Cares in the Age of Communication: Health Education and Healthy Lifestyles

A special issue of European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education (ISSN 2254-9625).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020) | Viewed by 51514

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The University School of Nursing and Physiotherapy, Universidad Pontificia Comillas, 28015 Madrid, Spain
Interests: clinical research and evidence-based practice; clinical trials; wellbeing; palliative care; coping strategies; patient and professional engagement; clinical nursing; nursing education; advanced practice nursing; community cares
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Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, the power of social media to share information and connect with others is a reality that has also changed the way people communicate about health information. For instance, sometimes, individuals may not automatically accept the advice of health experts, such as psychologists, nutritionists, nurses or doctors among others, and instead look at what their peers are saying about health issues.

The loss of confidence in health professionals could be dangerous with regard to the diffusion of information about community health and possible alterations of procedures and systems designed to maintain and improve it. So, this situation about the Spreading health education through Social Media requires research and the design of new ways to approach social media users, especially, young people. Initiatives where health professionals must be the main actors and drive the communication initiatives focused on community health with the main goal of recovery the people confidence when they in health issues. Health education has an important challenge in front of all healthcare providers in multiple aspects of caring. Patients and people concerns about self-cares must be addressed and every one of us is an agent for change.

This Special Issue aims to present and foster the research developed by health professionals in relation to the promotion of health and healthy lifestyles through adequate communication strategies.

We accept original research papers, research briefs, and reviews.

Dr. Ivan Herrera-Peco
Dr. Julio C. de la Torre-Montero
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • communication
  • health education
  • health promotion
  • health professions
  • lifestyle
  • research
  • public health
  • social media

Published Papers (11 papers)

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Editorial

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4 pages, 245 KiB  
Editorial
Preface of Special Issue “Cares in the Age of Communication: Health Education and Healthy Lifestyles”: Social Media and Health Communication in a Pandemic?
by Iván Herrera-Peco and Julio C. de la Torre-Montero
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2020, 10(2), 575-578; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe10020042 - 10 Apr 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3557
Abstract
In the midst and the mist of the Covid-19 outbreak, we are living in the age of global communication in a hyperconnected society in which the transmissions channels between people have been changed very clearly due to both the internet itself in general [...] Read more.
In the midst and the mist of the Covid-19 outbreak, we are living in the age of global communication in a hyperconnected society in which the transmissions channels between people have been changed very clearly due to both the internet itself in general and social networks in particular [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

