Shoulder Disorders: Diagnosis and Treatment

A special issue of Clinics and Practice (ISSN 2039-7283).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 443

Special Issue Editor


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Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna, Italy
Interests: fracture; imaging; computed tomography; osteoporosis; musculoskeletal imaging; spine; bone; ultrasound; magnetic resonance imaging; multiple myeloma
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague,

Shoulder pain is a very frequent complaint. Numerous pathological conditions, such as calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff, adhesive capsulitis, subacromial–subdeltoid bursitis, acromioclavicular or glenohumeral arthritis, tenosynovitis of the long bicep tendon, rotator cuff tendon tears, and numerous other less common conditions, may be the cause of painful shoulders.

The goal of this Special Issue is to include a collection of up-to-date papers focused on the diagnosis and treatment of all these conditions. Particularly, novel imaging methods for diagnosis and minimally invasive image-guided treatments used in attempt to alleviate painful shoulders will be included.

Dr. Paolo Spinnato
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • shoulder
  • pain
  • calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff
  • adhesive capsulitis
  • subacromial–subdeltoid bursitis
  • acromioclavicular
  • glenohumeral arthritis
  • tenosynovitis of the long bicep tendon
  • rotator cuff tendon tears

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 1997 KiB  
Article
Can Secondary Adhesive Capsulitis Complicate Calcific Tendinitis of the Rotator Cuff? An Ultrasound Imaging Analysis
by Giovanni Tuè, Oriana Masuzzo, Francesco Tucci, Marco Cavallo, Anna Parmeggiani, Fabio Vita, Alberto Patti, Danilo Donati, Alessandro Marinelli, Marco Miceli and Paolo Spinnato
Clin. Pract. 2024, 14(2), 579-589; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract14020045 - 28 Mar 2024
Viewed by 271
Abstract
Background: Adhesive capsulitis (AC) of the glenohumeral joint is a recognized cause of pain associated with both active and passive restricted ranges of movement. AC can be subdivided into primary and secondary forms. Trauma, surgery, immobilization, and diabetes mellitus are the leading well-recognized [...] Read more.
Background: Adhesive capsulitis (AC) of the glenohumeral joint is a recognized cause of pain associated with both active and passive restricted ranges of movement. AC can be subdivided into primary and secondary forms. Trauma, surgery, immobilization, and diabetes mellitus are the leading well-recognized causes of secondary AC. Calcific tendinitis/tendinitis (CT) of the rotator cuff is considered a possible trigger for AC, as reported in a few previous articles. However, there are no original investigations that assess the frequency and characteristics of this association. The aim of our research was to evaluate the presence of AC in a cohort of patients with a known CT condition of the rotator cuff by an ultrasound (US) examination. Materials and methods: We prospectively enrolled all the patients admitted at our single institution (October 2022–June 2023) for the preoperative US evaluation of a known CT condition. In these patients, we searched for parameters related to secondary AC. An axillary pouch (AP) thickness equal to or greater than 4 mm (or greater than 60% of the contralateral AP) was considered diagnostic of AC. Moreover, rotator interval (RI) thickness and the presence of effusion within the long-head biceps tendon (LHBT) sheath was also assessed in all patients. Results: A total of 78 patients (54F, 24M—mean age = 50.0 and range = 31–71 y.o.) were enrolled in the study. In 26 of those patients (26/78—33.3%), US signs of AC were detected. Notably, the mean AP thickness in patients with AC and CT was 3.96 ± 1.37 mm (Group 1) and 2.08 ± 0.40 mm in patients with CT only (Group 2). RI thickness was significantly greater in patients with superimposed AC: 2.54 ± 0.38 mm in Group 1 and 1.81 ± 0.41 mm in Group 2 (p < 0.00001). Moreover, effusion within the LHBT was significantly more frequently detected in patients with AC: 84.61% in Group 1 versus 15.79% in Group 2—p < 0.00001. Conclusion: US signs of AC are found in one-third of patients with CT of the rotator cuff, demonstrating that AC represents a frequent complication that should be routinely evaluated during US investigation to provide more personalized treatment strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Shoulder Disorders: Diagnosis and Treatment)
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