Special Issue "Nanocomposite Coatings"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Quanshun Luo

Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, S1 1WB Sheffield, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +44-114-225-3649
Interests: hard coatings; nitrided steels; shot-peened surfaces; and wear resistant metal alloys; materials characterization by analytical transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy; scanning electron microscpy; and X-ray diffraction; mechanical testing; tribological testing; and residual stress measurement
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Feng Huang

Ningbo Institute o Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: thin films and hard coatings; PVD surface engineering; coating characterization and testing; advanced coatings for harsh conditions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In thin films and coatings, the term ‘nanocomposite’ emerged from the combined concepts of ‘nano-structured’ and ‘composite’ or ‘multi-phase’. Several synthesis techniques are applied to grow such coatings. Nanocomposite coatings, having their structure and thereafter the physical and chemical characteristics different from those with micro-scale structures, have been repeatedly demonstrated to possess excellent mechanical, tribological and anti-corrosion properties. In recent years, research focus is addressed in the fabrication methods, the growth kinetics and microstructure characterization, and properties related to their industrial applications.

The scope of this Special Issue is to provide a platform to the researchers and practitioners from both academics and industry to share their state-of-the-art developments in the field.  We would like to invite papers on the processing, characterization and testing, properties, industrial applications of coatings or thin films, which have nano-crystalline or nanocomposite structures. The contributed papers could be original research articles, letters, and reviews of latest research progress.

In particular, the topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Synthesis by physical vapor deposition (PVD), chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and chemical or electro-chemical methods;
  • Characterization of structure, chemical compositions, surface and interface;
  • Mechanical testing;
  • Residual stresses;
  • Thermal stability and corrosion behavior as well as related mechanisms;
  • Wear and friction as well as related mechanisms;
  • Characterization techniques, e.g., electron microscopy, spectroscopy, and diffraction;
  • Performance of nanocomposite coatings in industrial applications, e.g., machining tool protection, corrosion protection, and in elevated temperatures;
  • Nanocomposite coatings and thin films for other novel applications.

