Fluorescence Optical Imaging—2nd Edition

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Optical Diagnostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 2380

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Gachon University, Seongnam-si 13120, Republic of Korea
2. Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Gachon Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology (GAIHST), Gachon University, Seongnam-si 13120, Republic of Korea
Interests: fluorescence optical imaging; biomarker; medical device; fluorescence device
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, indocyanine green fluorescence has been established as a useful tool with which to assess perfusion in diagnosis fluorescence devices. We are inviting submissions to this Special Issue on fluorescence optical imaging. This area of research has experienced rapid growth over the last ten years. This growth derives, in part, from light-based modalities being non-invasive, safe, and relatively inexpensive, with diagnostic potential. Advances in light sources, detectors, modulation schemes, beam-shaping approaches, and numerical algorithms are enabling the development of imaging methods for probing diseases in different body organs. This Special Issue will explore where we are and what the future holds in this exciting area of human-health-related research, as well as how fluorescence optical imaging can be used to treat various diseases. To that end, we invite submissions involving new techniques, methods, applications, and results, as well as review articles. Recently, NIR cameras and fluorescent imaging devices have been studied with a variety of ideas, as well as pathological imaging, and uses in surgical neuroimaging microscopes. Fluorescent methods are also actively used in the laparoscope and eye imaging areas. Therefore, optical imaging content related to fluorescent and optic images is important. Fluorescent imaging has been expanding and becoming more accurate with artificial intelligence imaging. Papers related to the fluorescence optical imaging of multiple people are particularly welcome.

Prof. Dr. Kwang Gi Kim
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • medical diagnosis
  • 5 ALA fluorescence
  • yellow dye fluorescence
  • indocyanine green fluorescence
  • optical diagnosis imaging
  • laparoscopic imaging device
  • endoscope device
  • eye imaging device
  • diffuse optical imaging and tomography
  • optical coherence tomography
  • nonlinear optical imaging: multiphoton microscopy, higher harmonic generation approaches
  • multimodal imaging
  • photoacoustic imaging
  • functional in vivo imaging
  • brain, breast, and prostate imaging
  • high-resolution neuroimaging
  • nanoparticles and contrast-agent-enhanced imaging
  • spectral imaging for tissue and cellular pathology.

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 9107 KiB  
Article
Near-Infrared In Vivo Imaging of Claudin-1 Expression by Orthotopically Implanted Patient-Derived Colonic Adenoma Organoids
by Sangeeta Jaiswal, Fa Wang, Xiaoli Wu, Tse-Shao Chang, Ahmad Shirazi, Miki Lee, Michael K. Dame, Jason R. Spence and Thomas D. Wang
Diagnostics 2024, 14(3), 273; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics14030273 - 26 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1057
Abstract
Background: Claudin-1 becomes overexpressed during the transformation of normal colonic mucosa to colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: Patient-derived organoids expressed clinically relevant target levels and genetic heterogeneity, and were established from human adenoma and normal colons. Colonoids were implanted orthotopically in the colon of [...] Read more.
Background: Claudin-1 becomes overexpressed during the transformation of normal colonic mucosa to colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods: Patient-derived organoids expressed clinically relevant target levels and genetic heterogeneity, and were established from human adenoma and normal colons. Colonoids were implanted orthotopically in the colon of immunocompromised mice. This pre-clinical model of CRC provides an intact microenvironment and representative vasculature. Colonoid growth was monitored using white light endoscopy. A peptide specific for claudin-1 was fluorescently labeled for intravenous administration. NIR fluorescence images were collected using endoscopy and endomicroscopy. Results: NIR fluorescence images collected using wide-field endoscopy showed a significantly greater target-to-background (T/B) ratio for adenoma versus normal (1.89 ± 0.35 and 1.26 ± 0.06) colonoids at 1 h post-injection. These results were confirmed by optical sections collected using endomicroscopy. Optical sections were collected in vivo with sub-cellular resolution in vertical and horizontal planes. Greater claudin-1 expression by individual epithelial cells in adenomatous versus normal crypts was visualized. A human-specific cytokeratin stain ex vivo verified the presence of human tissues implanted adjacent to normal mouse colonic mucosa. Conclusions: Increased claudin-1 expression was observed from adenoma versus normal colonoids in vivo using imaging with wide field endoscopy and endomicrosopy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence Optical Imaging—2nd Edition)
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16 pages, 9137 KiB  
Article
Single Quasi–Symmetrical LED with High Intensity and Wide Beam Width Using Diamond–Shaped Mirror Refraction Method for Surgical Fluorescence Microscope Applications
by Minki Ju, Kicheol Yoon, Sangyun Lee and Kwang Gi Kim
Diagnostics 2023, 13(17), 2763; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics13172763 - 25 Aug 2023
Viewed by 996
Abstract
To remove tumors with the same blood vessel color, observation is performed using a surgical microscope through fluorescent staining. Therefore, surgical microscopes use light emitting diode (LED) emission and excitation wavelengths to induce fluorescence emission wavelengths. LEDs used in hand–held type microscopes have [...] Read more.
To remove tumors with the same blood vessel color, observation is performed using a surgical microscope through fluorescent staining. Therefore, surgical microscopes use light emitting diode (LED) emission and excitation wavelengths to induce fluorescence emission wavelengths. LEDs used in hand–held type microscopes have a beam irradiation range of 10° and a weak power of less than 0.5 mW. Therefore, fluorescence emission is difficult. This study proposes to increase the beam width and power of LED by utilizing the quasi–symmetrical beam irradiation method. Commercial LED irradiates a beam 1/r2 distance away from the target (working distance). To obtain the fluorescence emission probability, set up four mirrors. The distance between the mirrors and the LED is 5.9 cm, and the distance between the mirrors and the target is 2.95 cm. The commercial LED reached power on target of 8.0 pW within the wavelength band of 405 nm. The power reaching the target is 0.60 mW in the wavelength band of 405 nm for the LED with the beam mirror attachment method using the quasi–symmetrical beam irradiation method. This result is expected to be sufficient for fluorescence emission. The light power of the mirror was increased by approximately four times. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence Optical Imaging—2nd Edition)
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