18 pages, 283 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Quality of Physical Environments of Early Childhood Schools within the Cape Coast Metropolis in Ghana Using a Sequential Explanatory Mixed-Methods Design
by Salome Amissah-Essel, John Elvis Hagan, Jr. and Thomas Schack
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2020, 10(4), 1158-1175; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe10040081 - 18 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3487
Abstract
(1) Background: The last few decades have seen researchers giving considerable attention to the physical context of early childhood care and development (ECCD) centers because many of the underlying processes that link physical context are quite similar to psychosocial environmental factors regarding child [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The last few decades have seen researchers giving considerable attention to the physical context of early childhood care and development (ECCD) centers because many of the underlying processes that link physical context are quite similar to psychosocial environmental factors regarding child development. However, research on the physical environments, and the employees’ understanding of the importance of physical environments, is often underestimated. The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of the physical environments of ECCD centers in the Cape Coast Metropolis, Ghana, and ascertain whether being a private or public center (center auspices) would be associated with the quality of its physical environment. A further inquiry into the educators’ understanding of the importance of physical environment on children’s developmental outcomes was made. (2) Methods: Using a sequential explanatory mixed-methods research design, all 160 ECCD centers in the Cape Coast Metropolis were assessed using a modified version of the Children’s Physical Environment Rating Scale (CPERS) and a semi-structured interview guide. (3) Results: Descriptive statistics indicated that more than half of the ECCD centers, 56%, rated “fair” on the quality of their physical environment. Although the locations and sites of these centers were of good quality, other physical environmental characteristics (i.e., “Planning of the Centre”, “Building as a Whole” and “Outdoor Space”) of ECCD centers were also rated to be fair. A Chi-square test showed that center auspices (i.e., being private or public) were not significantly associated with the quality of the physical environments of the centers [χ2(2) = 2.490, p > 0.05], suggesting no significant difference between private and public ECCD centers in terms of the quality of their physical environment. A follow-up qualitative inquiry identified two themes as reasons why play yards in early years’ schools were not good: a ‘‘lack of funding” and “governmental support”. (4) Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the physical environments of ECCD centers are, to some extent, compromised. Stakeholders (e.g., Ghana Education Service, non-governmental/religious organizations, and private entrepreneurs) should help improve the quality of physical environments and also provide financial assistance for the provision of basic equipment (e.g., learning materials) for private and public ECCD centers in the Cape Coast Metropolis. Educators require in-service training to boost their in-depth understanding of the importance of physical environments on children’s developmental outcomes. Future studies could target children’s perceptions of their preschools’ physical environments as useful empirical information to help guide appropriate policy interventions. Full article
15 pages, 329 KiB  
Article
The English Version of the Health Profession Communication Collective Efficacy Scale (HPCCE Scale) by Capone and Petrillo, 2012
by Vincenza Capone, Leda Marino and Anna Rosa Donizzetti
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2020, 10(4), 1065-1079; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe10040075 - 13 Nov 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3642
Abstract
Communication is a crucial component in all steps of the health care process. Therefore, it is important to have knowledge about the communication skills of the whole health organization. From the socio-cognitive perspective, collective efficacy beliefs are the main indicators of the capacity [...] Read more.
Communication is a crucial component in all steps of the health care process. Therefore, it is important to have knowledge about the communication skills of the whole health organization. From the socio-cognitive perspective, collective efficacy beliefs are the main indicators of the capacity of functioning of the system. This work aimed to contribute to the validation of the English version of Health Profession Communication Collective Efficacy Scale (HPCCE scale) a self-report questionnaire measuring hospital doctors’ beliefs to succeed as a group to meet the needs of internal and external communication and of communication with patients, examining the structure, reliability and convergent validity. This study was a cross-sectional investigation conducted using snowball sampling. The participants were 287 doctors working at different hospitals in UK. Explorative factor analyses and Rasch analysis confirmed the one-factor solution. Results revealed high internal reliability. The HPCCE scale correlated positively with Social Self-Efficacy. The English version of HPCCE is a valid instrument to measure communication efficacy beliefs in hospital, involving different type of doctors. It can contribute to the implementation and evaluation of management interventions in a health organization aimed at its optimization. Full article
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16 pages, 482 KiB  
Article
Characteristics of Academic Adaptation and Subjective Well-Being in University Students with Chronic Diseases
