suggested to find the core loss characteristics in this paper. Based on the measured results of the test voltage Ve, current Ie, and phase difference θe, which can be obtained simply by an oscilloscope and a function generator, the real and imaginary permeability can be calculated w.r.t. operating frequency by the suggested calculation methodologies. Such information for the real and imaginary permeability is important to determine the size of the magnetic components and to analyze the core loss. To identify the superiority of the high-frequency magnetic materials, three prototypes for a ferrite core, amorphous core, and nanocrystalline core have been built and verified by experiment. As a result, the ferrite core is superior to the other cores for core loss, and the nanocrystalline core is recommended for compact transformer applications. The proposed calculation for the complex (i.e., real and imaginary) permeability, which has not been revealed in the datasheets, provides a way to easily determine the parameters useful for industrial electronics engineers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Magnetic and Electrical Characterization Techniques)
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