Special Issue "Ni-Containing Catalysts"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Catalytic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Patrick Da Costa

SORBONNE UNIVERSITE, Institut Jean Le Rond d'Alembert Combustion, Energies Propres & Turbulence (CEPT) CNRS UMR 7190 2, place de la gare de ceinture, 78210 Saint Cyr L'Ecole, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Catalysis; Chemical Engineering; CO2 utilization; Energy, BioFuels; Pollution control
Guest Editor
Dr. Maria Elena Galvez

CNRS, Institut Jean Le Rond d’Alembert, Sorbonne Université, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: catalysis; chemical engineering; process intensification; thermochemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Murray Raney used Nickel for the first time as a hydrogentation catalyst over one century ago. Since then, the field of Nickel catalysis has seen tremendous advances. During the 1970s, Nickel found extensive use as a catalyst not only for cross-coupling reactions of alkenes/alkynes, such as nucleophilic allylation, oligomerization, and cycloisomerization, etc., but also for C/H activation, oxidative cyclidation, and reduction reactions. More recently, it has been used in the formulation of catalysts assessing important environmental issues, such as CO2 chemical utilization, or as dopant of molybdenum, sulfide-containing catalysts for desulfuration processes. 

Several key properties of nickel such as its thermal stability and redox behavior mean Nickel-containing catalysts are still challenging for a very large range of innovative reaction developments and industrialization. 

The purpose of this Special Issue is to update the most recent advances concerning Nickel catalysts, supported or not, for innovative reaction development.