by Rail M. Shamionov, Marina V. Grigoryeva, Elena S. Grinina and Aleksey V. Sozonnik
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2020, 10(3), 816-831; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe10030059 - 20 Aug 2020
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 5308
Abstract
Studying academic adaptation and subjective well-being in students with chronic diseases can help to explain psychological compensatory mechanisms and help with the development of socio-psychological support programs. It is supposed that the defining role is played by general adaptive potential, and the presence [...] Read more.
Studying academic adaptation and subjective well-being in students with chronic diseases can help to explain psychological compensatory mechanisms and help with the development of socio-psychological support programs. It is supposed that the defining role is played by general adaptive potential, and the presence of chronic diseases results in variations in academic adaptation, which, alongside other variables, acts as a predictor of subjective well-being and satisfaction of basic needs. The sample consisted of first-year university students aged 17–26 years (mean = 19.6, SD = 2.8, 18.4% male; n = 419 persons, of which 34.8% with chronic diseases of various etiologies). To evaluate the components of students’ academic adaptation, we used the Academic Adaptation Scale; general adaptive potential was measured using the Multilevel Personal Adaptability Questionnaire; to evaluate subjective well-being, we used the Subjective Well-Being Scale; and satisfaction using the Life Scale. Satisfaction of basic needs was defined with the Basic Needs Satisfaction in General Scale. Students with chronic diseases demonstrated lower manifested adaptive potential, general markers of academic adaptation, subjective well-being, and satisfaction of basic psychological needs. The results showed that interrelations between various markers in students are largely mediated by academic adaptation and adaptive potential. Thus, the interconnection between adaptive potential and satisfaction of basic needs is significantly mediated by students’ academic adaptation, whereas the interconnection between chronic diseases and academic adaptation is mediated by adaptive potential. In other words, the findings support the assumption regarding the significant mediating role of these variables in subjective well-being. Cognitive, motivational, and communicative components of academic adaptation can serve as compensatory factors for experiencing subjective well-being in students with chronic diseases. Full article
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16 pages, 1196 KiB  
Article
A Mobile-Based Tailored Recommendation System for Parents of Children with Overweight or Obesity: A New Tool for Health Care Centers
by Lisa Afonso, Rui Rodrigues, Joana Castro, Nuno Parente, Carina Teixeira, Ana Fraga and Sandra Torres
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2020, 10(3), 779-794; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe10030057 - 7 Aug 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4185
Abstract
Childhood obesity is associated with unbalanced lifestyle patterns, and new strategies are needed to support parents in the compliance with the guidelines for children’s age. Tailored automatic recommendations mimic interpersonal counseling and are promising strategies to be considered for health promotion programs. This [...] Read more.
Childhood obesity is associated with unbalanced lifestyle patterns, and new strategies are needed to support parents in the compliance with the guidelines for children’s age. Tailored automatic recommendations mimic interpersonal counseling and are promising strategies to be considered for health promotion programs. This study aimed to develop and test a mobile recommendation system for parents of preschool children identified with overweight/obesity at health care centers. Evidence-based recommendations related to children’s eating, drinking, moving, and sleeping habits were developed and tested using a questionnaire. A pilot study was conducted in a health care center to test how using an app with those tailored recommendations, in video format, influenced parents’ perceptions of the child’s weight status and their knowledge about the guidelines, compared to a control group. The chi-squared test was used for categorical variables and the Mann–Whitney U test for continuous variables (p < 0.05). A high proportion of parents were already informed about the guidelines, but their children were not meeting them. After watching the tailored recommendations, there was an increased knowledge of the guideline on water intake, but there was no improvement in the perception of the child’s excessive weight. Parents may benefit from a mobile-based tailored recommendation system to improve their knowledge about the guidelines. However, there is a need to work with parents on motivation to manage the child’s weight with additional strategies. Full article
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16 pages, 1577 KiB  
Article
Development and Validation of the Social Network Addiction Scale (SNAddS-6S)
by Esther Cuadrado, Rocío Rojas and Carmen Tabernero
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2020, 10(3), 763-778; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe10030056 - 26 Jul 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 4933
Abstract
The use of social networks has increased exponentially, especially among youth. These tools offer many advantages but also carry some risks such as addiction. This points to the need for a valid multifactorial instrument to measure social network addiction, focusing on the core [...] Read more.
