New Era of Testing: Salivary Diagnostics

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2019) | Viewed by 9160

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
The School of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, QLD, Australia
Interests: biomarkers; salivary diagnostics; heart diseases; head and neck cancer; proteomics; mass spectrometry; lung cancer, glioblastoma; human papilloma virus
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Guest Editor
The School of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, QLD, Australia

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Guest Editor
School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health, Saliva & Liquid Biopsy Translational Research Group, Cancer and Ageing Theme, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation (IHBI), Queensland University of Technology (QUT), 60 Musk Avenue, Kelvin Grove, QLD, Australia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ageing and the growing population are placing increased pressure on the healthcare system. We require better methods to diagnose diseases at an earlier stage than is currently possible. There is also evidence linking oral health conditions to systemic events. As such, human saliva is gaining attention as the diagnostic fluid for the future. Human saliva collection is non-invasive, easy and multiple samples can be collected from an individual with minimal discomfort to the person. Saliva contains about 30% of the proteins contained in blood. Biomolecules continuously move beween saliva and blood and as such biomarkers in the circulation can be detected in saliva. Saliva is currently used to detect hormones and drugs of abuse and will be used in the future for other systemic diseases.

Dr. Chamindie K. Punyadeera
Dr. Kai Dun Tang
Dr. Arutha Kulasinghe
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • liquid biopsy
  • saliva diagnostics
  • biomarkers

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

6 pages, 1023 KiB  
Communication
Setup of Quantitative PCR for Oral Neisseria spp. Evaluation in Celiac Disease Diagnosis
by Maria Valeria Esposito, Carmela Nardelli, Ilaria Granata, Chiara Pagliuca, Valeria D’Argenio, Ilaria Russo, Mario Rosario Guarracino, Paola Salvatore, Giovanna Del Vecchio Blanco, Carolina Ciacci and Lucia Sacchetti
Diagnostics 2020, 10(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10010012 - 26 Dec 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3194
Abstract
Coeliac disease (CD) is a multifactorial autoimmune disorder and gut dysbiosis contributes to its pathogenesis. We previously profiled by 16S rRNA sequencing duodenal and oropharyngeal microbiomes in active CD (a-CD), gluten-free diet (GFD) patients, and controls (CO) and found significantly higher levels of [...] Read more.
Coeliac disease (CD) is a multifactorial autoimmune disorder and gut dysbiosis contributes to its pathogenesis. We previously profiled by 16S rRNA sequencing duodenal and oropharyngeal microbiomes in active CD (a-CD), gluten-free diet (GFD) patients, and controls (CO) and found significantly higher levels of Neisseria spp., with pro-inflammatory activities, in a-CD patients than in the other two groups. In this study, we developed a fast and simple qPCR-based method to evaluate the abundance of the oral Neisseria spp. and the diagnostic performances of the test in CD diagnosis. The Neisseria spp. abundances detected by quantitative PCR (qPCR) were: CO = 0.14, GFD = 0.15, a-CD = 2.08, showing a similar trend to those previously measured by next generation sequencing (NGS). In particular, Neisseria spp. values obtained by both methods were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in a-CD than in the other two groups GFD and CO—the latter almost overlapping. We calculated by ROC curve analysis the threshold of 1.12 ng/μL of Neisseria spp. to discriminate between CO+GFD and a-CD patients with 100% and 96.7% of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, respectively. In conclusion, our data, if confirmed in other cohorts, suggest the q-PCR evaluation of oral Neisseria spp. could be a fast and simple method to assess CD-associated dysbiosis for diagnostic purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Era of Testing: Salivary Diagnostics)
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9 pages, 439 KiB  
Article
Active Matrix Metalloproteinase-8 Point-of-Care (PoC)/Chairside Mouthrinse Test vs. Bleeding on Probing in Diagnosing Subclinical Periodontitis in Adolescents
by Ismo T. Räisänen, Timo Sorsa, Gerrit-Jan van der Schoor, Taina Tervahartiala, Peter van der Schoor, Dirk-Rolf Gieselmann and Anna Maria Heikkinen
Diagnostics 2019, 9(1), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics9010034 - 23 Mar 2019
Cited by 37 | Viewed by 5606
Abstract
This cross-sectional study compares the effectiveness of an active MMP-8 (aMMP-8) point-of-care (PoC)/chairside mouthrinse test to the conventional bleeding on probing (BOP) (cutoff 20%) test in detecting subclinical periodontitis/pre-periodontitis in Finnish adolescents. The study was carried out at the Kotka Health Center, Finland. [...] Read more.
This cross-sectional study compares the effectiveness of an active MMP-8 (aMMP-8) point-of-care (PoC)/chairside mouthrinse test to the conventional bleeding on probing (BOP) (cutoff 20%) test in detecting subclinical periodontitis/pre-periodontitis in Finnish adolescents. The study was carried out at the Kotka Health Center, Finland. A total of 47 adolescents (30 boys/17 girls) aged 15–17 were first tested with the aMMP-8 PoC test, followed by a full-mouth evaluation of clinical parameters of oral health including periodontal, oral mucosal, and caries assessment. A periodontist performed these clinical examinations. The aMMP-8 PoC test result had much stronger association with subclinical periodontitis than the BOP 20% test (2.8–5.3 times stronger in terms of odds ratio). The aMMP-8 PoC test had ≥2 times higher sensitivity than the BOP 20% test with, generally, the same specificity. Further, the aMMP-8 PoC test had generally better accuracy and lower false negative percentages. The aMMP-8 PoC test seemed to be more effective than the conventional BOP test in detecting subclinical periodontitis/pre-periodontitis in adolescents reducing the risk of their undertreatment. However, the sample size may be a limiting factor, and more studies are needed to confirm our results for both adolescents and adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Era of Testing: Salivary Diagnostics)
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