Special Issue "Child Psychomotricity: Development, Assessment, and Intervention"

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Child and Adolescent Psychiatry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 December 2022 | Viewed by 4221

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Ana Rita Matias
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sport and Health Sciences, School of Health and Human Development & Comprehensive Health Research Centre (CHRC), University of Évora, Évora, Portugal
Interests: typical development; atypical development; intervention
Prof. Dr. Gabriela Almeida
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sport and Health, CHRC–UE - Comprehensive Health Research Centre, University of Évora, Evora, Portugal
Interests: child motor development; perception of motor and social competence; psychomotor intervention; assessment and intervention of motor, cognitive, social and emotional development; in typical and atypical development
Prof. Dr. Guida Veiga
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sport and Health, CHRC–UE - Comprehensive Health Research Centre, University of Évora, Evora, Portugal
Interests: motor competence; social–emotional competence; social interactions; psychomotor intervention; relaxation; play; assessment and observation
Prof. Dr. José Francisco Filipe Marmeleira
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sport and Health, CHRC–UE - Comprehensive Health Research Centre, University of Évora, Evora, Portugal
Interests: motor and social–-emotional development; embodiment; adapted physical activity
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Psychomotricity is based on the interactions between psychic functions, motor (and biological) functions, and motor behavior (gestures, posture, attitude, physical activity, motor skills). The theoretical foundations of psychomotricity are based on neuroscience, psychogenetics, cognitive psychology, and psychoanalysis.  As a practice, psychomotricity offers comprehensive care to the individual across their lifespan, including both typical and atypical development. Psychomotricity focuses on three domains of intervention: rehabilitation (to restore adequate functioning), therapy (to deal with disorders with several etiologies), and education (to ensure harmonious development). In these domains, various bodily mediations are used, such as relaxation, therapeutic touch, play, rhythmic activities, body expression and awareness activities, water therapy, equestrian therapy and adapted motor ativities.

Across Europe, the psychomotor profession has gained recognition from other professions and from the rehabilitation, therapeutic and educational communities. Despite its recognition by the community and other professionals, more scientific evidence is needed on the benefits of psychomotricity.

This Special Issue, “Child Psychomotricity: Development, assessment and intervention”, aims to present  the research wihin the scope of child psychomotricity, in either the rehabilitational, therapeutuc, or educational fields. For publication, original papers reporting fundamental research, systematic reviews and study protocols that describe complex samples or experimental methods will be considered.

We are looking forward to receiving your contributions.

Kind regards,

Prof. Dr. Ana Rita Matias
Prof. Dr. Gabriela Almeida
Prof. Dr. Guida Veiga
Prof. Dr. José Francisco Marmeleira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • psychomotor therapy
  • psychomotor intervention
  • infancy
  • childhood
  • middle childhood
  • preschool childhood
  • primary school childhood
  • neurodevelopmental disorders
  • psychomotor development and psychopathology

