Special Issue "Recent Progress in Lithium Niobate"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystalline Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Robert A. Jackson Website E-Mail
Keele University, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Keele, United Kingdom
Interests: computer modelling; interatomic potentials; optical materials; defects and dopants
Guest Editor
Dr. Zsuzsanna Szaller Website E-Mail
Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Budapest, Hungary
Interests: single crystal growth; high-temperature top-seeded solution growth; non-faceted growth; stoichiometric LiNbO3; optical damage resistant dopants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This planned special issue of Crystals is the third issue devoted to LiNbO3 (the previous two being on ‘Lithium Niobate Crystals’ and ‘Thin Films and Nanocrystals’).

LiNbO3 is an all-star material from both the scientific and technological viewpoints and the subject of a great number of publications since its first preparation in 1937. Due to its excellent electro/acousto-optical properties, LiNbO3 has been widely used in optoelectronic devices for decades, ranging from optical fibre communications to wireless and micromechanical systems. Among the latest applications are modulators and filters with lasers on a single LiNbO3 wafer, especially promising in integrated optics. Recently, high quality low optical loss source material for waveguides such as lithium niobate on insulator (LNOI) is playing an important role in photonic integrated circuits. LiNbO3 provides powerful optical components in high-energy laser applications, in terahertz technology and is also the subject of lead-free piezoceramics and nanophotonics.

The different applications require different forms of LiNbO3 such as bulk, thin film, nanocrystal and composite. In this Special Issue studies are welcomed dealing with different preparation techniques of different forms of LiNbO3, theoretical and experimental investigations of their structure and research on specific developments and novel applications.

