Special Issue "International Vocational Education and Training"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. In Heok Lee
Website
Guest Editor
Program of Workforce Education, University of Georgia, Athens, 30602, USA
Interests: secondary and postsecondary career and technical education for special needs; international vocational education and training; career development and vocational behavior
Assist. Prof. Jay Plasman
Website
Guest Editor
Program of Workforce Development and Education, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 43210, USA
Interests: education policy; educational statistics and research methods; international and comparative education; vocational education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Vocational education and training (VET) remains a core aspect to formal education systems around the world. It provides students with alternative pathways into the workforce, as opposed to traditional academic education. Despite numerous benefits associated with participation in VET, it has recently come under fire in various nations because of the potentially singular training focus involved in this type of education. The global economy calls for ever more adaptability of the workforce, as opposed to having a more specific, and potentially limited, set of skills. The focus of this Special Issue is on VET and its role in preparing students for life after secondary school, whether that leads to postsecondary education or directly into a career. It is becoming increasingly necessary for VET programs to justify their existence. Under this context, this issue will explore how VET participation is beneficial to students, whether that be in immediate entry into the workforce, long-term success, the promotion of broader employability skills, or an in-depth examination of characteristics of VET participants. Scholars are encouraged to explore this overarching idea through a variety of lenses—education, sociological, criminal justice, economic, etc.—in an effort to suggest cross-national recommendations for improving and encouraging VET participation.

Assoc. Prof. In Heok Lee
Assist. Prof. Jay Plasman
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Vocational education and training
  • International and comparative education
  • Workforce development
  • Education and career outcomes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Using E-Learning to Deliver In-Service Teacher Training in the Vocational Education Sector: Perception and Acceptance in Poland, Italy and Germany
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(7), 182; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10070182 - 13 Jul 2020
Abstract
For teachers in vocational education and training (VET), lifelong learning and related further training is important to meet the growing demands of the teaching profession. This paper analyses the perception of technology and e-learning of teachers in Poland, Italy and Germany. The innovative [...] Read more.
For teachers in vocational education and training (VET), lifelong learning and related further training is important to meet the growing demands of the teaching profession. This paper analyses the perception of technology and e-learning of teachers in Poland, Italy and Germany. The innovative aspect of this study lies in its combination of general perceptions of online learning and technology on the one hand and findings in relation to a specific online Teacher Training Tool on the other hand. The aims of this study are to show the relevance of e-learning in teacher training and to measure the perception and acceptance of this form of further training by VET teachers. The results should provide support for the further design and development of online education formats for teachers. The evaluation was carried out using a quantitative cross-cutting study using a standardised questionnaire. The results of an online questionnaire show that the approach of online learning as a form of teacher training was met with great interest among VET teachers and that the perception of one’s own benefit from such a training option was positive. The quality of the online learning units is decisive for the acceptance of e-learning opportunities. One limitation of this study is that the diverse country-specific cultural aspects and systems of teacher training could only be taken into account to a limited extent. This paper enables international comparative research on teacher training to be integrated using e-learning formats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue International Vocational Education and Training)
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Open AccessArticle
Best Practices in the Development of Transversal Competences among Youths in Vulnerable Situations
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(9), 230; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10090230 - 02 Sep 2020
Abstract
(1) Background: The aim of Second Chance Schools (E2Cs) is to provide employment-focused training for young people who left compulsory education without any formal qualifications by encouraging them to pursue initial vocational training. Transversal Competences (TCs) are important for enabling the social inclusion [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The aim of Second Chance Schools (E2Cs) is to provide employment-focused training for young people who left compulsory education without any formal qualifications by encouraging them to pursue initial vocational training. Transversal Competences (TCs) are important for enabling the social inclusion of young people in vulnerable situations by promoting their entry into the labour market. However, TCs are not always systematically developed. The objective of this study is to analyse good practices in inculcating these skills in this group of young people. (2) Methods: In-depth case studies were conducted in six best-practice schools. The following methods were used in the studies: questionnaires to school; a checklist to analyse the teaching materials used: an interview with the people responsible for the programme; an interview with students; and a questionnaire to representatives from the business sector. (3) Results: The six E2Cs attached great importance to TCs, which were taught specifically through a student-centred, active, varied and collaborative methodology that was periodically reviewed and adapted to students’ needs. TCs were evaluated before, during, and after the process was completed. (4) Conclusions: The results identified specific key elements for promoting the development of TCs that could be transferred to other schools and, consequently, could have implications for education policies in this field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue International Vocational Education and Training)
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