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Article
Handwriting and Motor-Related Daily Performance among Adolescents with Dysgraphia and Their Impact on Physical Health-Related Quality of Life
Children 2022, 9(10), 1437; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9101437 - 21 Sep 2022
Viewed by 236
Abstract
Knowledge is limited about dysgraphia in adolescence and its association with daily motor-related daily performance and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This study aimed to (1) compare and (2) examine correlations between handwriting measures, motor-related daily performance, and HRQOL of adolescents with and [...] Read more.
Knowledge is limited about dysgraphia in adolescence and its association with daily motor-related daily performance and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This study aimed to (1) compare and (2) examine correlations between handwriting measures, motor-related daily performance, and HRQOL of adolescents with and without dysgraphia and (3) examine the contribution of motor-related daily performance and handwriting measures to predict their physical HRQOL. There were eighty adolescents (13–18 yr): half with dysgraphia and half matched controls without dysgraphia per the Handwriting Proficiency Screening Questionnaire and Handwriting Legibility Scale participated. They copied a paragraph script onto a paper attached to the Computerized Penmanship Evaluation Tool digitizer and completed the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-brief version and the Adult Developmental Coordination Disorder Checklist (ADC). We found significant between-group differences in motor-related daily performance, handwriting measures, and HRQOL and significant correlations between HRQOL and handwriting process measures and motor-coordination ability. Handwriting measures predicted 25%, and the ADC A and C subscales 45.6%, of the research group’s physical QOL domain score variability. Notably, the control group’s current perceptions of their motor-coordination performance (ADC-C) predicted 36.5% of the variance in physical QOL. Dysgraphia’s negative effects during childhood and adolescence may reduce adolescents’ HRQOL now and into adulthood. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Psychomotricity: Development, Assessment, and Intervention)
Article
Psychomotor Skills Activities in the Classroom from an Early Childhood Education Teachers’ Perspective
Children 2022, 9(8), 1214; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9081214 - 12 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 434
Abstract
Psychomotricity is a tool that allows the development of different capacities, skills and corporal abilities of people. Currently, it is included in early childhood education programmes due to its importance in children’s development, but, even so, it is not always given the role [...] Read more.
Psychomotricity is a tool that allows the development of different capacities, skills and corporal abilities of people. Currently, it is included in early childhood education programmes due to its importance in children’s development, but, even so, it is not always given the role they deserve. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the perceptions of early childhood education teachers towards the needs and current state of psychomotor skills in the educational context of Extremadura schools and compare the information provided by teachers that work in rural and urban areas. A questionnaire was administered using a tablet and a Google Forms application. The sample consisted of 216 teachers, selected using a non-probability sampling method based on coexistence sampling. The Mann–Whitney U test was applied to determine the relationships between the different items and dimensions according to the location of the school, and Spearman’s Rho test was used to find out if there is any relationship between the age of the teachers and their responses in the different dimensions. The results showed that psychomotor skills do not receive the place they deserve, with insufficient material and facilities, inadequate training, few sessions and inappropriate programming, together with the rest of the components of the cycle. Therefore, it can be concluded that it is necessary to include psychomotor skills in the training of teachers and that the centres should be concerned about providing teachers with the necessary material and spaces for their work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Psychomotricity: Development, Assessment, and Intervention)
Article
The Assessment of the Psychomotor Profile in Children: Preliminary Psychometric Analysis of the Portuguese Version of the Batterie d’Evaluation des Fonctions Neuropsychomotrices de L’enfant (NPmot.pt)
Children 2022, 9(8), 1195; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9081195 - 09 Aug 2022
Viewed by 404
Abstract
Psychomotor assessment is an expanding research field. A deep knowledge of the typical development will allow for better child-centered planning. Due to the scarcity of psychomotor assessment instruments validated in Portugal, our research aims to perform a preliminary analysis of the psychometric properties [...] Read more.
Psychomotor assessment is an expanding research field. A deep knowledge of the typical development will allow for better child-centered planning. Due to the scarcity of psychomotor assessment instruments validated in Portugal, our research aims to perform a preliminary analysis of the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Battery for Neuropsychomotor functions evaluation (NPmot.pt). The NPmot.pt was translated and adapted to the Portuguese language/culture and applied to 200 children, 4–12 years old (6 y 10 m ± 0 y 4 m), with (n = 150) and without developmental disorders, attending regular school. For content validity, nine experts classified all items according to their relevance, clarity, simplicity and ambiguity. All indexes (IVC > 0.78) pointed out the representativeness of indicators, corroborated by experts proportion agreement (>0.42), and Cohen’s kappa scores (0.02 > k < 0.95). Reliability was confirmed through internal consistency, with Cronbach alphas/split-half (α > 0.45) and temporal reliability (test-retest technique, 0.45 > r < 0.99). Construct validity was analyzed through domains and domains-total correlations, tending to moderate to strong (0.31 > r < 0.92); exploratory factor analysis pointed out an eight-factor solution, explaining 88.5% of the total variance. For discriminant validity, we conducted a comparative study between children with and without developmental disorders that revealed significant differences (p < 0.05). The NPmot.pt seems to confirm validity and reliability for Portugal; however, more studies are needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Psychomotricity: Development, Assessment, and Intervention)
Article
