Special Issue "Dental Peri-Implant Point-of-Care Tests"

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Point-of-Care Diagnostics and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Timo Sorsa
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, Helsinki University and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki 00290, Finland
Interests: matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-8) and related factors; synthetic MMP-inhibitors; periodontal research; chair-side/bed-side/point-of-care MMP-diagnostic tests in periodontitis and related systemic diseases
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues:

Currently, the diagnosis of both periodontal and peri-implant diseases is mainly based on the clinical measurement of pocket depths, attachment loss, and bleeding on probing, together with radiographic examination. These diagnostic procedures can assess only past tissue destruction and do not provide any information about the current disease states and activities or future risk of progression. Therefore, the need for potential biomarkers emerges in order to screen the susceptible sites and patients in order to intervene in a timely manner and prevent irreversible periodontal and dental peri-implant tissue destruction in both periodontitis and dental peri-implantitis.

Point-of-care tests are simple medical tests that can be performed at the bedside. Point-of-care tests are often accomplished through the use of transportable, portable, and handheld instruments. Cheaper, faster, and smarter point-of-care tests devices have increased the use of Point-of-care tests approaches by making it cost-effective for many diseases. Additionally, it is very desirable to measure various analytes simultaneously in the same specimen, allowing rapid, low-cost, and reliable quantification. Therefore, Point-of-care testing has become more important for medical diagnostics in the last decade. In this context, and in view of the latest advances in translational research on periodontal and peri-implant disease biomarkers, point-of-care technologies are emerging as new tools to target periodontitis and peri-implantitis. In particular, these technologies could help to pinpoint the crucial transition of gingivitis or subclinical periodontitis without clinical or radiographic manifestations to active periodontal disease, with progressive deepened pockets and attachment loss.

Prof. Dr. Timo Sorsa
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication
aMMP-8 Point-of-Care/Chairside Oral Fluid Technology as a Rapid, Non-Invasive Tool for Periodontitis and Peri-Implantitis Screening in a Medical Care Setting
Diagnostics 2020, 10(8), 562; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10080562 - 05 Aug 2020
Abstract
This communication article addresses currently available rapid non-invasive methods to screen and detect periodontitis and dental peri-implantitis. In this regard, oral fluid biomarkers have been researched extensively but self-reported oral health (SROH)-questionnaires have also been developed. Both alternatives may offer a quick and [...] Read more.
This communication article addresses currently available rapid non-invasive methods to screen and detect periodontitis and dental peri-implantitis. In this regard, oral fluid biomarkers have been researched extensively but self-reported oral health (SROH)-questionnaires have also been developed. Both alternatives may offer a quick and easy way to screen and detect diseased patients. Active matrix metalloproteinase (aMMP-8) is one of the most validated biomarkers for screening and detecting periodontal breakdown related to periodontitis and peri-implantitis and monitoring their treatment effects revealing successful, less- and non-successful treatment results. Currently available aMMP-8 lateral-flow technologies allow this kind of analysis, as demonstrated here, to be conducted quantitatively online and real-time as point-of-care/chairside testing in dental and even medical care settings. In this study, an aMMP-8 peri-implant sulcular fluid point-of-care-test diagnosed peri-implantitis and healthy implants far more accurately than bleeding-on-probing or the other biomarkers, such as polymorphonuclear (PMN)/neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase and MMP-9. Although, SROH-questionnaires allow screening in similar settings but they lack the information about the current disease activity of periodontitis and peri-implantitis, which is of essential value in periodontal diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Thus, both methods can be considered as adjunct methods for periodontitis and peri-implant diagnostics, but the value of oral fluid biomarkers analysis does not seem to be substitutable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Peri-Implant Point-of-Care Tests)
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Open AccessArticle
Immunological and Microbiological Profiling of Cumulative Risk Score for Periodontitis
Diagnostics 2020, 10(8), 560; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10080560 - 05 Aug 2020
Abstract
The cumulative risk score (CRS) is a mathematical salivary diagnostic model to define an individual’s risk of having periodontitis. In order to further validate this salivary biomarker, we investigated how periodontal bacteria, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and systemic and local host immune responses relate to [...] Read more.
The cumulative risk score (CRS) is a mathematical salivary diagnostic model to define an individual’s risk of having periodontitis. In order to further validate this salivary biomarker, we investigated how periodontal bacteria, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and systemic and local host immune responses relate to CRS. Subgingival plaque, saliva, and serum samples collected from 445 individuals were used in the analyses. Plaque levels of 28 microbial species, especially those of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Tannerella forsythia, and serum and salivary levels of IgA and IgG against these five species were determined. Additionally, LPS activity was measured. High CRS associated strongly with all IgA/IgG antibody and LPS levels in saliva, whereas in serum the associations were not that obvious. In the final logistic regression model, the best predictors of high CRS were saliva IgA burden against the five species (OR 7.04, 95% CI 2.25–22.0), IgG burden (3.79, 1.78–8.08), LPS (2.19, 1.38–3.47), and the sum of 17 subgingival Gram-negative species (6.19, 2.10–18.3). CRS is strongly associated with microbial biomarker species of periodontitis and salivary humoral immune responses against them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Peri-Implant Point-of-Care Tests)
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