Special Issue "Innovations in Laser Surface Microprocessing, Coatings and Characterization"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Surface Characterization, Deposition and Modification".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Suwas Nikumb
Website
Guest Editor
National Research Council Canada, London, ON, Canada
Interests: Precision laser micromachining of materials, Ultrashort short pulse, diode-pumped and solid-state lasers and their applications to micro devices and products, laser micro-processing of materials, photonic band gap materials, porous semiconductors, machine & process dynamics, micro-device/sensor fabrication and laser joining of materials.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit your technological contributions and manuscripts to this Special Issue, titled “Innovations in Laser Surface Microprocessing, Coatings, and Applications”.

The progress in the development of laser microprocessing of materials, ultrashort short-pulsed lasers, and their applications to microdevices and products, is breathtaking in various manufacturing sectors. Micro/nano-technologies and their applications in surface engineering applications are creating new opportunities. In particular, the continuous progress of adding unique surface functionality by structuring, texturing, or polishing surfaces of diverse materials, accompanied with protective hard coatings for enhancing the life cycle are being investigated for aesthetic, tribological, joining/adhesion, as well as the creation of superhydrophobic, hydrophilic, iceophobic and oleophobic surfaces, and their applications for one-of-a-kind products.

This Special Issue will focus on emerging advances in novel laser microprocessing technologies and coating techniques with characterization relevant to surface modification along with unique fabrication methodologies for evolving manufacturing fields.

Topics include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Laser processing methods for surface fabrication, design architecture
  • Laser microfabrication technologies to enhance adhesion through surface modification
  • Textured/structured and engineered surfaces and their applications
  • Microfabrication technologies, micromilling, micro/nanofeatures machining, laser ablation, modeling studies
  • New integrated techniques and technologies for photonics and other applications
  • Applications of ultrafast lasers for material surface modification
  • Coatings techniques, research on protective coatings to enhance surface life and characterization results

Dr. Suwas Nikumb
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Investigation of the Surface Integrity of Q345 Steel After Nd:YAG Laser Cleaning of Oxidized Mining Parts
Coatings 2020, 10(8), 716; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10080716 - 23 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
As a common mechanical material for mining machinery, Q345 is prone to oxidation due to the moist working environment. At present, laser cleaning is often used to remove rust oxides from the substrate. The pollutant of mining machinery is comprised of a heavy [...] Read more.
As a common mechanical material for mining machinery, Q345 is prone to oxidation due to the moist working environment. At present, laser cleaning is often used to remove rust oxides from the substrate. The pollutant of mining machinery is comprised of a heavy oxide layer and organic ingredients, which are difficult to remove and require high energy per pulse. However, excessive energy is capable of easily destroying surface integrity, such as increasing surface roughness (Ra), generating ablative pits, oxidizing, decreasing microhardness (HV), and decreasing corrosion resistance. Therefore, this paper focused on investigating the surface integrity of mining parts under different laser powers, repetition rates and overlapping rates of the laser spots. The results showed that the surface integrity of the samples gradually improved as the energy per pulse and overlapping rates increased. However, excessive energy caused a negative effect on surface integrity. Based on the comprehensive analysis, optimal parameters were obtained when the power was 280 W, the repetition rate was 10 kHz (pulse duration 84 ns), and the overlapping rate of the laser spot was 70%. This work can provide theoretical guidance for the laser cleaning of mining machinery. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Comparison of the Microstructure Evolution and Wear Resistance of Ti6Al4V Composite Coatings Reinforced by Hard Pure or Ni-plated Cubic Boron Nitride Particles Prepared with Laser Cladding on a Ti6Al4V Substrate
Coatings 2020, 10(7), 702; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10070702 - 20 Jul 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
Titanium alloy is a major structural material with excellent high specific strength in aerospace applications. Cubic boron nitride (cBN) is a synthetic wear-resistant material with high hardness, similar to that of diamond, that is used in mechanical cutting and grinding. In addition, the [...] Read more.
Titanium alloy is a major structural material with excellent high specific strength in aerospace applications. Cubic boron nitride (cBN) is a synthetic wear-resistant material with high hardness, similar to that of diamond, that is used in mechanical cutting and grinding. In addition, the thermal stability of cubic boron nitride particles is much better than that of diamond. In order to further enhance the wear resistance of the Ti6Al4V alloy, the laser cladding (LC) technology characteristics of metallurgical bonding were used to prepare cubic boron nitride/Ti6Al4V and Ni-plated cubic boron nitride/Ti6Al4V composite coatings on Ti6Al4V substrates in this paper. However, in the laser molten pool, it is difficult to retain the raw properties of cubic boron nitride particles under laser radiation. Both composite coatings were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The microstructures and interface bonding between cubic boron nitride particles and the Ti6Al4V matrix were examined using SEM, and the wear resistance and the worn track morphology of the composite coatings were evaluated using the ball-on-disc wear test and step profiler (WTM-2E). The results indicated that the Ni-plated cubic boron nitride/Ti6Al4V composite coating showed fewer thermal defects in comparison with the cubic boron nitride/Ti6Al4V coating. The Ni plating on the surface of cubic boron nitride particles was able to avoid the generation of thermal cracking of the cubic boron nitride particles in the composite coating. The TiN reaction layer was formed between the cubic boron nitride particles and Ti6Al4V matrix, which effectively prevented the further decomposition of the cubic boron nitride particles. The XRD and XPS results confirmed that the TiN reaction layer formed between the cubic boron nitride particles and Ti6Al4V. The Ni plating on the surface of the cubic boron nitride particles was also beneficial for increasing the wear resistance of the composite coating. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Adhesion Effect on the Hyperfine Frequency Shift of an Alkali Metal Vapor Cell with Paraffin Coating Using Peak-Force Tapping AFM
Coatings 2020, 10(1), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10010084 - 19 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
We have investigated the adhesion effect on the hyperfine frequency shift of an alkali metal vapor cell with paraffin coating using the peak-force tapping AFM (atomic force microscopy) technique by developing a uniform and high-quality paraffin coating method. We observed a relatively uniform [...] Read more.
We have investigated the adhesion effect on the hyperfine frequency shift of an alkali metal vapor cell with paraffin coating using the peak-force tapping AFM (atomic force microscopy) technique by developing a uniform and high-quality paraffin coating method. We observed a relatively uniform temperature field on the substrate can be obtained theoretically and experimentally with the closed-type previse temperature-controlled evaporation method. The roughness and adhesion of the coating surface as low as 0.8 nm and 20 pN were successfully obtained, respectively. Furthermore, the adhesion information dependence of the topography was investigated from the force spectroscopy, which indicates that the adhesion force jumped on the edge of the particles and stepped but remained constant above the particles and steps regardless of their height for paraffin coating. Finally, we can evaluate the relaxation and the hyperfine frequency shift of an alkali metal vapor cell through accurately calculating the surface adsorption energy of the paraffin coating from peak-force tapping information. This finding is crucial for improving the sensitivity of the atomic sensors through directly analyzing the adhesion effect of the paraffin coating films instead of measuring the relaxation times. Full article
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