The use of social networks has increased exponentially, especially among youth. These tools offer many advantages but also carry some risks such as addiction. This points to the need for a valid multifactorial instrument to measure social network addiction, focusing on the core components of addiction that can serve researchers and practitioners. This study set out to validate a reliable multidimensional social network addiction scale based on the six core components of addiction (SNAddS-6S) by using and adapting the Bergen Facebook Addiction Scale. A total of 369 users of social networks completed a questionnaire. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed, and different competing models were explored. The external validity of the scale was tested across its relations with different measures. Evidence for the validity and reliability of both the multidimensional SNAddS-6S and the unidimensional Short SNAddS-6S was provided. The SNAddS-6S was composed of 18 items and five different factors (time-management, mood modification, relapse, withdrawal, and conflict), with the time-management factor as a higher-order factor integrated by salience and tolerance as sub-factors. The Short SNAddS-6S was composed of six items and a unifactorial structure. This scale could be of relevance for researchers and practitioners to assess the extent to which individuals suffer from social network addiction and to study the potential predictors and risks of such addiction. Full article
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16 pages, 1611 KiB  
Article
Knowledge in Transition in Healthcare
by Maria José Sousa, Francesca Dal Mas, Alexeis Garcia-Perez and Lorenzo Cobianchi
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2020, 10(3), 733-748; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe10030054 - 17 Jul 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3392
Abstract
Organizations are challenged by the need to transform Dynamic Knowledge, embedded in each worker, into Static Knowledge, rooted in factual documental information. However, innovation and knowledge creation seem to be facilitated by the personal knowledge and life experiences of people, which appear to [...] Read more.
Organizations are challenged by the need to transform Dynamic Knowledge, embedded in each worker, into Static Knowledge, rooted in factual documental information. However, innovation and knowledge creation seem to be facilitated by the personal knowledge and life experiences of people, which appear to be dynamic. The tensions between Dynamic and Static Knowledge in facilitating the transfer and sharing of knowledge arise as compelling research as well as practical topic for organizations. Our paper aims to investigate such tensions by employing a case study. We decided to deepen such dynamics in the healthcare field, given its importance for business and society. In more detail, we analyzed one Emergency Room (ER) department through a series of interviews. Our findings highlight the importance of the right balance between Static and Dynamic Knowledge. On the one hand, the healthcare organization recognized the need to incorporate knowledge into practical and tangible instruments. On the other hand, the flows of Dynamic Knowledge must be fostered through a culture of knowledge translation and sharing, and the development of soft skills. Full article
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13 pages, 1178 KiB  
Article
Effectiveness of Educational Practices in University Students’ Knowledge about Sun Protection and Its Relation to Sunlight Exposure: An Exploratory Study in a Portuguese Higher Education Institution
by Bárbara Roque Ferreira, João Simões and Maria Eduarda Ferreira
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2020, 10(3), 720-732; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe10030053 - 15 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3197
Abstract
Nowadays, there is worldwide recognition that health and educational outcomes are inextricably linked. It is also recognized that health education comprises opportunities to improve health literacy, including the improvement of knowledge and the development of life skills to promote individual health. It is [...] Read more.
Nowadays, there is worldwide recognition that health and educational outcomes are inextricably linked. It is also recognized that health education comprises opportunities to improve health literacy, including the improvement of knowledge and the development of life skills to promote individual health. It is also known that the behavioral practices regarding sun exposure are an important risk factor for skin cancer. Research is needed in this area to understand the contribution of the “Education for Health” curricular unit to these issues. Our exploratory research sought to collect information about the knowledge and practices regarding sun exposure of a group of Portuguese university students who have already attended this curricular unit. The results indicate that the participants show that, notwithstanding that they have already attended this curricular unit, they do not have more literacy on skin health, do not perceive that sun exposure habits are related to skin health and do not perceive that photoprotection constitutes prevention of skin cancer. The results support the need to promote the necessary reflection and debate on the way in which health education should be taught, as well as what is taught, in order to empower students to get decision-making skills associated with the adoption of healthier attitudes and practices, thus helping to prevent skin cancer. Full article
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13 pages, 561 KiB  
Article
Traversing the Funambulist’s Fine Line between Nursing and Male Identity: A Systematic Review of the Factors that Influence Men as They Seek to Navigate the Nursing Profession
by Daniel Terry, Blake Peck, Clarissa Carden, Alicia J. Perkins and Andrew Smith