Dr. Robert A. Jackson
Dr. Zsuzsanna Szaller
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Crystal growth
  • Crystal defects
  • Computer modelling
  • Nanocrystals and nanopowders
  • Thin films
  • Composites
  • Lithium niobate waveguides
  • Integrated optics
  • Nonlinear optics
  • Photonics
  • Photovoltaics
  • THz-wave generation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
An Integrated Photonic Electric-Field Sensor Utilizing a 1 × 2 YBB Mach-Zehnder Interferometric Modulator with a Titanium-Diffused Lithium Niobate Waveguide and a Dipole Patch Antenna
Crystals 2019, 9(9), 459; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9090459 - 02 Sep 2019
Abstract
We studied photonic electric-field sensors using a 1 × 2 YBB-MZI modulator composed of two complementary outputs and a 3 dB directional coupler based on the electro-optic effect and titanium diffused lithium–niobate optical waveguides. The measured DC switching voltage and extinction ratio at [...] Read more.
We studied photonic electric-field sensors using a 1 × 2 YBB-MZI modulator composed of two complementary outputs and a 3 dB directional coupler based on the electro-optic effect and titanium diffused lithium–niobate optical waveguides. The measured DC switching voltage and extinction ratio at the wavelength 1.3 μm were ~16.6 V and ~14.7 dB, respectively. The minimum detectable fields were ~1.12 V/m and ~3.3 V/m, corresponding to the ~22 dB and ~18 dB dynamic ranges of ~10 MHz and 50 MHz, respectively, for an rf power of 20 dBm. The sensor shows an almost linear response to the applied electric-field strength within the range of 0.29 V/m to 29.8 V/m. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Lithium Niobate)
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Open AccessArticle
Determination of the Chemical Composition of Lithium Niobate Powders
Crystals 2019, 9(7), 340; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9070340 - 03 Jul 2019
Abstract
Existent methods for determining the composition of lithium niobate single crystals are mainly based on their variations due to changes in their electronic structure, which accounts for the fact that most of these methods rely on experimental techniques using light as the probe. [...] Read more.
Existent methods for determining the composition of lithium niobate single crystals are mainly based on their variations due to changes in their electronic structure, which accounts for the fact that most of these methods rely on experimental techniques using light as the probe. Nevertheless, these methods used for single crystals fail in accurately predicting the chemical composition of lithium niobate powders due to strong scattering effects and randomness. In this work, an innovative method for determining the chemical composition of lithium niobate powders, based mainly on the probing of secondary thermodynamic phases by X-ray diffraction analysis and structure refinement, is employed. Its validation is supported by the characterization of several samples synthesized by the standard and inexpensive method of mechanosynthesis. Furthermore, new linear equations are proposed to accurately describe and determine the chemical composition of this type of powdered material. The composition can now be determined by using any of four standard characterization techniques: X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy (RS), UV-vis Diffuse Reflectance (DR), and Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). In the case of the existence of a previous equivalent description for single crystals, a brief analysis of the literature is made. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Lithium Niobate)
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Open AccessArticle
Mechanochemical Reactions of Lithium Niobate Induced by High-Energy Ball-Milling
Crystals 2019, 9(7), 334; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9070334 - 28 Jun 2019
Abstract
Lithium niobate (LiNbO3, LN) nanocrystals were prepared by ball-milling of the crucible residue of a Czochralski grown congruent single crystal, using a Spex 8000 Mixer Mill with different types of vials (stainless steel, alumina, tungsten carbide) and various milling parameters. Dynamic [...] Read more.
Lithium niobate (LiNbO3, LN) nanocrystals were prepared by ball-milling of the crucible residue of a Czochralski grown congruent single crystal, using a Spex 8000 Mixer Mill with different types of vials (stainless steel, alumina, tungsten carbide) and various milling parameters. Dynamic light scattering and powder X-ray diffraction were used to determine the achieved particle and grain sizes, respectively. Possible contamination from the vials was checked by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements. Milling resulted in sample darkening due to mechanochemical reduction of Nb (V) via polaron and bipolaron formation, oxygen release and Li2O segregation, while subsequent oxidizing heat-treatments recovered the white color with the evaporation of Li2O and crystallization of a LiNb3O8 phase instead. The phase transformations occurring during both the grinding and the post-grinding heat treatments were studied by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical reflection measurement, while the Li2O content of the as-ground samples was quantitatively measured by coulometric titration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Lithium Niobate)
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Open AccessArticle
The Photorefractive Response of Zn and Mo Codoped LiNbO3 in the Visible Region
Crystals 2019, 9(5), 228; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9050228 - 28 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
We mainly investigated the effect of the valence state of photorefractive resistant elements on the photorefractive properties of codoped crystals, taking the Zn and Mo codoped LiNbO3 (LN:Mo,Zn) crystal as an example. Especially, the response time and photorefractive sensitivity of 7.2 mol% [...] Read more.
We mainly investigated the effect of the valence state of photorefractive resistant elements on the photorefractive properties of codoped crystals, taking the Zn and Mo codoped LiNbO3 (LN:Mo,Zn) crystal as an example. Especially, the response time and photorefractive sensitivity of 7.2 mol% Zn and 0.5 mol% Mo codoped with LiNbO3 (LN:Mo,Zn7.2) crystal are 0.65 s and 4.35 cm/J at 442 nm, respectively. The photorefractive properties of the LN:Mo,Zn crystal are similar to the Mg and Mo codoped LiNbO3 crystal, which are better than the Zr and Mo codoped LiNbO3 crystal. The results show that the valence state of photorefractive resistant ions is an important factor for the photorefractive properties of codoped crystals and that the LN:Mo,Zn7.2 crystal is another potential material with fast response to holographic storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Lithium Niobate)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Investigation of ceramics BiNbO4 doped by ions of Fe and Mn by ESR spectroscopy

Authors: Vladimir P. Lyutoev1, Nadezhda A. Zhuk2

affiliation: 1 IG Komi SC UB RAS, Pervomaiskaya Str. 54, Syktyvkar, 167982, Russia
2 Syktyvkar State University, Oktyabrskiy Ave. 55, Syktyvkar, 167001, Russia

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