A Novel Data-driven Approach to Examine Children’s Movements and Social Behaviour in Schoolyard Environments
Children 2022, 9(8), 1177; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9081177 - 05 Aug 2022
Viewed by 540
Abstract
Social participation at schoolyards is crucial for children’s development. Yet, schoolyard environments contain features that can hinder children’s social participation. In this paper, we empirically examine schoolyards to identify existing obstacles. Traditionally, this type of study requires huge amounts of detailed information about [...] Read more.
Social participation at schoolyards is crucial for children’s development. Yet, schoolyard environments contain features that can hinder children’s social participation. In this paper, we empirically examine schoolyards to identify existing obstacles. Traditionally, this type of study requires huge amounts of detailed information about children in a given environment. Collecting such data is exceedingly difficult and expensive. In this study, we present a novel sensor data-driven approach for gathering this information and examining the effect of schoolyard environments on children's behaviours in light of schoolyard affordances and individual effectivities. Sensor data is collected from 150 children at two primary schools, using location trackers, proximity tags, and Multi-Motion receivers to measure locations, face-to-face contacts, and activities. Results show strong potential for this data-driven approach, as it allows collecting data from individuals and their interactions with schoolyard environments, examining the triad of physical, social, and cultural affordances in schoolyards, and identifying factors that significantly impact children's behaviours. Based on this approach, we further obtain better knowledge on the impact of these factors and identify limitations in schoolyard designs, which can inform schools, designers, and policymakers about current problems and practical solutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Psychomotricity: Development, Assessment, and Intervention)
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Article
Being Deaf in Mainstream Schools: The Effect of a Hearing Loss in Children’s Playground Behaviors
Children 2022, 9(7), 1091; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9071091 - 21 Jul 2022
Viewed by 377
Abstract
Naturalistic playground observations are a rich source of information when studying the social interactions of preschool children. On the playground, children can interact with their peers, explore different places and activities, and engage in different types of play. For deaf and hard of [...] Read more.
Naturalistic playground observations are a rich source of information when studying the social interactions of preschool children. On the playground, children can interact with their peers, explore different places and activities, and engage in different types of play. For deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children, interactions at a playground can be more difficult because of the large number of auditory stimuli surrounding them. Constraints in the access to the social world on the playground might hamper DHH children’s interactions with their typically hearing (TH) peers, activities, and play. This pilot study aimed to examine the playground behaviors of preschool DHH children across three aspects: social levels, type of activities, and play choices. For this purpose, 12 preschool DHH children were observed during recess time, and their behaviors were coded and compared to their 85 TH peers. The preliminary findings indicate that DHH children spend less time in social interactions compared to their TH peers and that they still face difficulties when socially engaging with their TH peers. These findings suggest that interventions should focus on three aspects: the physical environment awareness of TH peers about communicating with DHH children, and the use of exercise play to facilitate social interactions between DHH children and their TH peers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Psychomotricity: Development, Assessment, and Intervention)
Article
The Psychometric Properties of the Gilliam Autism Rating Scale (GARS-3) with Kurdish Samples of Children with Developmental Disabilities
Children 2022, 9(3), 434; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9030434 - 19 Mar 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 848
Abstract
There is marked variation internationally in the prevalence of children identified as having autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In part, this may reflect a shortage of screening tools for the early identification of children with ASD in many countries. This study aimed to evaluate [...] Read more.
There is marked variation internationally in the prevalence of children identified as having autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In part, this may reflect a shortage of screening tools for the early identification of children with ASD in many countries. This study aimed to evaluate the Kurdish translation of the Gilliam autism rating scale—third edition (GARS-3), a scale commonly used in Western countries that evaluates six domains related to the ASD definition from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) 5, notably Restricted/Repetitive Behavior, deficits in Social interaction and Social Communication, as well as differences in Cognitive Style, Maladaptive Speech, and Emotional Response. GARS-3 assessments were completed through interviews with parents of 735 children, 442 (53%) of whom were diagnosed with ASD. 165 (22%) with an intellectual disability, 49 (7%) with communication disorders, and 133 (18%) typically developing children. The reliability, construct, and the predictive validity of the scale was assessed, and the scores suggestive of a child having ASD were identified. The factor structure was broadly replicated, especially on items relating to social interaction and social communication. The cutoffs for the total scores that were indicative of possible ASD had a high degree of specificity and sensitivity in distinguishing children with ASD from typically developing peers. Some children with I.D. and communication disorders may also score above the threshold, and further assessments should be sought to confirm the presence of autistic traits. Although GARS-3 could be recommended for use in Kurdistan and possibly similar cultures, further prospective research is needed to confirm a diagnosis of assessment with children who score above and below the cutoff scores identified in this study. Moreover, the development of normative data drawn from Kurdish samples of children would be advantageous, although ambitious, given the lack of diagnostic services in many low- and middle-income countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Psychomotricity: Development, Assessment, and Intervention)
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