Industrial Education

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2022) | Viewed by 14689

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute for Research Excellence in Learning Sciences, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei City 106, Taiwan
Interests: creativity education; game-based learning; industrial education; STEAM education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Industrial education (vocational education) is a learning system that combines industries and schools; hence, it helps to develop human resources to meet the needs of industry [1]. Industrial education is also a form of training that teaches individuals to acquire skills that are necessary for employment, along with a foundation in applied science and humanities. The aim of all training is to help the trainee to develop skills that are needed in society, including the correct attitude and competitiveness [2]. Although its importance varies from country to country [3], industrial education is a valuable educational system, with prospects and goals that are set to meet vital social, economic and individual needs [4]. There are at least two main forms of industrial education: formal and informal education. The former includes secondary schools, vocational schools and colleges/universities, while the latter consists of institutions outside of the educational system, including pre-vocational training, on-the-job training, apprenticeship training systems, informal training centers and corporate training [5]. Ultimately, industrial education programs play an important role in the development of the quality of life of employees.

However, although industrial education plays a pivotal role in the economic development of modern society, with the continuous development of modern industry, a new era of information communication technology has arisen. In the face of rapid technological and economic changes and the fading of traditional industries, technical and industrial education needs to change accordingly [6], which makes it necessary to understand changes in industrial education and the status and trends of related research. Therefore, this journal presents a Special Issue on the topic of "Industrial Education". Everyone is welcome to contribute.

The topics include but are not limited to:

    1. Industrial education policy
    2. Industrial education and apprenticeship
    3. Industrial education and industry–academia cooperation
    4. Teacher training in industrial education
    5. STEAM and industrial education
    6. Distance learning in industrial education
    7. Innovative training in industrial education
    8. Literacy training in industrial education
    9. Emerging technologies in industrial education
    10. Literature review on industrial education

References

    1. Industrial education impact on vocational student social skills. Innovation of Vocational Technology Education14(2), 98-103.
    2. Technical and vocational education, a tool for national development in Nigeria. International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences, 03, 53-59.
    3. To vocationalise or not to vocationalise? Perspectives on current trends and issues in technical and vocational education and training (TVET) in Africa. International Journal of Educational Development27(2), 220-234.
    4. The standing of vocational education: Sources of its societal esteem and implications for its enactment. Journal of Vocational Education & Training66(1), 1-21.
    5. Vocational education and training in Asia. In J. P. Keeves, R. Watanabe, R. Maclean, P. D. Renshaw, C. N. Power, R. Baker, S. Gopinathan, H. W. Kam, Y. C. Cheng, A. C. Tuijnman (eds.), International handbook of educational research in the Asia-pacific region (pp. 673-686). Dordrecht, DE: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-3368-7_46
    6. How technological and vocational education can prosper in the 21st century. IEEE circuits and devices magazine19(2), 15-51.

Prof. Dr. Jon-Chao Hong
Dr. Jian-Hong Ye
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • industrial education
  • new technology in education and training
  • industrial education and training