Prof. Patrick Da Costa
Dr. Maria Elena Galvez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-6
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle The Role of NiO in Reactive Adsorption Desulfurization Over NiO/ZnO-Al2O3-SiO2 Adsorbent
Catalysts 2019, 9(1), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9010079
Received: 17 November 2018 / Revised: 17 December 2018 / Accepted: 8 January 2019 / Published: 14 January 2019
PDF Full-text (3154 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The reactive adsorption desulfurization (RADS) of a model gasoline n-hexane containing thiophene was carried out with a NiO/ZnO-Al2O3-SiO2 adsorbent in N2 and H2, respectively. A declining RADS trend has been observed in N2 [...] Read more.
The reactive adsorption desulfurization (RADS) of a model gasoline n-hexane containing thiophene was carried out with a NiO/ZnO-Al2O3-SiO2 adsorbent in N2 and H2, respectively. A declining RADS trend has been observed in N2, without the presence of H2, indicating that NiO is sulfurized and exhibits activity for RADS. TPR and XPS results presented NiO in the adsorbent is hard to be reduced because of the powerful interaction between NiO and the support. The sulfurization of NiO into NiSx is a primary condition for the RADS process, the same as the presulfurization of hydrotreating catalyst, while metallic Ni is an intermediate reduction product of NiSx. Results of a low RADS temperature at 300 °C, much lower than the reduction temperature of NiO, suggest that NiO plays an important role. Based on assumption of NiO as the main active component, the RADS could reduce the reaction temperature and energy consumption significantly. The participation of hydrogen and n-hexane in pretreatment conducted at 420 °C contributes to the activation of adsorbent. Also, these methods of pretreatment improved the desulfurization performance under the reaction temperature of 300 °C. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ni-Containing Catalysts)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Prominent Conductor Mechanism-Induced Electron Transfer of Biochar Produced by Pyrolysis of Nickel-Enriched Biomass
Catalysts 2018, 8(12), 573; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8120573
Received: 7 October 2018 / Revised: 9 November 2018 / Accepted: 15 November 2018 / Published: 22 November 2018
PDF Full-text (816 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Biochar is redox-active and can function as a sustainable electron shuttle in catalyzing relevant redox reactions. It plays a crucial role in environmental remediation. In this work, we used different-nickel (Ni)-level biochars produced by the pyrolysis of plant biomass with correspondingly different Ni [...] Read more.
Biochar is redox-active and can function as a sustainable electron shuttle in catalyzing relevant redox reactions. It plays a crucial role in environmental remediation. In this work, we used different-nickel (Ni)-level biochars produced by the pyrolysis of plant biomass with correspondingly different Ni levels as extracellular electron shuttles for microbial reduction of ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A high Ni level of the precursor considerably enhanced the conductor mechanism of the produced biochar and thus enabled the biochar to catalyze increased microbial reductions of the Fe(III) mineral, but it did not promote the charging and discharging capacities of the produced biochar. This study can aid in the search for natural biomass with high Ni content to establish low-cost biochars with wide-ranging applications in catalyzing the redox-mediated reactions of pollutants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ni-Containing Catalysts)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Application of POCOP Pincer Nickel Complexes to the Catalytic Hydroboration of Carbon Dioxide
Catalysts 2018, 8(11), 508; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8110508
Received: 1 October 2018 / Revised: 25 October 2018 / Accepted: 29 October 2018 / Published: 1 November 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (8911 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The reduction of CO2 is of great importance. In this paper, different types of bis(phosphinite) (POCOP) pincer nickel complexes, [2,6-(R2PO)2C6H3]NiX (R = tBu, iPr, Ph; X = SH, N3, NCS), [...] Read more.
The reduction of CO2 is of great importance. In this paper, different types of bis(phosphinite) (POCOP) pincer nickel complexes, [2,6-(R2PO)2C6H3]NiX (R = tBu, iPr, Ph; X = SH, N3, NCS), were applied to the catalytic hydroboration of CO2 with catecholborane (HBcat). It was found that pincer complexes with tBu2P or iPr2P phosphine arms are active catalysts for this reaction in which CO2 was successfully reduced to a methanol derivative (CH3OBcat) with a maximum turnover frequency of 1908 h−1 at room temperature under an atmospheric pressure of CO2. However, complexes with phenyl-substituted phosphine arms failed to catalyze this reaction—the catalysts decomposed under the catalytic conditions. Complexes with iPr2P phosphine arms are more active catalysts compared with the corresponding complexes with tBu2P phosphine arms. For complexes with the same phosphine arms, the catalytic activity follows the series of mercapto complex (X = SH) ≈ azido complex (X = N3) >> isothiocyanato complex (X = NCS). It is believed that all of these catalytic active complexes are catalyst precursors which generate the nickel hydride complex [2,6-(R2PO)2C6H3]NiH in situ, and the nickel hydride complex is the active species to catalyze this reaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ni-Containing Catalysts)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Study of Chemical and Morphological Transformations during Ni2Mo3N Synthesis via an Oxide Precursor Nitration Route
