Special Issue "Transportation Infrastructure Impacts on Biodiversity in Emerging Economies"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Biodiversity Conservation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Clara Grilo
Website
Guest Editor
CESAM - Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: road-kill; barrier effect; highway impacts; conservation biology
Dr. Anthony P. Clevenger
Website
Guest Editor
Western Transportation Institute, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59715, USA
Interests: landscape connectivity; carnivore conservation; road ecology; road impact mitigation
Dr. Aliza le Roux
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of the Free State, Qwaqwa, Private Bag X13, Phuthaditjihaba 9866, South Africa
Interests: behavioural ecology; cognitive ecology; mammalogy; road ecology; small carnivores; urban ecology
Dr. Bilal Habib
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Wildlife Institute of India, Dehradun 248001, India
Interests: carnivore conservation and connectivity; human wildlife conflict; road ecology; conservation biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diversity is going to publish a Special Issue entitled “Transportation Infrastructure Impacts on Biodiversity in Emerging Economies. In this Special Issue, we seek high quality research articles that will advance our understanding of transportation infrastructure impacts on biodiversity conservation and help inform science-based solutions to rapidly expanding road networks worldwide. Transportation infrastructure is defined as roads and railways.

Roughly 25 million kilometres of new roads are expected to be constructed by 2050, mostly through the expansion of road networks into some of the world’s most diverse and biologically rich ecosystems. In Asia alone, the Asian Development Bank estimates that $1.7 trillion of infrastructure investments is needed per year until 2030 to maintain the Asia region’s growth momentum, tackle poverty, and respond to climate change. In Africa, 33 development corridors are operational, under construction, or planned. Combined, they traverse 38 countries and total 53,000 km in length. The South American boom consists of >600 projects worth $200 billion and lays out more than 100,000 km of new roads.

The impacts of roads and railways have been well documented, including their indirect role in deforestation and biodiversity loss. In the last 30 years, most research on transportation infrastructure impacts on biodiversity has been published in developed countries and temperate regions. Tropical ecosystems are especially vulnerable to road and railway impacts due to the ecological specialization of species that live there. The impacts of roads and railways, and practical solutions to mitigate them, are often qualitatively and quantitatively different in nations with emerging economies and tropical regions. There is a clear and urgent need to increase understanding of these impacts, devise science-based solutions to mitigate them, and communicate relevant case studies that may inform other jurisdictions.

The aim of this issue is to showcase three continents where transportation infrastructure networks are expanding at an unprecedented rate, threatening the world’s most abundant biodiversity and complex ecosystems – Africa, Asia, and Latin America. We seek written contributions that clearly and succinctly address current ecological effects of road/railway systems at the individual, population and ecosystem level; evaluations of measures to mitigate impacts; innovative policy instruments and funding partnerships for research and mitigation; transboundary and ecosystem level initiatives to assess and mitigate impacts, novel methods and research tools, and valued case studies that can be applied to similar ecosystem, political, and cultural contexts.

Dr. Clara Grilo
Dr. Anthony P. Clevenger
Dr. Aliza le Roux
Dr. Bilal Habib
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). If you would like to apply for a discount, please submit a cover letter of interest for publication to the Editorial Office () and provide all authors’ information and the abstract or proposal. We would provide a 50% discount for the first 10 papers once the abstract/proposal gets approved by the office. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • road effects
  • wildlife
  • mitigation
  • road planning and design
  • best-practices guidelines
  • ecological modeling

Published Papers

This special issue is now open for submission.
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