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 2011 KiB  
Article
Students’ Technology, Cognitive, and Content Knowledge (TSCCK) Instructional Model Effect on Cognitive Load and Learning Achievement
by Qiong Wu, Sirirat Petsangsri and John Morris
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(12), 916; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12120916 - 14 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1715
Abstract
The application of scientific and technological approaches in education has been increasing year by year. We evaluated the effect of a TSCCK model based on the cognitive load theory on the cognitive load and learning achievement of vocational students: this model had six [...] Read more.
The application of scientific and technological approaches in education has been increasing year by year. We evaluated the effect of a TSCCK model based on the cognitive load theory on the cognitive load and learning achievement of vocational students: this model had six components: (1) analysis; (2) content development; (3) cloud development; (4) learning activity development; (5) model implementation; and (6) model revision. We used 62 students randomly selected from 115 students taking an “E-commerce data analysis and processing” course and used cluster random sampling. A total of 31 students were taught with instructions based on the TSCCK model, while 31 students were taught with a traditional method. The instruments used included lesson plans for the TSCCK group developed using the cognitive load theory and the workload profile self-rating scale (WP scale) used to measure the student cognitive load for both groups. The students who learned with TSCCK had significantly lower cognitive load (WP scale) scores than the students who learned with the traditional method, and their achievement scores were higher. The MANOVA confirmed that both the achievement scores and cognitive load measures for the two groups were significantly different at the 0.05 level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Industrial Education)
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12 pages, 797 KiB  
Article
Engineering Students’ Industrial Internship Experience Perception and Satisfaction: Work Experience Scale Validation
by Teresa Nogueira, José Magano, Eunice Fontão, Marina Sousa and Ângela Leite
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(11), 671; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11110671 - 21 Oct 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3279
Abstract
An essential aspect of higher education institutions’ academic curricula for engineering courses is the students’ industrial internship programs. In the literature, it is well accepted that such programs provide valuable learning outcomes and increase the graduates’ employment prospects. Thus, it is paramount to [...] Read more.
An essential aspect of higher education institutions’ academic curricula for engineering courses is the students’ industrial internship programs. In the literature, it is well accepted that such programs provide valuable learning outcomes and increase the graduates’ employment prospects. Thus, it is paramount to evaluate the internship programs’ quality to identify opportunities to improve their design and implementation. However, that evaluation typically depends on self-designed academic assessment surveys of questionable validity. The purpose of this paper is to assess engineering students’ perceptions of their internship experiences. For that purpose, the validation of a recently adapted version of the Work Experience Questionnaire (WEQ) was carried out on a sample of 447 engineering students that participated in industrial internship programs offered by Portuguese public universities and polytechnic schools. A confirmatory factor analysis was performed to confirm the suitability of the model proposed by the WEQ’s authors on this study’s sample. The psychometric qualities were evaluated through convergent and discriminant validity. The results showed that the model fit the sample well, and convergent and discriminant validity was established. The general competencies subscale was the most important for the participants—specifically, the competency of solving problems. Differences concerning the WEQ and gender, company size, and compensation were found and discussed. This study provides researchers in the field with a new tool validated explicitly for engineering students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Industrial Education)
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13 pages, 894 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Academic Self-Efficacy on Vocational Students Behavioral Engagement at School and at Firm Internships: A Model of Engagement-Value of Achievement Motivation
by Jon-Chao Hong, Hui-Ling Zhang, Jian-Hong Ye and Jhen-Ni Ye
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(8), 387; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11080387 - 28 Jul 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3883
Abstract
There has been a marked increase in internship participation in recent decades. Many students who take cooperative programs consider internships to be the most appropriate entry point into their chosen careers. However, few studies have investigated factors related to internships from an engagement-value [...] Read more.
There has been a marked increase in internship participation in recent decades. Many students who take cooperative programs consider internships to be the most appropriate entry point into their chosen careers. However, few studies have investigated factors related to internships from an engagement-value perspective that can influence the intention to continue doing internships with firms. This study concluded that academic self-efficacy was positively related to school and firm engagement; school engagement did not significantly relate to, but firm engagement did positively relate to the perceived usefulness of internships; and perceived usefulness of internships was positively related to intention to continue doing internships. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Industrial Education)
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18 pages, 2992 KiB  
Article
International Industrial Internship: A Case Study from a Japanese Engineering University Perspective
by Wai Kian Tan and Minoru Umemoto
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(4), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11040156 - 30 Mar 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3533
Abstract
In this globalization-focused era, the demand for globalized engineers in the creation of borderless societies is increasing. Despite the initiatives by the Japanese government to promote internalization through increasing the intake of foreign students, the exposures gained by the Japanese students from these [...] Read more.
In this globalization-focused era, the demand for globalized engineers in the creation of borderless societies is increasing. Despite the initiatives by the Japanese government to promote internalization through increasing the intake of foreign students, the exposures gained by the Japanese students from these programs are minimal. For years, internship has been used globally as a platform for training and educating future engineers, but only a few studies have examined the proactive transformation from domestic to international internship. International internships overseas offer a completely new dimension of experiences when carried out in multicultural environments. This article reports and offers evidence of a Japanese engineering university’s rapid global internship reform strategy toward the expansion of international internships in Malaysia. This paper provides insights into the process, from initial setup to implementation of the internship program covering all the necessary preparation and support. From the establishment of an overseas collaboration base and rapport building with hosting industries, the systematic steps taken are reported. Regarding the internship program, feedback from Japanese engineering students who completed their internships show improved satisfaction due to continuous improvement of the internship program with progressing years. It was also discovered that the low participation rate in overseas internship by Japanese students is not due to their inward-looking temperament, but due to the lack of internship program availability that is administered with sufficient preparation enabling them to challenge themselves in a new environment. The challenges encountered in the program, and the sustainable improvements made in alignment with sustainable development goals toward equitable quality education and promotion of lifelong learning are also stated. In this paper, the future perspectives and outlook of internships are also described considering today’s rapid technological advancements and the fast-changing needs of industries, which require future internship programs to have flexible approaches and ideologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Industrial Education)
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