Dr. Quanshun Luo
Prof. Dr. Feng Huang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Increase in Efficiency of End Milling of Titanium Alloys Due to Tools with Multilayered Composite Nano-Structured Zr-ZrN-(Zr,Al)N and Zr-ZrN-(Zr,Cr,Al)N Coatings
Coatings 2018, 8(11), 395; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8110395
Received: 22 October 2018 / Revised: 2 November 2018 / Accepted: 10 November 2018 / Published: 10 November 2018
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Abstract
The study deals with an increase in the tool life parameter for metal-cutting tools and efficiency of end milling for titanium alloys, due to the use of tools with multilayered composite nano-structured Zr–ZrN–(Zr,Al)N and Zr–ZrN–(Zr,Cr,Al)N coatings, deposited through the technology of the filtered
[...] Read more.
The study deals with an increase in the tool life parameter for metal-cutting tools and efficiency of end milling for titanium alloys, due to the use of tools with multilayered composite nano-structured Zr–ZrN–(Zr,Al)N and Zr–ZrN–(Zr,Cr,Al)N coatings, deposited through the technology of the filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition (FCVAD). The studies included the microstructured investigations using SEM, the analysis of chemical composition (Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, EDXS), the determination of the value of critical failure force (with the use of scratch testing), and the measurement of the microhardness of the coatings under study. The cutting tests were conducted in end milling of titanium alloys at various cutting speeds. The mechanisms of wear and failure for end milling cutters with the coatings under study were studied in milling. The studies determined the advantages of using a tool with the coatings under study compared to an uncoated tool, as well as to tools with the commercial Ti–TiN coating and the nano-structured Ti–TiN–(Ti,Al)N coating. Adding Cr to the composition of the coating can significantly increase the hardness, while the coating retains sufficient ductility and brittle fracture resistance, which allows for a best result when milling titanium alloys. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocomposite Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle Electrodeposition Behavior of Polycrystalline Ni–Mo–La Composite in Alkaline Solution
Coatings 2018, 8(9), 299; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8090299
Received: 7 June 2018 / Revised: 9 August 2018 / Accepted: 12 August 2018 / Published: 24 August 2018
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Abstract
The polycrystalline Ni–Mo–La composite coating was obtained by electrodeposition through the addition of La3+ ions into Ni, Mo ions main salt weak alkaline solution. The obtained composite contain 0.92 at.% La. According to the law of ionic activity, the redox reaction of
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The polycrystalline Ni–Mo–La composite coating was obtained by electrodeposition through the addition of La3+ ions into Ni, Mo ions main salt weak alkaline solution. The obtained composite contain 0.92 at.% La. According to the law of ionic activity, the redox reaction of three kinds of metal atoms was studied by polarography and cyclic voltammetry. It was found that the addition of lanthanum ions changed the composite structural, phase, and element, and the OH ions were deduced during the electrodeposition in alkaline solution. The introduction of lanthanum and molybdenum ions negatively shifted the reduction potential of nickel ions and broadened the peaks significantly in the deposition process, retarding the reduction and deposition rate of Ni ions, which was characterized by a multi-step reduction process of Mo and La metal atoms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocomposite Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle The Effect of Laser Power on the Interface Microstructure of a Laser Remelting Nano-SiC Modified Fe-Based Ni/WC Composite Coating
Coatings 2018, 8(9), 297; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8090297
Received: 4 July 2018 / Revised: 15 August 2018 / Accepted: 19 August 2018 / Published: 22 August 2018
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Abstract
The plasma sprayed Fe-based Ni/WC composite coating on the surface of 45 steel was post-treated by laser remelting with the addition of nano-SiC. The effect of laser power on the interface microstructure of a laser remelting nano-SiC modified Fe-based Ni/WC composite coatings were
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The plasma sprayed Fe-based Ni/WC composite coating on the surface of 45 steel was post-treated by laser remelting with the addition of nano-SiC. The effect of laser power on the interface microstructure of a laser remelting nano-SiC modified Fe-based Ni/WC composite coatings were researched. The metallographic structure, microscopic morphology, phase composition, and microhardness of the remelted layer were visually analyzed by metallographic microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and microhardness tester, respectively. The results showed that the nano-SiC modified remelted coating was smooth and compact, and with no fine cracks. The remelted layer was mainly composed of [Fe,Ni], Cr, Fe0.04Ni0.36 phase. The metal elements Fe, Ni, Cr, and Si, and non-metallic element C, appeared to diffuse, and there was metallurgical bonding between the coating and the matrix. With the increase of laser power, the smaller the average grain size, the wider the half-peak height (FWHM), and the more obvious the grain refinement. When the laser power was 500 W, the interface metallurgical showed the best effect. Furthermore, the nano-sized SiC particles served as the core of the heterogeneous nucleation to refine the grains on the one hand, and promoted the formation of a hard intermediate phase in the coating on the other hand. Therefore, the laser remelting and the addition of nano-SiC particles greatly improved the microhardness of the coating. The larger the laser power, the smaller the microstructure characteristics and the fewer the number of holes. With increasing laser power, the hardness increased in general terms and the maximum hardness increased by 51%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocomposite Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle The Tribocorrosion and Corrosion Properties of Thermally Oxidized Ti6Al4V Alloy in 0.9 wt.% NaCl Physiological Saline
Coatings 2018, 8(8), 285; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8080285
Received: 13 June 2018 / Revised: 9 August 2018 / Accepted: 12 August 2018 / Published: 16 August 2018
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Abstract
Thermal oxidation of Ti6Al4V was carried out at 700 °C for 5 h in air atmosphere. The characteristics of morphology and structure, micro-hardness, and tribocorrosion behavior in 0.9 wt.% NaCl solution of thermally oxidized Ti6Al4V alloys were investigated and compared with those of
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Thermal oxidation of Ti6Al4V was carried out at 700 °C for 5 h in air atmosphere. The characteristics of morphology and structure, micro-hardness, and tribocorrosion behavior in 0.9 wt.% NaCl solution of thermally oxidized Ti6Al4V alloys were investigated and compared with those of the untreated one. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) and glow discharge spectrometer (GDS) results reveal that the oxide layer is completely coated on the substrate, which is a bilayer structure consisted of oxide film and oxygen diffusion zone (ODZ). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman measurements reveal the rutile phase as the dominant phase. The micro-hardness and surface roughness (Ra) increase about 1.63 and 4 times than those of the untreated one. Thermally oxidized sample obtains corrosion and tribocorrosion resistance property in 0.9 wt.% NaCl solution. The corrosion potential has a more than 500 mV anodic shift, the corrosion current density decreases about 80%. The total material loss volume is reduced by almost an order of magnitude under tribocorrosion behavior, which is due to the improvement of the micro-hardness of the oxide layer and ODZ that reduce the corrosion and the synergistic effect of corrosion and wear. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocomposite Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle UHMWPE Nanocomposite Coatings Reinforced with Alumina (Al2O3) Nanoparticles for Tribological Applications
Coatings 2018, 8(8), 280; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8080280
Received: 28 July 2018 / Revised: 8 August 2018 / Accepted: 12 August 2018 / Published: 14 August 2018
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Abstract
Due to a growing demand for protecting metallic components from wear and tear, polymer coatings are being extensively researched and developed as one of the most effective and efficient solutions to reduce friction and wear in demanding tribological applications. The present study focuses
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Due to a growing demand for protecting metallic components from wear and tear, polymer coatings are being extensively researched and developed as one of the most effective and efficient solutions to reduce friction and wear in demanding tribological applications. The present study focuses on developing a polymer nanocomposite coating of ultra-high molecular polyethylene (UHMWPE) reinforced with different loadings (0.5, 3, 5, and 10 wt %) of alumina to protect steel surfaces. Wear tests were conducted on the coated samples using a tribometer with a ball-on-disk configuration, sliding against a 440C hardened stainless steel ball as a counterface to evaluate the wear life and the load-bearing capacity of the developed coatings. Micro-indentation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical profilometry techniques were used to characterize the coatings in terms of hardness, dispersion of the nanofillers, morphology, and wear mechanisms, respectively. Results showed that the UHMWPE nanocomposite coating reinforced with 3 wt % and 5 wt % of alumina did not fail, even until 250,000 cycles at a normal load of 12 N and a linear speed of 0.1 m/s, showing a significant improvement in wear resistance as compared to the pristine UHMWPE coating. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocomposite Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Laser Scanning Speed on the Wear Behavior of Nano-SiC-Modified Fe/WC Composite Coatings by Laser Remelting
Coatings 2018, 8(7), 241; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8070241
Received: 6 June 2018 / Revised: 24 June 2018 / Accepted: 28 June 2018 / Published: 7 July 2018
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Abstract
A supersonic plasma sprayed nano-SiC-modified WC/Fe metal–cermet composite coating was remelted with a fibre-pulsed laser at four different laser scanning speeds (100, 150, 200 and 250 mm·min−1) while the other parameters were kept constant. The microstructures, microhardness, and tribological properties of
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A supersonic plasma sprayed nano-SiC-modified WC/Fe metal–cermet composite coating was remelted with a fibre-pulsed laser at four different laser scanning speeds (100, 150, 200 and 250 mm·min−1) while the other parameters were kept constant. The microstructures, microhardness, and tribological properties of the coatings were analysed by means of SEM (scanning electron microscopy), XRD (X-ray diffractometer), and a friction tester, respectively. The results show that, when the laser scanning speed is 100 mm·min−1, the remelted coating is most dense with regard to the coverage of the substrate. The coating with nano-particles became more smooth, and elements Si and C in the nano-particles reacted with Fe, Ni, or Cr and formed a hard mesophase that enhanced the strength and hardness of the coating. With the increase of laser scanning speed, the hardness of the four coatings increased first and then decreased, and the nano-SiC-modified remelted coating showed a maximum microhardness of about HV0.51350, and the nano-particles made the coating’s micro-structure finer, at a laser scanning speed of 150 mm·min−1. The friction coefficient and wear rate of the four coatings were 0.58 and 12.01 × 10−5 mm3/(N·m), 0.21 and 8.50 × 10−5 mm3/(N·m), 0.62 and 20.04 × 10−5 mm3/(N·m), and 1.23 and 25.13 × 10−5 mm3/(N·m). The remelted coating at a laser scanning speed of 150 mm·min−1 exhibits the best wear resistance and its wear mechanism is governed by slight adhesion wear and plastic deformation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocomposite Coatings)
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