Special Issue "Promoting Biodiversity in Forest and Landscape Restoration"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Diversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Evert Thomas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Bioversity International, Rome, Italy
Interests: forest and landscape restoration; Theobroma cacao genetic resources; Bertholletia excelsa ecology; GIS; species suitability modeling; inter- and intra-specific spatial diversity analysis; ethnobotany

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The promise of forest and landscape restoration (FLR), either through assisting natural regeneration or active planting for supporting global commitments regarding climate change mitigation, biodiversity conservation, and halting desertification, has never been greater. However, too often insufficient attention is still being given to the integration of biodiversity in (especially large-scale) restoration projects. Restoring ecosystems that become self-sustaining and able to persist under a changing climate requires the consideration of all levels of diversity, from soil–plant and plant–animal interactions, over genetic, functional, and species diversity, to landscape and ecosystem diversity. Approaches to FLR that embrace diversity are also more likely to generate an abundance of ecosystem services, and as such can lead to multiple wins. For this Special Issue we welcome submissions that showcase the importance, feasibility, and/or benefits of integrating biodiversity in FLR.

Dr. Evert Thomas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • forest and landscape restoration
  • ecological restoration
  • genetic diversity
  • functional traits
  • soil–plant interactions
  • plant–animal interactions, pollination, seed dispersal

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Soil Nematode Communities in Managed and Natural Temperate Forest
Diversity 2021, 13(7), 327; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13070327 - 16 Jul 2021
Viewed by 261
Abstract
Forest management and the stand age play key roles in determining the composition of soil biota, including nematodes. We analysed the effect of the interaction between stands of natural forest and stands influenced by human activity on nematode communities, necessary for realistically assessing [...] Read more.
Forest management and the stand age play key roles in determining the composition of soil biota, including nematodes. We analysed the effect of the interaction between stands of natural forest and stands influenced by human activity on nematode communities, necessary for realistically assessing the specific potentials of forest soils, plant protection, forest management, and land use management. Nematode communities were evaluated and compared in managed beech and spruce forests in three age classes (0–20, 40–60, and 100–120 years old) and an unmanaged old-growth temperate forest. A total of 51 nematode genera were found in the forests. The number of nematode genera was the highest (46) in European beech forests, dominated by Rhabditis and Filenchus. In contrast, the number of nematode genera was the lowest (37) in a Norway spruce forest, but where nematode abundance was the highest due mostly to the high abundance of bacterivorous nematodes such as Acrobeloides, Plectus, and Rhabditis. The unmanaged old-growth forest had the lowest nematode abundance and total biomass but the highest abundance of herbivorous nematodes of the order Tylenchida, especially Filenchus, Malenchus, and Paratylenchus, and a high abundance of identified genera of predators. The number of identified nematode genera, abundance, total biomass, and diversity index were the highest in young 0–20-year-old stands, and the lowest in 100–120-year-old stands. Enrichment, structure, and basal indices were influenced by both the stands and the ages of the forests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Promoting Biodiversity in Forest and Landscape Restoration)
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