Special Issue "Current Research in Inclusive Education"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Special and Inclusive Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 9681

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Olga María Alegre de la Rosa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of La Laguna, Avda. Trinidad s/n. 38204, San Cristóbal de La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain
Interests: education; inclusion; special education; individual needs; accesibility; disabilities
Prof. Dr. Luis Miguel Villar Angulo
E-Mail
Guest Editor
University of Sevilla, Calle San Fernando, 4, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
Interests: education; inclusion; special education; individual needs; accesibility; disabilities

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Attending to diversity is an indicator of teaching quality. The fundamentals of diversity education go back to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It means the commitment to respect the rights of the people belonging to minorities of any type and scope. It also implies a process of inclusion and continuous improvement that extends throughout the world and which focuses on the capabilities of people.

The international reports about inclusion education confer substantial short and long-term benefits for students with and without disabilities.

The benefits of inclusion for students with disabilities extend beyond academic results to social connection benefits. Inclusion education increases post-secondary education placement and improves employment and independence outcomes. Moreover, the benefits of inclusion for non-disabled students reduce fear of human difference and most importantly, inclusive education increases comfort and awareness, develops growth in social cognition, improves self-concept, improves personal, moral and ethical principles, and warm and caring friendships.

Teaching practice is central to ensuring that inclusive education provides benefits to all students. Teachers with positive attitudes towards inclusion are more likely to adapt the way they work for the benefit of all students and to influence their colleagues in positive ways to support inclusion.

I have set out to collect recent research related to inclusive education in a monograph entitled Current Research in Inclusive Education. It will have specific topics related to the latest advances in disability, accessibility, inclusive education, special educational needs, as well as issues related to educational programs linked to visual, auditory and motor difficulties.

I have accepted the invitation to coordinate this monographic number with pleasure, as an opportunity to visualize the work of so many researchers and research groups of national and international prestige who focus their studies in the field of inclusion.

The papers that will make up the monographic number will be those accepted after the blind peer review process used by the journal.

References:

Alegre y Villar (2019): Emotional and Behavioral Difficulties, Communication, Intelligence, and Reasoning in Children with Hearing Difficulties. Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(3), 234; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9030234

Alegre y Villar (2019): Attitudes of Children with Hearing Loss towards Public Inclusive Education. Educ. Sci. 2019, 9(3), 244; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci9030244

Prof. Dr. Olga María Alegre de la Rosa
Prof. Dr. Luis Miguel Villar Angulo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Education
  • Inclusion
  • Special education
  • Individual needs
  • Accessibility
  • Disabilities
  • Deaf education
  • Hearing loss children