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2020, 10(3), 691-703; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe10030051 - 5 Jul 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 10967
Abstract
Nursing has seen a dominance of women within the profession, and today, the presence of men in the role remains less understood and appreciated. Males considering or entering nursing face challenges concerning role misconception, marginalization, and gender bias. With a looming shortage of [...] Read more.
Nursing has seen a dominance of women within the profession, and today, the presence of men in the role remains less understood and appreciated. Males considering or entering nursing face challenges concerning role misconception, marginalization, and gender bias. With a looming shortage of nurses on the horizon, it is more important now than ever before to find better ways of engaging males into nursing. The aim of the study was to examine the psychological constructs that influence male perceptions of nursing as they seek to navigate the profession, and what aspects influence men to consider nursing as a career. To achieve this, a systematic review and mixed research synthesis (integrated design) was conducted. English language research published between 1999 and 2019 was eligible. The methodological rigor of qualitative articles followed the Critical Appraisal Skills Program, while the Best Evidence Medical Education guided the quantitative review. Among the 24 publications identified, three sub-themes emerged from the overarching theme of the funambulist or tightrope walker. Sub-themes included societal, inner and collective voices that inform men’s place in nursing or their decision making about entering the profession. There is a need to re-visit what it means to be a nurse in order to address the gendered stereotypes that impact men entering the nursing profession. Full article
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13 pages, 257 KiB  
Article
Concrete Messages Increase Healthy Eating Preferences
by Emily Balcetis, Madhumitha Manivannan and E. Blair Cox
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2020, 10(2), 669-681; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe10020049 - 18 Jun 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4019
Abstract
Public health campaigns utilize messaging to encourage healthy eating. The present experimental study investigated the impact of three components of health messages on preferences for healthy foods. We exposed 1676 online, American study participants to messages that described the gains associated with eating [...] Read more.
Public health campaigns utilize messaging to encourage healthy eating. The present experimental study investigated the impact of three components of health messages on preferences for healthy foods. We exposed 1676 online, American study participants to messages that described the gains associated with eating healthy foods or the costs associated with not eating healthy foods. Messages also manipulated the degree to which they included abstract and concrete language and the temporal distance to foreshadowed outcomes. Analysis of variance statistical tests indicated that concrete rather than abstract language increased the frequency of choosing healthy over unhealthy foods when indicating food preferences. However, manipulations of proximity to outcomes and gain rather than loss frame did not affect food preferences. We discuss implications for effective public health campaigns, and economic and social cognitive theories of persuasion, and our data suggest that describing health outcomes in concrete rather than abstract terms may motivate healthier choices. Full article
10 pages, 240 KiB  
Article
Adequate Iodine Intake among Young Adults in Jiangsu Province, China Despite a Medium Iodine Knowledge Score
by Yifan Jin, Xiaoqin Luo, Zheng Feei Ma, Zihan Dong, Richard Carciofo, Xinli Li and Sheila Skeaff
Eur. J. Investig. Health Psychol. Educ. 2020, 10(1), 554-563; https://doi.org/10.3390/ejihpe10010040 - 9 Mar 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3451
Abstract
Lack of iodine knowledge might be a risk factor for inadequate iodine intake in populations. Therefore, we aimed to determine the relationship between iodine knowledge and intake in young Chinese adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Suzhou, China. Iodine intake was assessed [...] Read more.
Lack of iodine knowledge might be a risk factor for inadequate iodine intake in populations. Therefore, we aimed to determine the relationship between iodine knowledge and intake in young Chinese adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Suzhou, China. Iodine intake was assessed using a validated 33-item iodine-specific Chinese food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and iodine knowledge was determined using a Chinese iodine knowledge questionnaire. A total of 150 participants (mean age 20.3 years) completed the study. The median iodine intake plus iodized salt was 260 μg/d, indicating iodine sufficiency (>150 µg/d). The median iodine knowledge score was 16/24, suggesting a medium level of knowledge. The majority of participants correctly recognized fish and seafood (95%) and iodized salt (83%) as the most important dietary iodine sources. After adjusting for age and sex, studying in the science cluster and having received iodine education were the predictors of having a higher iodine knowledge score, with adjusted odd ratios (OR) of 4.33 (1.49, 12.61) and 2.73 (1.21, 6.14), respectively. In conclusion, young Chinese adults had an adequate iodine intake despite a medium iodine knowledge score. This study provides support that iodine fortification in China has been successful, but further research is required to more fully substantiate this finding. Full article
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