Special Issue "Increasing Knowledge on Learning and Behavioral Difficulties in Children"

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Pietro Muratori
Website
Guest Editor
IRCCS Fondazione Stella Maris, Pisa, Italy
Interests: oppositional defiant disorder; conduct disorder; cognitive behavioral therapy for children and parents; neurodevelopmental disorders; prevention intervention; coping power program; mindfulness
Dr. Chiara Pecini
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Education, Languages, Intercultures, Literatures and Psychology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
Interests: language disorder; specific learning disorder; cognitive rehabilitation; home-based interventions; assessment; empowerment and rehabilitation of executive functions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Learning and behavioral difficulties often emerge during childhood, and are one of the most important issues of concern for families and schools. Learning difficulties can cause negative effects during the lifespan, such as a higher risk of school drop-out, poorer mental health, and vocational difficulties. Behavioral difficulties often emerge in the same period, and are one of the other most important reasons of concern for teachers, educators, and school administrators. Such difficulties show high stability in time and are associated with long-term negative outcomes such as school failure and psychopathology. The co-occurrence between such behavioral difficulties and learning difficulties, defined either as diagnostic categories or dimensional quantitative traits, is well documented. Nevertheless, the relationship between behavioral and learning difficulties is complex and needs to be further described. There has been debate about whether the causal direction of the behavioral–learning association can be interpreted in different ways, for example, in a bidirectional way or by considering whether the common underlying risk vulnerability factors working at different levels (e.g., genetic vulnerability, attachment difficulties, and neural development). We welcome articles from across the globe on all matters relating to the developmental course, evaluation, and treatment of learning and behavioral difficulties. The target population of the article can involve all of the developmental periods. Case reports, reviews, and original research will be considered for publication. We are looking forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Pietro Muratori
Dr. Chiara Pecini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • learning problems
  • behavioral problems
  • prevention intervention
  • school
  • assessment
  • executive functions
  • hyperactivity

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Associations between Learning and Behavioral Difficulties in Second-Grade Children
Children 2020, 7(9), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/children7090112 - 26 Aug 2020
Abstract
Learning and behavioral difficulties often emerge during the first years of primary school and are one of the most important issues of concern for families and schools. The study was aimed at investigating the co-occurrence of difficulties between academic learning and emotional-behavioral control [...] Read more.
Learning and behavioral difficulties often emerge during the first years of primary school and are one of the most important issues of concern for families and schools. The study was aimed at investigating the co-occurrence of difficulties between academic learning and emotional-behavioral control in typically developing school children and the moderating role of sex. A sample of 640 second-grade school children participated in the study. This study used the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire to measure the emotional and behavioral difficulties and a battery of objective and standardized tests to evaluate the learning skills in children. In this sample 7% to 16% of children performed below the normal range in reading and/or arithmetic tests. Mixed models showed that children’s hyperactive behaviors were positively related to both reading and math difficulties, and emotional problems correlated negatively with reading accuracy. The more children displayed behavioral difficulties, the more they were exposed to the risk of worsening reading and math performance, especially for girls. The result that among different emotional-behavioral problems within the school setting, hyperactivity behaviors and emotional difficulties are related to learning difficulties with a moderate effect of sex, needs to be taken into account in screening and prevention programs for learning difficulties in order to not disregard the complexity of the associated profiles. Full article
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