Catalysts 2018, 8(10), 436; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8100436
Received: 17 August 2018 / Revised: 24 September 2018 / Accepted: 30 September 2018 / Published: 3 October 2018
PDF Full-text (4343 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Chemical and morphological transformations during Ni2Mo3N synthesis were studied in this work. Nitride samples were synthesized from oxide precursors in H2/N2 flow and were analyzed by thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive [...] Read more.
Chemical and morphological transformations during Ni2Mo3N synthesis were studied in this work. Nitride samples were synthesized from oxide precursors in H2/N2 flow and were analyzed by thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods. In addition, physical and chemical adsorption properties were studied using low-temperature N2 physisorption and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption. It was shown that nitride formation proceeds through a sequence of phase transformations: NiMoO4 + MoO3 → Ni + NiMo + MoO2 → Ni + NiMo + Mo2N → Ni2Mo3N. The weight changes that were calculated from the proposed reactions were in agreement with the experimental data from thermogravimetry. The morphology of the powder changed from platelets and spheres for the oxide sample, to aggregates of needle-like particles for the intermediate product, to porous particles with an extended surface area for the nitride final product. The obtained results should prove useful for subsequent Ni2Mo3N based catalysts production process optimization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ni-Containing Catalysts)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle NOx Removal by Selective Catalytic Reduction with Ammonia over a Hydrotalcite-Derived NiFe Mixed Oxide
Catalysts 2018, 8(9), 384; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8090384
Received: 24 July 2018 / Revised: 5 September 2018 / Accepted: 6 September 2018 / Published: 8 September 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (4825 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A series of NiFe mixed oxide catalysts were prepared via calcining hydrotalcite-like precursors for the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) with NH3 (NH3-SCR). Multiple characterizations revealed that catalytic performance was highly dependent on the phase composition, [...] Read more.
A series of NiFe mixed oxide catalysts were prepared via calcining hydrotalcite-like precursors for the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) with NH3 (NH3-SCR). Multiple characterizations revealed that catalytic performance was highly dependent on the phase composition, which was vulnerable to the calcination temperature. The MOx phase (M = Ni or Fe) formed at a lower calcination temperature would induce more favorable contents of Fe2+ and Ni3+ and as a result contribute to the better redox capacity and low-temperature activity. In comparison, NiFe2O4 phase emerged at a higher calcination temperature, which was expected to generate more Fe species on the surface and lead to a stable structure, better high-temperature activity, preferable SO2 resistance, and catalytic stability. The optimum NiFe-500 catalyst incorporated the above virtues and afforded excellent denitration (DeNOx) activity (over 85% NOx conversion with nearly 98% N2 selectivity in the region of 210–360 °C), superior SO2 resistance, and catalytic stability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ni-Containing Catalysts)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Highly Loaded and Dispersed Ni2P/Al2O3 Catalyst with High Selectivity for Hydrogenation of Acetophenone
Catalysts 2018, 8(8), 309; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8080309
Received: 8 July 2018 / Revised: 24 July 2018 / Accepted: 27 July 2018 / Published: 30 July 2018
PDF Full-text (4718 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Highly loaded and dispersed Ni2P/Al2O3 catalyst was prepared by the phosphidation of Ni/Al2O3 catalyst with Ni loading of 80 wt.% in liquid phase and compared with the Ni/Al2O3 catalyst for the hydrogenation [...] Read more.
Highly loaded and dispersed Ni2P/Al2O3 catalyst was prepared by the phosphidation of Ni/Al2O3 catalyst with Ni loading of 80 wt.% in liquid phase and compared with the Ni/Al2O3 catalyst for the hydrogenation of acetophenone. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) etc. were used to characterize the textural and structural properties of the prepared catalysts. It was found that the Ni/Al2O3 and Ni2P/Al2O3 catalyst possessed high surface area, loading and dispersion. The Ni/Al2O3 catalyst had higher apparent activity while the Ni2P/Al2O3 catalyst had higher intrinsic activity for the hydrogenation of acetophenone (AP). Remarkably, the Ni2P/Al2O3 catalyst exhibited high selectivity to 1-phenylethanol, due to repulsion of the phosphorous (Pδ) for phenyl group and attraction of the nickel (Niδ+) for oxygen atom of carbonyl group, leading to preferential hydrogenation of carbonyl group in acetophenone. The effect of the particle size of the catalyst on the chemical selectivity might be another reason for high selectivity on the Ni2P/Al2O3 catalyst. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ni-Containing Catalysts)
Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Ni Catalysts for Biomass Valorization
Author: Chi-Wing Tsang
Affiliation: Department of Construction Technology and Engineering, Technological and Higher Education Institute of Hong Kong, 133 Shing Tai Road, Chai Wan, Hong Kong
Correspondence: [email protected]

