Sleep Health in Infants, Children and Adolescents

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2024) | Viewed by 4338

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Personal and Preventive Care, Family Care Team, Philips Research, 5656 AE Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Interests: developmental psychology; neuropsychology; infant mental health; child development; perinatal psychology; pregnancy; infant sleep; prenatal maternal anxiety; bonding and attachment
Biomedical Diagnostics Lab, Department of Electrical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5612 AZ Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Interests: signal processing and machine learning; unobtrusive sensing; vital signs monitoring; sleep; neonatology & pregnancy; epilepsy & brain activity; clinical decision support
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sleep is important to all of us. Without proper sleep, we quickly become grumpy, have trouble concentrating, and have increased reaction times. If sleep problems worsen, so do the symptoms of sleep deprivation: impulsive behavior, impaired judgement, or even hallucinations, to name just a few. What is healthy sleep, though? How does it develop over the course of our lives?

The focus of this Special Issue is on healthy sleep and its prerequisites in infants, children, and adolescents. It will provide not only the latest insights into the physiology of sleep at different ages, but also into relevant psychological and sociocultural concepts, such as temperament, attachment, parenting style, and individualistic versus collectivistic society. A link will be made between sleep practices in our early lives, and the development of sleep as we go into adolescence. The knowledge gathered here can support healthy sleep development in children of all ages, improving both short- and long-term outcomes for both them and their families.