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Initial Training of Primary School Teachers: Development of Competencies for Inclusion and Attention to Diversity
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(8), 413; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11080413 - 09 Aug 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1771
Abstract
Teachers need to be prepared to attend to all learners regardless of their abilities or needs. This implies that future teachers must develop, throughout their initial training, the necessary competencies to provide inclusive education to all students. The aim of this research was [...] Read more.
Teachers need to be prepared to attend to all learners regardless of their abilities or needs. This implies that future teachers must develop, throughout their initial training, the necessary competencies to provide inclusive education to all students. The aim of this research was to analyze the level of development of competencies related to inclusion and attention to diversity among university students of a degree in primary education. Based on the project developed by the European Agency for Development in Special Needs Education (EADSNE) on the profile of the inclusive teacher, an ad hoc survey was prepared based on the four fundamental competencies proposed: valuing student diversity, supporting all students, working as part of a team, and developing one’s professional and personal qualities. This survey was administered to 440 students of the degree in primary education from the University of La Laguna (San Cristóbal de La Laguna, Spain). The results showed a positive development of the four competencies, with a higher development of the competencies of continuing professional development. It was also found that the students had the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for promoting inclusion and encouraging attention to diversity in their classrooms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Research in Inclusive Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Evaluation of Diversity Programs in Higher Education Training Contexts in Spain
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(5), 226; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11050226 - 11 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1419
Abstract
Measures adopted by educational systems to improve and adapt the educational response of pupils with disability or diversity conditions arising from their personal and social conditions, have enabled them to gain tenure throughout the various stages of education. Educational institutions have been progressively [...] Read more.
Measures adopted by educational systems to improve and adapt the educational response of pupils with disability or diversity conditions arising from their personal and social conditions, have enabled them to gain tenure throughout the various stages of education. Educational institutions have been progressively adapting and responding to the educational needs of students who start university, and this fact highlights the lack of inclusive culture in university institutions. The lack of training of university teachers in the educational response to the needs of students with disabilities is evidenced by the high dropout rates of this group and in successive complaints of teachers who do not have the skills or tools to cope with this situation successfully. The review of a set of 75 programs developed by different Spanish universities to meet the needs of these students shows an insufficient institutional and administrative response while reflecting the lack of unity of jointly developed criteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Research in Inclusive Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Perception and Attitude of Teachers towards the Inclusion of Students with Hearing Disabilities
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(4), 187; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11040187 - 18 Apr 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1611
Abstract
The aim of this study is to demonstrate the attitudes and perceptions of teachers regarding the educational inclusion of students with hearing disabilities. The study sample consisted of 128 teachers from the Canary Islands, of which 72 worked in ordinary centers and 56 [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to demonstrate the attitudes and perceptions of teachers regarding the educational inclusion of students with hearing disabilities. The study sample consisted of 128 teachers from the Canary Islands, of which 72 worked in ordinary centers and 56 in Ordinary Centers for Preferential Educational Attention for Hearing Disability (COAEPHD). A quantitative cut methodology was used, based on the use of the Questionnaire of Opinions, Attitudes and Competencies of Teachers towards Disability (CACPD). The results of this study do not allow us to affirm that the teachers showed positive attitudes towards inclusion, expressing concern about offering a correct and adequate response to the students with hearing disabilities. They considered that educational inclusion requires important improvements focused on the training and specialization of teachers in the field of inclusion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Research in Inclusive Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Education and Care: How Teachers Promote the Inclusion of Children and Youth at Risk in South Africa
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(10), 273; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10100273 - 09 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1770
Abstract
Children and youth at risk, particularly those placed in child and youth care centres (CYCC) in South Africa, have suffered from school disengagement due to multiple barriers to learning such as the exposure to crime and violence at a young age. As children [...] Read more.
Children and youth at risk, particularly those placed in child and youth care centres (CYCC) in South Africa, have suffered from school disengagement due to multiple barriers to learning such as the exposure to crime and violence at a young age. As children and youth at risk at these centres find it difficult to engage in learning, new approaches need to be found to re-engage their interest to learn. This article discusses how the ‘Curriculum of Care’, an adaptation of the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS), responds to the educational needs of children and youth at risk at a CYCC in the Western Cape. It draws primarily from interviews and a focus group discussion with the centre manager and teachers at the institution. The findings reveal that positive learning outcomes, and the effective integration of children and youth at risk, are shaped by positive teacher–learner relationships; however, the findings raise questions about the extent to which such a curriculum prepares children and youth at risk for life after they leave the institution. The article suggests that the institutions providing education and care for children and youth at risk need to provide a curriculum balancing academic rigour with care to promote a holistic, inclusive education programme that enables youth and children at risk to effectively navigate their entry into society. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Research in Inclusive Education)
Article
The Quality of Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis: Families’ Views
Educ. Sci. 2020, 10(9), 256; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci10090256 - 21 Sep 2020
Viewed by 1818
Abstract
The birth of a child diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) tends to strongly disrupt family dynamics and functioning. However, the severity of the impact may be softened if the family feels supported during the diagnostic process. The Valencia region (Spain)—where this study [...] Read more.
The birth of a child diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) tends to strongly disrupt family dynamics and functioning. However, the severity of the impact may be softened if the family feels supported during the diagnostic process. The Valencia region (Spain)—where this study is located—recently put in place a protocol to improve ASD detection and support for families. The aim of this study was to identify these families’ views on the quality of the process experienced and the operation of the new system. The participants were 34 families with a child who had been diagnosed with this condition. A mixed methodological approach was adopted. A descriptive analysis and an interpretative-phenomenological study were performed using SPSS v. 25 and AQUAD 7, respectively. The results showed that while families seemed to be relatively satisfied, there is still room for improvement in some important areas such as guidance and emotional support, the training of the professionals involved, and waiting time. It was concluded that significant improvements must be implemented in the new diagnostic model to successfully meet the demands of families in a context characterized by a paucity of studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Research in Inclusive Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop