Special Issue "Emerging Issues in Maritime Education and Training"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 September 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Charlott Sellberg
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Applied Information Technology, University of Gothenburg, 417 56 Gothenburg, Sweden
Interests: maritime education and training; digital technologies in higher education; pedagogical development of teachers; theories of cognition and learning
Prof. Dr. Salman Nazir
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Technology, Natural Sciences and Maritime Sciences, Department of Maritime operations, University of South-Eastern Norway, Raveien 215, 3184 Borre, Norway
Interests: human factors; training methods; virtual reality training simulators; training syllabus; performance indices; performance assessment; performance management; spatial learning; virtual and augmented virtual reality; learning processes; complex socio-technical systems; situation awareness and distributed situation awareness; distributed situation awareness indices; human-autonomy teaming
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Gesa Praetorius
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Kalmar Maritime Academy, Linnaeus University, 39182 Kalmar, Sweden
2. Department of Maritime Operations, University of South-Eastern Norway, 3199 Borre, Norway
Interests: maritime education and training; safety training; resilience engineering; cognitive systems engineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

In a constantly evolving society, the maritime industry faces similar challenges to those of other technologically advanced and safety-critical domains to prepare future seafarers for work in a global industry, characterized by rapidly advancing levels of digitalization, as well as an increasingly diverse workforce. Raised awareness on the need for sustainable shipping, reducing the negative impact on our marine and costal environments, is also leading to increased levels of ambition for the international shipping sector. This, in turn, poses challenges for maritime education and training (MET) to train and assess the future workforce towards high standards of professionalism, equipped with relevant technical competences, interpersonal skills related to communication, teamwork and leadership, as well as awareness of issues such as gender equality, cultural competencies, and labor rights. Rapidly advancing levels of automation also lead to increasing demands for MET to support career development and transition between shore- and shipborne work environments in the maritime industry. The aim of this Special Issue is to gather empirical research from MET, as well as new theoretical and methodological approaches and literature reviews that address emerging issues related to these technological, societal and environmental changes. Emerging issues include but are not limited to the following themes:

  • Implementation of new technologies, such as advanced simulators, virtual reality, augmented reality or eye-tracking technologies and the need for new pedagogical approaches that follows;
  • Development of 21-centrury literacies, for example, digital literacy, data literacy, and information literacy;
  • Pedagogical issues related to social sustainability, e.g., lifelong learning, personal growth, and social inclusion;
  • Pedagogical efforts to advance awareness on environmental sustainability in shipping, e.g., reduction of CO2 emissions, sewage and toxic disposal, transfer of invasive alien species, and noise and wave disturbances;
  • Emerging approaches to safety training, such as resilience training, cybersecurity training or antipiracy training;
  • Competence insurance, certification and inclusive learning opportunities for a globally distributed workforce.

Dr. Charlott Sellberg
Prof. Dr. Salman Nazir
Dr. Gesa Praetorius
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • maritime education and training (MET)
  • educational technologies
  • sustainability
  • literacy
  • safety training
  • teaching
  • learning
  • assessment

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Using Operational Scenarios in a Virtual Reality Enhanced Design Process
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(8), 448; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11080448 - 21 Aug 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 896
Abstract
Maritime user interfaces for ships’ bridges are highly dependent on the context in which they are used, and rich maritime context is difficult to recreate in the early stages of user-centered design processes. Operations in Arctic waters where crews are faced with extreme [...] Read more.
Maritime user interfaces for ships’ bridges are highly dependent on the context in which they are used, and rich maritime context is difficult to recreate in the early stages of user-centered design processes. Operations in Arctic waters where crews are faced with extreme environmental conditions, technology limitations and a lack of accurate navigational information further increase this challenge. There is a lack of research supporting the user-centered design of workplaces for hazardous Arctic operations. To meet this challenge, this paper reports on the process of developing virtual reality-reconstructed operational scenarios to connect stakeholders, end-users, designers, and human factors specialists in a joint process. This paper explores how virtual reality-reconstructed operational scenarios can be used as a tool both for concept development and user testing. Three operational scenarios were developed, implemented in a full mission bridge simulator, recreated in virtual reality (VR), and finally tested on navigators (end-users). Qualitative data were captured throughout the design process and user-testing, resulting in a thematic analysis that identified common themes reflecting the experiences gained throughout this process. In conclusion, we argue that operational scenarios, rendered in immersive media such as VR, may be an important and reusable asset when supporting maritime design processes and in maritime training and education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Maritime Education and Training)
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Article
Enhancing Maritime Crew Resource Management Training by Applying Resilience Engineering: A Case Study of the Bachelor Maritime Officer Training Programme in Rotterdam
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(8), 378; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11080378 - 23 Jul 2021
Viewed by 873
Abstract
This paper sets out to enhance current Maritime Crew Resource Management (MCRM) training, and with that to improve the training of technical and non-technical skills given to bachelor maritime officers. The rationale for CRM training is improving safety performance by reducing accidents caused [...] Read more.
This paper sets out to enhance current Maritime Crew Resource Management (MCRM) training, and with that to improve the training of technical and non-technical skills given to bachelor maritime officers. The rationale for CRM training is improving safety performance by reducing accidents caused by human error. The central notion of CRM training is that applying good resource management principles during day-to-day operations will lead to a beneficial change in attitudes and behaviour regarding safety. This article therefore indicates that enhanced MCRM should play a more structural role in the training of student officers. However, the key question is: what are the required changes in attitude and behaviour that will create sufficient adaptability to improve safety performance? To provide an answer, we introduce the Resilience Engineering (RE) theory. From an RE point of view, we elaborate on the relation between team adaptability and safety performance, operationalized as a competence profile. In addition, a case study of the ‘Rotterdam Approach’ will be presented, in which the MCRM training design has been enhanced with RE, with the objective to train team adaptability skills for improved safety performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Maritime Education and Training)
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Article
Assessing the Technology Self-Efficacy of Maritime Instructors: An Explorative Study
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(7), 342; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11070342 - 12 Jul 2021
Viewed by 651
Abstract
Maritime Education and Training (MET) is an integral part of the global maritime industry, playing an essential role in ensuring that the sector is supplied continuously with a skilled workforce. The successful outcomes of the educational content delivery in MET institutes depend, to [...] Read more.
Maritime Education and Training (MET) is an integral part of the global maritime industry, playing an essential role in ensuring that the sector is supplied continuously with a skilled workforce. The successful outcomes of the educational content delivery in MET institutes depend, to a certain extent, on the maritime instructor’s ability to create conducive learning environments utilizing all of the resources available. The self-efficacy of maritime instructors in various facets, most notably their proficiency with the use of technology in classrooms, can lead to the introduction of transformative learning practices. Accurately measuring their self-reported technological proficiency could be the initial step in this direction. This study aimed to measure the self-reported technology proficiency of maritime instructors using an established and validated scale: Technology Proficiency Self-Assessment for the 21st century (TPSA-C21). The scale was administered, using an online survey, to a sample of MET instructors within Europe and the UK, with n = 62 valid responses received. Using descriptive statistics and the evaluation of the measurement model, the study highlighted the perceived level of proficiency of the MET instructors along dimensions such as email, world-wide web use, emerging tools, teaching with technology, integrated applications, and teaching with emerging technologies. The survey also measured the perceived level of technology integration for maritime instructors according to the Concerned-Based Adoption Model–Level of Use (CBAM–LoU) classification. The results indicate a potential area of improvement for maritime instructors with regard to their self-reported proficiency, namely in the dimension of teaching with emerging technology. The implications for the MET domain, the respondent demographics and the future research directions are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Maritime Education and Training)
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