Special Issue "Project and Design-Based Learning in Electrical and Computer Engineering for K-16 Students and Teachers"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Kumar Yelamarthi
Website
Guest Editor
Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859, USA
Interests: Internet of Things, embedded systems, wireless sensor networks, freshman engineering, multidisciplinary projects, engineering education
Dr. Tolga Kaya
Website
Guest Editor
School of Computer Science and Engineering, Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT 06825, USA
Interests: sensors; drones; engineering education
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Technology has been advancing rapidly over the past two decades. Particularly impressive is the electrical and computer engineering (ECE) disciplines that have led to the rapid advancement in cellular phones, wireless communication, embedded systems, 3D printers, and significant updates in the ECE curriculum in the recent years.

This Special Issue welcomes submissions of manuscripts from scholars focused on project- and design-based learning in ECE disciplines. In this Special Issue, we are interested in works of educators that challenge the status quo to better prepare the future generation of working professionals. Some examples of relevant work include:

  • drafting multidisciplinary teams to solve open-ended, complex problems in teaching and learning,
  • implementing project- and design-based learning,
  • utilizing ECE technology to better deliver their course content,
  • training educators in professional growth and content delivery.

In this Special Issue, “Project and Design-Based Learning in Electrical and Computer Engineering for K-16 Students and Teachers”, we are interested in submissions from elementary schools through graduate engineering programs and teacher preparation programs for Next Generation Science Standards. Research studies may involve both traditional classroom settings, as well as informal settings such as summer programs.

Prof. Dr. Kumar Yelamarthi
Dr. Tolga Kaya
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • assessment
  • design thinking
  • design integration in K-12
  • E-learning
  • embedded systems
  • first-year curriculum
  • innovative teaching
  • Internet of Things
  • makerspace
  • multidisciplinary senior design
  • NGSS
  • robotics
  • service learning
  • student retention and persistence

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Supporting Project-Based Learning through Economical and Flexible Learning Spaces
Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(3), 212; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9030212 - 09 Aug 2019
Abstract
Project-based learning often centers learning experiences around projects and is characterized by the application of knowledge, management of resources, and self-directed learning. In recent years, newer classroom designs have been developed to facilitate communication, classroom interaction and active learning but the cost of [...] Read more.
Project-based learning often centers learning experiences around projects and is characterized by the application of knowledge, management of resources, and self-directed learning. In recent years, newer classroom designs have been developed to facilitate communication, classroom interaction and active learning but the cost of such spaces can be prohibitive. Here we present two economical options for flexible learning spaces that support the aims of project-based learning and cost much less than typical active learning classroom models. In a quasi-experimental study, one of our economical active learning environments was paired with a traditional classroom and a prototypical active learning classroom. These learning environments were used in a CS2 course that employed a group-based, active learning pedagogy centered on in-class projects. Students’ perceptions were gathered on the classrooms and their supporting technology. Between the economy and prototypical active learning environment, no significant differences were found in students’ perceptions of the space as it related to collaboration and supporting learning. Results from accompany focus groups indicates that the space was conducive to their learning and helped them engage with peers. These economical and flexible options support the aims of project-based learning at a reduced cost. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Tales from the Exam Room: Trialing an E-Exam System for Computer Education and Design and Technology Students
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8040188 - 28 Oct 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
The Centre for Schooling and Learning Technologies (CSaLT) at Edith Cowan University (ECU) was asked in 2016 to be the Western Australian arm of a national e-exam project. This project used a bespoke exam system installed on a USB-drive to deliver what would [...] Read more.
The Centre for Schooling and Learning Technologies (CSaLT) at Edith Cowan University (ECU) was asked in 2016 to be the Western Australian arm of a national e-exam project. This project used a bespoke exam system installed on a USB-drive to deliver what would have been traditional paper-based exams in an enclosed computer-based environment that was isolated from the internet and any resources other than those provided by the lecturer. This paper looks at the two exams chosen by the Western Australian group for the trial; a programming exam for pre-service computing teachers and an occupational health and safety exam for pre-service design and technology teachers. Both groups were drawn from the Graduate Diploma in Education course at ECU. The paper looks at the nature of the exam environment and the procedure for creating e-exams. It also outlines the exam procedures used and examines the feedback provided by both the lecturers and students involved. Conclusions are drawn about the suitability of the e-exam system and improvements are recommended as well as a discussion about e-exams and digital assessment more generally. Full article
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