Dr. Renée Otte
Dr. Xi Long
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sleep development
  • infancy
  • childhood
  • adolescence
  • sleep physiology
  • sleep psychology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 1726 KiB  
Article
Comparative Analysis of Sleep Hygiene and Patterns among Adolescents in Two Russian Arctic Regions: A Pilot Study
by Sergey N. Kolomeichuk, Lyudmila S. Korostovtseva, Artem V. Morozov, Michail V. Bochkarev, Yury V. Sviryaev, Dina A. Petrashova, Victoria V. Pozharskaya, Alexander A. Markov, Michail G. Poluektov and Denis G. Gubin
Children 2024, 11(3), 279; https://doi.org/10.3390/children11030279 - 24 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Purpose: The circumpolar habitat stands as one of the most vulnerable environments for human activity and health. The primary study objective was to compare sleep-related factors, light exposure, social cues, and potential confounding variables among schoolchildren residing in the European Arctic region from [...] Read more.
Purpose: The circumpolar habitat stands as one of the most vulnerable environments for human activity and health. The primary study objective was to compare sleep-related factors, light exposure, social cues, and potential confounding variables among schoolchildren residing in the European Arctic region from two settlements situated below and above the Polar Circle using validated self-reported questionnaires. Materials and Methods: We recruited 94 children aged 13–15 years (40.4% males), matched by sex and age, from public educational institutions in two circumpolar settlements located below (Kem’, Republic of Karelia; 64.6 NL) and above the Polar Circle (Apatity, Murmansk Region; 67.3 NL). Participants completed several surveys, including the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale, the Insomnia Severity Index, the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale, and the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire, to evaluate sleep parameters and chronotype. The χ2 test was used to test for differences between proportions. Linear regression and multiple regression models with co-factors were applied to assess the relationship between studied indicators. Results: A noteworthy increase in physical activity was observed in children residing in Kem’ compared to those in Apatity. Children from Apatity showed higher alcohol consumption than their counterparts from Kem’. The overall rate of excessive daytime sleepiness in the sample was 17.1%. Moderate insomnia symptoms were reported in 18.4% of adolescents living in Kem’ and in 25% of respondents living in Apatity, respectively. Notably, participants from Kem’ attained higher academic scores and had longer exposure to sunlight on schooldays. On the other hand, children from Apatity tended to have later bedtimes and sleep-onset times on schooldays. According to the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire data, a reliance on alarm clocks on schooldays, and a higher Sleep Stability Factor based on the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale. Discussion: Our study indicating that higher physical activity and longer sunlight exposure among Kem’ children on schooldays are associated with earlier wake-up times during schooldays, earlier bedtime whole week, reduced dependence on alarm clocks, and higher academic achievements. The results of older schoolchildren differ from many works published previously in the USA, Argentina, and Japan, which could be explained by the season when the study was performed. Here, we observed a negative impact on school performance and sleep parameters in children living in high latitudes, namely in circumpolar regions. Conclusions: Our study points out that adolescents living above the Polar Circle tend to have sleep problems, e.g., late sleep-onset times, higher excessive daytime sleepiness, and insomnia-related symptoms, because of experiencing reduced exposure to natural light. Future research encompassing assessments across all four seasons will provide a more comprehensive understanding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health in Infants, Children and Adolescents)
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12 pages, 1577 KiB  
Article
Combining Cardiorespiratory Signals and Video-Based Actigraphy for Classifying Preterm Infant Sleep States
by Dandan Zhang, Zheng Peng, Carola Van Pul, Sebastiaan Overeem, Wei Chen, Jeroen Dudink, Peter Andriessen, Ronald M. Aarts and Xi Long
Children 2023, 10(11), 1792; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10111792 - 7 Nov 2023
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Abstract
The classification of sleep state in preterm infants, particularly in distinguishing between active sleep (AS) and quiet sleep (QS), has been investigated using cardiorespiratory information such as electrocardiography (ECG) and respiratory signals. However, accurately differentiating between AS and wake remains challenging; therefore, there [...] Read more.
The classification of sleep state in preterm infants, particularly in distinguishing between active sleep (AS) and quiet sleep (QS), has been investigated using cardiorespiratory information such as electrocardiography (ECG) and respiratory signals. However, accurately differentiating between AS and wake remains challenging; therefore, there is a pressing need to include additional information to further enhance the classification performance. To address the challenge, this study explores the effectiveness of incorporating video-based actigraphy analysis alongside cardiorespiratory signals for classifying the sleep states of preterm infants. The study enrolled eight preterm infants, and a total of 91 features were extracted from ECG, respiratory signals, and video-based actigraphy. By employing an extremely randomized trees (ET) algorithm and leave-one-subject-out cross-validation, a kappa score of 0.33 was achieved for the classification of AS, QS, and wake using cardiorespiratory features only. The kappa score significantly improved to 0.39 when incorporating eight video-based actigraphy features. Furthermore, the classification performance of AS and wake also improved, showing a kappa score increase of 0.21. These suggest that combining video-based actigraphy with cardiorespiratory signals can potentially enhance the performance of sleep-state classification in preterm infants. In addition, we highlighted the distinct strengths and limitations of video-based actigraphy and cardiorespiratory data in classifying specific sleep states. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health in Infants, Children and Adolescents)
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11 pages, 775 KiB  
Review
Sleep Disordered Breathing in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An In-Depth Review of Correlations and Complexities
by Marco Zaffanello, Giorgio Piacentini, Luana Nosetti and Leonardo Zoccante
Children 2023, 10(10), 1609; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10101609 - 27 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1299
Abstract
Sleep-disordered breathing is a significant problem affecting the pediatric population. These conditions can affect sleep quality and children’s overall health and well-being. Difficulties in social interaction, communication, and repetitive behavioral patterns characterize autism spectrum disorder. Sleep disturbances are common in children with ASD. [...] Read more.
Sleep-disordered breathing is a significant problem affecting the pediatric population. These conditions can affect sleep quality and children’s overall health and well-being. Difficulties in social interaction, communication, and repetitive behavioral patterns characterize autism spectrum disorder. Sleep disturbances are common in children with ASD. This literature review aims to gather and analyze available studies on the relationship between SDB and children with autism spectrum disorder. We comprehensively searched the literature using major search engines (PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science). After removing duplicates, we extracted a total of 96 records. We selected 19 studies for inclusion after a thorough title and abstract screening process. Seven articles were ultimately incorporated into this analysis. The research findings presented herein emphasize the substantial influence of sleep-disordered breathing on pediatric individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). These findings reveal a high incidence of SDB in children with ASD, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis and specialized treatment. Obesity in this population further complicates matters, requiring focused weight management strategies. Surgical interventions, such as adenotonsillectomy, have shown promise in improving behavioral issues in children with ASD affected by OSA, regardless of their obesity status. However, more comprehensive studies are necessary to investigate the benefits of A&T treatment, specifically in children with ASD and OSA. The complex relationship between ASD, SDB, and other factors, such as joint hypermobility and muscle hypotonia, suggests a need for multidisciplinary treatment approaches. Physiotherapy can play a critical role in addressing these intricate health issues. Early sleep assessments and tailored weight management strategies are essential for timely diagnosis and intervention in children with ASD. Policy initiatives should support these efforts to enhance the overall well-being of this population. Further research is crucial to understand the complex causes of sleep disturbances in children with ASD and to develop effective interventions considering the multifaceted nature of these conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health in Infants, Children and Adolescents)
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