Title: The Development of Ni-containing Electrocatalysts Designed for Energy Conversion
Authors: Yangshan Xie, Rongming Cai, Shihe Yang, Xia Long
Affiliation: Chinese Acad Sci, Fujian Inst Res Struct Matter, Fujian Prov Key Lab Nanomat, Fuzhou 350002, China
Correspondence: [email protected]
Abstract: We will review the current development of nickel-containing electrocatalysts in energy conversion applications including oxygen evolution reaction, hydrogen evolution reaction, oxygen reduction reaction, and carbon dioxide reduction reaction. The review will start with introducing synthesis strategies of nickel-containing catalysts. And then particular emphasis will be placed on the roles of the surface property and microstructure of the catalysts, as well as the synergistic effects between nickel ions and other transition metal ions on the catalytic performance. Finally, challenges and a forward-looking outlook assessing unexplored research areas and future directions is suggested. The insight of this review will spur more interest in designing the nickel-containing catalyst for energy conversion applications and propel the development of this important area.

Title: Hydrogen Production via the Glycerol Steam Reforming Reaction over Ni/Αl2O3 and Ni/Attapulgite Catalysts
Authors: N.D. Charisiou, K.N. Papageridis, G. Siakavelas, M.A. Baker, S.J. Hinder, V. Sebastian, K. Polychronopoulou, M.A. Goula
Affiliation: Department of Environmental Engineering, School of Technological Applications, Western Macedonia University of Applied Sciences, GR –50100, Koila, Kozani, Greece
Correspondence: [email protected]

Title: Nickel Containing Catalysts for the Selective Hydrodeoxygenation of Bio-derived Substrates
Authors: Andrey V. Chistyakov
Affiliation: A. V. Topchiev Institute of Petrochemical Synthesis, Russian Academy of Sciences, 119991 Moscow, Russian Federation
Correspondence: [email protected]
Abstract: Green and renewable hydrocarbons prepared from catalytic hydrodeoxygenation will have a great impact on efficient ways to alleviate the global warming and drive chemical and energy companies towards a more sustainable use of resources industrial application. Biomass-derived platform molecules such as lignin and bio-oil, vegetable oils, and furfurals are of immense importance because these can be upgraded into other useful chemicals and fuels by hydrodeoxygenation. Nickel is one of the most widely used elements in metal based catalysts and its well know since the day of Ranay as hydrogen activator. But in order to provide a superior HDO performances, catalyst should have not only good hydrogen bonds dissociation ability, but also carbonyl and carboxyl groups both adsorption and activation abilities, suitable acid strength, and low carbon deposition performances. Thus despite the huge success and wide applications of the Ni catalysts in industry, usually monometallic Ni catalysts are not able to meet the activity, selectivity, and stability requirements in considered reactions. Analysis of a large number of works showed that the introduction of the second metal into the monometallic catalyst results in formation of a nano-sized alloy particles that have electronic and chemical properties that are distinct from those of their parent metals, and significantly enhanced catalytic performance. The present review highlights a detailed overview of the development of nickel-based mano- and bimetallic catalysts supported on different materials. In addition this review article provides ample information on efforts made by various researchers concerning production of green hydrocarbons by HDO of bio-derived substrates.

Title: Mechanochemical Leaching of Spent Ni-Mo HDS Catalyst in H2SO4 Solutions
Authors: Sedat ILHAN
Affiliation: Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, 3420 Avcilar, Istanbul-Turkey
Correspondence: [email protected]
Abstract: Ni-Mo Hydrodesulphurization (HDS) catalyst usually contains Mo and Ni compounds supported on g-Al2O3 and V that comes from crude oil. Therefore Ni-Mo HDS catalyst is one of the most important secondary resource for recovery of Mo, Ni and V. Mechanochemical leaching method was chosen due to having combined intensive effect of grinding and leaching which in turn enhances extraction rate of valuable metals. Prior to the mechanochemical leaching experiments, spent Ni-Mo HDS catalyst was roasted at 500 oC for the elimination of residual oil and volatile compounds that bearing S and C. It is determined that roasted catalyst contains 56.95 % of Al2O3, 28.08 % of MoO3, 4.05 % of NiO, 1.15 % of V2O5, 3.33 % of SiO2 and % of 4.84 P2O5. Mechanochemical leaching of roasted Ni-Mo HDS catalyst was carried out using 100 g of zirconia grinding balls, ball/dust ratio of 10, 20 and 30, 250 mL H2SO4 solution with 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2 and 4 M, for 15, 30, 60, 120, 180 and 240 minutes in a planetary mill with 300, 400 and 500 rpm mill speeds for the investigation of leaching behavior of elements in roasted Ni-Mo HDS catalyst. Extraction rates of 68 %, 98 %, 76 %, 22 %, 8% and 95 % were obtained from the experiment carried out using ball/dust ratio of 20, 500 rpm mill speed, 2 M H2SO4 solution for 120 minutes reaction time for Mo, Ni, V, Al, Si and P, respectively.

 

Catalysts EISSN 2073-4344 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top