Corrosion and Corrosion Prevention in Extreme Environments

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Corrosion, Wear and Erosion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 3390

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. National Corrosion and Materials Reliability Laboratory, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77840, USA
2. Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
Interests: materials selection; passivity; environmentally assisted cracking; severe service conditions

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Guest Editor
Institute of Special Environments Physical Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology (Shenzhen), Shenzhen 518055, China
Interests: corrosion behavior of materials in extreme environments; irradiation performance of reactor fuels and materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the technological needs of society and industry have pushed metallic alloys into service conditions for which there is little notable research, particular in relation to corrosion resistance performance. These extreme service conditions include combinations of high pressure and temperature for which there are a lack of experimental data to support known models and mechanisms for different corrosion damage mechanism. Conducting the necessary research in these extreme service conditions also requires that significant experimental challenges be overcome.

This Special Issue aims to provide a forum for bleeding-edge research on corrosion in extreme service conditions. Potential topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • Theoretical and experimental studies that support or introduce new theories to explain corrosion phenomena observed in extreme service applications.
  • Research assessing application envelopes for metallic alloys in extreme service conditions, considering different degradation mechanisms.
  • Evaluation of corrosion damage accumulation mitigation methodologies in extreme service applications.
  • Development of modelling and associated algorithms for predictive assessment of the consequences of alloys degradation in extreme service conditions.

Prof. Dr. Raymundo Case
Dr. Hongsheng Chen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • passivity
  • supercritical conditions
  • high-temperature corrosion
  • marine corrosion
  • space radiation failure
  • corrosion-related failure behavior metallic alloys
  • corrosion control
  • corrosion modelling

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 12458 KiB  
Article
Temporal and Spatial Variation Study on Corrosion of High-Strength Steel Wires in the Suspender of CFST Arch Bridge
by Luming Deng and Yulin Deng
Coatings 2024, 14(5), 628; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings14050628 - 16 May 2024
Viewed by 586
Abstract
The corrosion and degradation behavior of high-strength steel wires during service directly affect the safety and usability of suspenders in steel pipe concrete arch bridges. In this study, three different types of specimens were fabricated using steel wires extracted from the suspenders of [...] Read more.
The corrosion and degradation behavior of high-strength steel wires during service directly affect the safety and usability of suspenders in steel pipe concrete arch bridges. In this study, three different types of specimens were fabricated using steel wires extracted from the suspenders of an 11-year-old in-service arch bridge and subjected to accelerated corrosion tests with acetic acid. Considering the differential diffusion processes of corrosion factors caused by varying degrees of damage to the suspender sheath, the spatial corrosion variability of steel wires at different positions within the suspender cross-section was investigated. Experimental results indicated a two-stage characteristic in the corrosion process of individual galvanized steel wire samples. In the first corrosion stage, the microstructure on the corroded steel wire surface evolved from a dense crystalline structure to a porous one. In the second corrosion stage, corrosion products accumulate on the steel wire substrate, subsequently further aggregating into sheet-like structures. The maximum pitting factor of individual steel wire samples from a specific area could be described by a Type I extreme value distribution. In the time-dependent model that was established, the location parameter and scale parameter exhibited an exponential decrease during the first corrosion stage and a linear decrease during the second corrosion stage. In the absence of sheath protection, the coefficient of variation in corrosion among adjacent steel wires in the suspender followed a normal distribution. The spatial corrosion variability of the wires inside the suspender is significantly influenced by the shape of the suspender sheath damage. As the corrosion time increased, the overall discrepancy in corrosion levels among different layers of wires diminished. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion and Corrosion Prevention in Extreme Environments)
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19 pages, 9550 KiB  
Article
Effect of Coating on Stress Corrosion Performance of Bridge Cable Steel Wire
by Zeling Zhang, Linfeng Wang, Shenyou Song, Liang Tang, Hailiang Zhang, Hao Zhou and Feng Fang
Coatings 2023, 13(8), 1339; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13081339 - 29 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1324
Abstract
Hot galvanization on steel surfaces can isolate the steel from corrosive environments and alleviate the stress corrosion cracking caused by the anodic dissolution mechanism. However, the cathodic protection potential of the coating is excessively negative, which may aggravate the hydrogen embrittlement problem. The [...] Read more.
Hot galvanization on steel surfaces can isolate the steel from corrosive environments and alleviate the stress corrosion cracking caused by the anodic dissolution mechanism. However, the cathodic protection potential of the coating is excessively negative, which may aggravate the hydrogen embrittlement problem. The effect of a coating on the stress corrosion performance of bridge cable wire was studied by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS), a thermal desorption analysis (TDA), an electrochemical workstation, and an FIP test. The results show that hot-dip ZnAl and ZnAlMg alloy coatings can significantly prolong the stress corrosion fracture time of steel wire substrates. From a macroscopic perspective, the stress corrosion cracking fracture is a brittle fracture caused by hydrogen embrittlement. Moreover, the coating type has little effect on the fracture morphology of bridge cable wire. In NH4SCN solution (50 °C, 20 wt.%), a corrosion product layer composed of ZnS and Al2O3 was formed on the surface of the coated steel wire. The electrochemical analysis showed that the corrosion resistance of the ZnAlMg coating was better than that of the ZnAl coating, which was the main reason for the improvement of the stress corrosion performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion and Corrosion Prevention in Extreme Environments)
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Review

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20 pages, 4637 KiB  
Review
The Role of Rare Earths on Steel and Rare Earth Steel Corrosion Mechanism of Research Progress
by Yuzhen Bai, Shujia Zheng, Na Liu, Yang Liu, Xiaoning Wang, Lina Qiu and Aijun Gong
Coatings 2024, 14(4), 465; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings14040465 - 11 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1016
Abstract
Corrosion has always been an important factor affecting the life of steel, which causes huge economic losses every year. How to improve the corrosion resistance of steel has always been a research focus. Adding rare earth elements into steel is an important method [...] Read more.
Corrosion has always been an important factor affecting the life of steel, which causes huge economic losses every year. How to improve the corrosion resistance of steel has always been a research focus. Adding rare earth elements into steel is an important method to improve the corrosion resistance of steel. In this paper, the effects of rare earth elements on steel are summarized, including the purification of molten steel, modification and modification of inclusions, improvement of grain boundaries by solid solution strengthening, the influence of phase transformation and the refinement of microstructure, and reduction in C and N desolubilization. On this basis, the progress of research on the corrosion resistance mechanisms of rare earth steel is summarized, focusing on rare earth-modified inclusions. This includes the changes in composition and sizes of inclusions by rare earth addition, promoting the transformation of MnS and Al2O3 in rare earth inclusions with regular shapes, smaller sizes and better performance, or composite rare earth inclusions. The corrosion pits that form in the early stages of corrosion are shallow in depth, fewer in number and light in corrosion degree. The effects of rare earth materials on the rust layer include: rare earth promotes the formation of a more stable corrosion product α-FeOOH, and rare earth promotes the formation of a dense rust layer, which covers the surface of the matrix and hinders the transmission of corrosion ions. The protective effect of the rare earth atomic layer on the substrate and the corrosion inhibition effect of rare earth ions are formed by the segregation of rare earth at the interface. In the end, the existing problems in the research into rare earth steel and future research directions are briefly put forward, including improving the addition process of rare earth steel, theoretical guidance on enhancing the corrosion resistance mechanism of rare earth steel, and extending the research from La, Ce, and Y steel to more rare earth steels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion and Corrosion Prevention in Extreme Environments)
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