Novel Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Techniques for Next Generation Molecular Imaging of Cancer

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694). This special issue belongs to the section "Methods and Technologies Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 1335

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Werner Siemens Imaging Center, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany
2. Cluster of Excellence iFIT (EXC 2180) “Image-Guided and Functionally Instructed Tumor Therapies”, University of Tuebingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany
3. German Cancer Consortium, DKFZ Partner Site Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany
Interests: multimodal imaging; metabolic imaging; hybrid PET-MRI imaging; metabolic sensors; metallomics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, 81675 München, Germany
2. German Cancer Consortium, DKTK Partner Site Munich, 80336 Munich, Germany
Interests: biomedical magnetic resonance; hyperpolarization techniques; hyperpolarized probe molecules; diffusion-weighted imaging; molecular imaging

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Partner Site Freiburg, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
2. Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiology, Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Killianstr. 5a, 79106 Freiburg, Germany
Interests: low field MRI and NMR; nuclear hyperpolarization; hyperpolarization method development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Despite progress in cancer therapy through surgery, radiation, and targeted therapies, the clinical success of many anti-cancer strategies remains discouraging because the therapy is usually not tailored to the patient’s tumor biology. Treatment plans require a better understanding of the relationship between individual tumor biology and a therapeutic approach to improve patient outcomes. The need for novel technologies to progress from late-stage to early-stage detection and to match patients with the most promising therapeutic strategy is essential for precision medicine. Imaging biomarkers for cancer provide a quantitative and/or qualitative assessment of tumor biology images with spatial and temporal resolution. The development of molecular imaging techniques to depict physiological, metabolic, and cellular processes within tumors is needed for treatment selection and to predict tumor response to treatment, before conventional changes in tumor size can be measured. In this Special Issue, we want to highlight “Novel Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Techniques for Next Generation Molecular Imaging of Cancer, including hyperpolarized MR, CEST, multimodal PET/MRI, MR contrast agents, and functional imaging.

Prof. Dr. Andre F. Martins
Prof. Dr. Franz Schilling
Dr. Andreas Benjamin Schmidt
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cancer
  • molecular imaging
  • functional imaging
  • MRI
  • hyperpolarization
  • biosensors
  • metabolism
  • dDNP
  • PHIP
  • SEOP
  • parahydrogen

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

15 pages, 2544 KiB  
Article
Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Macrophage Response to Radiation Therapy
by Harrison Yang, Brock Howerton, Logan Brown, Tadahide Izumi, Dennis Cheek, J. Anthony Brandon, Francesc Marti, Roberto Gedaly, Reuben Adatorwovor and Fanny Chapelin
Cancers 2023, 15(24), 5874; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers15245874 - 17 Dec 2023
Viewed by 990
Abstract
Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive imaging modality which, in conjunction with biopsies, provide a qualitative assessment of tumor response to treatment. Intravenous injection of contrast agents such as fluorine (19F) nanoemulsions labels systemic macrophages, which can, then, be [...] Read more.
Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive imaging modality which, in conjunction with biopsies, provide a qualitative assessment of tumor response to treatment. Intravenous injection of contrast agents such as fluorine (19F) nanoemulsions labels systemic macrophages, which can, then, be tracked in real time with MRI. This method can provide quantifiable insights into the behavior of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in the tumor microenvironment and macrophage recruitment during therapy. Methods: Female mice received mammary fat pad injections of murine breast or colon cancer cell lines. The mice then received an intravenous 19F nanoemulsion injection, followed by a baseline 19F MRI. For each cancer model, half of the mice then received 8 Gy of localized radiation therapy (RT), while others remained untreated. The mice were monitored for two weeks for tumor growth and 9F signal using MRI. Results: Across both cohorts, the RT-treated groups presented significant tumor growth reduction or arrest, contrary to the untreated groups. Similarly, the fluorine signal in treated groups increased significantly as early as four days post therapy. The fluorine signal change correlated to tumor volumes irrespective of time. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the potential of 19F MRI to non-invasively track macrophages during radiation therapy and its prognostic value with regard to tumor growth. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop