Special Issue "Design and Synthesis of Hard Coatings"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (17 October 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Grégory Abadias

Institut Pprime – CNRS – Université de Poitiers, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, 86962 Chasseneuil-Futuroscope France
E-Mail
Phone: +33-549-496-748
Interests: thin film growth; magnetron sputtering; nanostructured thin films; multilayers; nitride hard coatings; stress and mechanical properties; multiscale modeling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue on “Design and Synthesis of Hard Coatings” is to present the latest experimental and theoretical developments in the growth design and tailoring of hard coatings’ nano- and microstructures to enhance their mechanical and functional properties. Hard coatings based on nitrides, oxides, oxynitrides, borides, and carbides are now routinely synthesized by vapor depostion techniques to improve the performance of tools, machine parts, or devices in terms of mechanical strength, wear, and resistance to harsh environnement (oxidation, corrosive media, high temperature and pressure, ion irradiation). Efficient strategies, including new processing routes and new design concepts (e.g., interface engineering, multicomponent alloying), based on a chemical/structural tailoring of the coatings, must be devised to go beyond convential hard coatings. Synthesis methods will cover physical and chemical vapor deposition, including advanced or emerging techniques, such as high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS), ion-assisted deposition, glancing angle deposition, or atmospheric plasma.

This Special Issue will encompass original research papers and review articles from leading groups around the world. In particular, the topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Combinatorial approach in thin film deposition
  • Theory-guided design of hard coatings: quantum-mechanical calculations, multi-scale modeling, etc.
  • Multicomponent alloying and phase tuning
  • Interface design: multilayers and superlattices, nanocomposites
  • Functionally-graded hard coatings
  • Real-time and in situ growth monitoring
  • Coatings with improved hardness and toughness, thermal stability and oxidation resistance, radiation tolerance, etc.

Looking forward to receiving your original scientific contributions (full paper, communication or review article) to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Grégory Abadias
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Growth of NbC Thin Film Using CH4 as a Carbon Source and Reducing Agent
Coatings 2018, 8(11), 379; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8110379
Received: 16 August 2018 / Revised: 17 October 2018 / Accepted: 23 October 2018 / Published: 24 October 2018
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Abstract
Transition metal carbides (TMCs) have high melting points, hardness, and chemical stabilities in acidic media. In this work, a chemical vapor deposition method using CH4 as a carbon source and reducing agent was employed to make an NbC film. NbCl5 carried
[...] Read more.
Transition metal carbides (TMCs) have high melting points, hardness, and chemical stabilities in acidic media. In this work, a chemical vapor deposition method using CH4 as a carbon source and reducing agent was employed to make an NbC film. NbCl5 carried by Ar gas was used as an Nb precursor. An NbC thin film, deposited on a c-plane sapphire, exhibited a preferential orientation of the (111) plane, which can be explained by domain-matching epitaxy. A nanoindentation test showed that the NbC film with the preferential orientation of the (111) plane was stronger than that with a random orientation. Moreover, the results showed that H2, which is conventionally used as a reducing agent in NbC synthesis, degraded the crystallinity and hardness of the fabricated NbC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Synthesis of Hard Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle The Role of Thin-Film Vacuum-Plasma Coatings and Their Influence on the Efficiency of Ceramic Cutting Inserts
Coatings 2018, 8(8), 287; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8080287
Received: 20 June 2018 / Revised: 17 July 2018 / Accepted: 6 August 2018 / Published: 17 August 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (7760 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The main problem with ceramics used in cutting tools is related to the unpredictable failures caused by the brittle fracturing of ceramic inserts, which is critical for the intermittent milling of cyclic loading. A 125-mm-diameter eight-toothed end mill, with a mechanical fastening of
[...] Read more.
The main problem with ceramics used in cutting tools is related to the unpredictable failures caused by the brittle fracturing of ceramic inserts, which is critical for the intermittent milling of cyclic loading. A 125-mm-diameter eight-toothed end mill, with a mechanical fastening of ceramic inserts, was used as a cutting tool for milling hardened steel (102Cr6). For the experiments, square inserts of the Al2O3 + SiC ceramic were used and compared with the samples made of Al2O3 + TiC to confirm the obtained results. The samples were coated with diamond-like coating (DLC), TiZrN, and TiCrAlN coatings, and their bending strength and adhesion were investigated. Investigations into the friction coefficient of the samples and operational tests were also carried out. The effect of smoothing the microroughness and surface defects in comparison with uncoated inserts, which are characteristic of the abrasive processing of ceramics, was investigated and analyzed. The process developed by the authors of the coating process allows for the cleaning and activation of the surface of ceramic inserts using high-energy gas atoms. The impact of these particles on the cutting edge of the insert ensures its sharpening and reduces the radius of curvature of its cutting edges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Synthesis of Hard Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle Mechanical Properties of Zr–Si–N Films Fabricated through HiPIMS/RFMS Co-Sputtering
Coatings 2018, 8(8), 263; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8080263
Received: 1 July 2018 / Revised: 21 July 2018 / Accepted: 26 July 2018 / Published: 27 July 2018
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Abstract
Zr–Si–N films were fabricated through the co-deposition of high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and radio-frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS). The mechanical properties of the films fabricated using various nitrogen flow rates and radio-frequency powers were investigated. The HiPIMS/RFMS co-sputtered Zr–Si–N films were under-stoichiometric. These
[...] Read more.
Zr–Si–N films were fabricated through the co-deposition of high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and radio-frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS). The mechanical properties of the films fabricated using various nitrogen flow rates and radio-frequency powers were investigated. The HiPIMS/RFMS co-sputtered Zr–Si–N films were under-stoichiometric. These films with Si content of less than 9 at.%, and N content of less than 43 at.% displayed a face-centered cubic structure. The films’ hardness and Young’s modulus exhibited an evident relationship to their compressive residual stresses. The films with 2–6 at.% Si exhibited high hardness of 33–34 GPa and high Young’s moduli of 346–373 GPa, which was accompanied with compressive residual stresses from −4.4 to −5.0 GPa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Synthesis of Hard Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of TaN Thin Films Prepared by Reactive Magnetron Sputtering
Coatings 2017, 7(12), 209; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7120209
Received: 7 October 2017 / Revised: 15 November 2017 / Accepted: 20 November 2017 / Published: 23 November 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (8322 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Reactive magnetron sputtering was used to deposit tantalum nitride (Ta–N) thin films on Si substrate. The effect of varying the N2 percentage in the N2/Ar gas mixture on the Ta–N film characteristics was investigated. Mechanical and tribological properties were studied
[...] Read more.
Reactive magnetron sputtering was used to deposit tantalum nitride (Ta–N) thin films on Si substrate. The effect of varying the N2 percentage in the N2/Ar gas mixture on the Ta–N film characteristics was investigated. Mechanical and tribological properties were studied using nanoindentation and pin-on-disc wear testing. Decreasing the N2 content in the gas mixture was found to change the film structure from face centered cubic (fcc) TaN (from 25% to 10% N2) to highly textured fcc TaN (at 7% N2) to a mixture of fcc TaN1.13 and hexagonal Ta2N (at 5% N2), and finally to hexagonal Ta2N (at 3% N2). A high hardness of about 33 GPa was shown by the films containing the hexagonal Ta2N phase (5% and 3% N2). Decreasing the N2 content below 7% N2 was also found to result in microstructural refinement with grain size 5–15 nm. Besides the highest hardness, the film deposited with 3% N2 content exhibited the highest hardness/modulus ratio (0.13), and elastic recovery (68%), and very low wear rate (3.1 × 10−6 mm3·N−1·m−1). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Synthesis of Hard Coatings)
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