2024 Feature Papers in Clinics and Practice

A special issue of Clinics and Practice (ISSN 2039-7283).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 1421

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will be a collection of "2024 Feature Papers in Clinics and Practice" that contain either cutting-edge research results or comprehensive reviews. The submitted manuscripts will be peer reviewed. The accepted papers will be published in the open access journal Clinics and Practice.

We welcome the submission of manuscripts from Editorial Board Members and from outstanding scholars invited by the Editorial Board Members and the Editorial Office.

You are welcome to submit manuscripts to be published in this Special Issue directly to our Editorial Office at [email protected] for the evaluation. We are looking forward to submissions.

Prof. Dr. Giustino Varrassi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Clinics and Practice is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • anaesthesiology
  • pain medicine
  • pain management
  • pain assessment
  • chronic pain
  • pain perception
  • pharmacodynamics
  • comorbidity
  • pain measurement
  • pharmacokinetics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 910 KiB  
Article
The Correlation between Maternal and Neonatal Vit D (25(OH)D) Levels in Greece: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Artemisia Kokkinari, Maria Dagla, Evangelia Antoniou, Aikaterini Lykeridou, Giannoula Kyrkou, Kostas Bagianos and Georgios Iatrakis
Clin. Pract. 2024, 14(3), 749-764; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract14030060 - 26 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Background: Few studies have correlated maternal and neonatal Vit D (25(OH)D) levels at birth in Greece. We investigated this potential association, taking into account the administration or not of low doses (400–800 IU) of prenatal Vit D supplements. Our study contributes evidence not [...] Read more.
Background: Few studies have correlated maternal and neonatal Vit D (25(OH)D) levels at birth in Greece. We investigated this potential association, taking into account the administration or not of low doses (400–800 IU) of prenatal Vit D supplements. Our study contributes evidence not only to the small amount of existing literature regarding the above correlation, but also to the topic of maternal and neonatal vitamin D deficiency (VDD) during pregnancy in Mediterranean countries, such as Greece. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 248 neonates and their mothers from September 2019 to January 2022. Blood samples of 25(OH)D were studied at the time of delivery. Frequency counts and percentages were registered, and logistic regression was used to investigate the independent factors associated with maternal Vit D status. The Chi-square test and the Pearson coefficient were used to demonstrate a possible association between maternal and neonatal 25(OH)D levels. Results: Our findings show a high prevalence of VDD in Greek women and their newborns at birth. This was observed not only in women who did not receive Vit D supplements, but also in all the study groups, especially in the autumn and winter months. We observed that mothers who received low doses (400–800 IU) of prenatal Vit D supplements increased both their own 25(OH)D concentrations and those of their newborns; however, the latter did not seem to be completely covered by the prenatal administration of Vit D because, although their 25(OH)D concentrations increased, they never reached sufficient 25(OH)D levels, unlike their mothers who reached sufficient concentrations. Conclusions: Overall, this study highlights the strong association between maternal and neonatal 25(OH)D concentrations at the end of gestation. However, neonates tended to show even lower 25(OH)D concentrations relative to maternal 25(OH)D concentrations. The same phenomenon was observed irrespective of the administration of Vit D supplements during pregnancy. Moreover, this is what was observed concerning the administration of formulations with 400–800 IU of Vit D, which the doctors in our clinic used in the present study. In any case, more clinical studies related to the administration of higher doses of Vit D supplementation to pregnant women would lead to more reliable conclusions. Without a doubt, the measurement of maternal vitamin D status during pregnancy provides opportunities for preventive and therapeutic interventions in the mother–infant pair. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2024 Feature Papers in Clinics and Practice)
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13 pages, 8122 KiB  
Article
A Worldwide Bibliometric Analysis of Published Literature Assessing Fear of COVID-19
by Jesús Cebrino and Silvia Portero de la Cruz
Clin. Pract. 2024, 14(3), 672-684; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract14030054 - 23 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Many people experience intense fear of COVID-19. The purpose of this study was to provide a comprehensive visual overview of the published literature from 2020 to 2022 assessing fear of COVID-19. From 2020 to 2022, we employed the Scopus database to conduct a [...] Read more.
Many people experience intense fear of COVID-19. The purpose of this study was to provide a comprehensive visual overview of the published literature from 2020 to 2022 assessing fear of COVID-19. From 2020 to 2022, we employed the Scopus database to conduct a bibliometric analysis. We used the VOSviewer program to perform the author co-citation analysis, Mapchart to produce a worldwide map, and Wordart to make a word cloud image. From the 1769 records examined, 1654 (93.50%) were articles, with English being the most common language (96.31%). From 2020 to 2022, annual citations experienced significant growth (R2 = 99.91%; p = 0.0195). The Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM, France) and China led in terms of publication output (n = 36; n = 255). M. D. Griffiths authored the highest number of articles (n = 21). The most active journal was the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (n = 146), and the most prevalent keyword was “human/s” (11.51%). This bibliometric analysis evaluates the quality of the research on fear of the pandemic and the crisis management of COVID-19, which can provide managers and researchers with crucial insights for future decision making. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2024 Feature Papers in Clinics and Practice)
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Review

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8 pages, 547 KiB  
Review
Concomitant Panniculectomy in Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: A Narrative Review Focusing on Obese Patients
by Salvatore Giordano, Andre’ Salval and Carlo Maria Oranges
Clin. Pract. 2024, 14(2), 653-660; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract14020052 - 22 Apr 2024
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Abstract
The global prevalence of obesity continues to rise, contributing to an increased frequency of abdominal wall reconstruction procedures, particularly ventral hernia repairs, in individuals with elevated body mass indexes. Undertaking these operations in obese patients poses inherent challenges. This review focuses on the [...] Read more.
The global prevalence of obesity continues to rise, contributing to an increased frequency of abdominal wall reconstruction procedures, particularly ventral hernia repairs, in individuals with elevated body mass indexes. Undertaking these operations in obese patients poses inherent challenges. This review focuses on the current literature in this area, with special attention to the impact of concomitant panniculectomy. Obese individuals undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction face elevated rates of wound healing complications and hernia recurrence. The inclusion of concurrent panniculectomy heightens the risk of surgical site occurrences but does not significantly influence hernia recurrence rates. While this combined approach can be executed in obese patients, caution is warranted, due to the higher risk of complications. Physicians should carefully balance and communicate the potential risks, especially regarding the increased likelihood of wound healing complications. Acknowledging these factors is crucial in shared decision making and ensuring optimal patient outcomes in the context of abdominal wall reconstruction and related procedures in the obese population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 2024 Feature Papers in Clinics and Practice)
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