Ventilation and Air Quality in Buildings

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 5760

Special Issue Editors

Tianjin Key Laboratory of Indoor Air Environmental Quality Control, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, China
Interests: measurement and numerical simulation of air environment; indoor pollutant control; air physics

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Guest Editor
School of Built Environment, Massey University, Auckland 0745, New Zealand
Interests: prediction modelling; energy behaviour; zero carbon and sustainability

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Guest Editor
Department of Civil & Natural Resource Engineering, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8041, New Zealand
Interests: lighting design for energy efficiency; light measurement; domestic hot water; urban building energy modelling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue mainly assembles the novel findings regarding the ventilation and IAQ in buildings. The scope of the work includes, but is not limited to, the following:

-Ventilation;

-Air distribution systems;

-Insulation;

-Thermal comfort;

-Measurement;

-Simulation;

-BIM;

-Heating–cooling demand.

This Special Issue will be edited by researchers in the field of architecture from China and New Zealand. The submission deadline for this Special Issue is 31 August 2024. This Special Issue belongs to the Building Energy, Physics, Environment, and Systems.

Dr. Xiong Shen
Dr. Priya Vishnu
Dr. Daniel Bishop
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ventilation
  • measurement
  • numerical method
  • low-carbon building
  • indoor air quality
  • wind environment
  • thermal comfort
  • landscape architecture

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 11301 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Enclosure Layout on Wind Environment in Chinese Classic Landscape Gardens: A Case Study of Beijing’s Summer Palace Ruins Garden
by Zefa Wang, Min Wang, Yaolong Wang, Tiantian Huang, Jing Chen and Tingfeng Liu
Buildings 2024, 14(1), 280; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14010280 - 19 Jan 2024
Viewed by 934
Abstract
The design of the enclosure layout is crucial in establishing a comfortable wind environment in Chinese classic landscape gardens. The Ruins Park of the Old Summer Palace exemplifies the mountain construction techniques used in classical Chinese flat gardens, with a diverse and illustrative [...] Read more.
The design of the enclosure layout is crucial in establishing a comfortable wind environment in Chinese classic landscape gardens. The Ruins Park of the Old Summer Palace exemplifies the mountain construction techniques used in classical Chinese flat gardens, with a diverse and illustrative spatial layout of the hills. In this study, we focused on the earthen hill space of the Old Palace in the Summer Palace Ruins Park. We compared and analyzed the effects of different enclosure layouts of earthen hill spaces on the summer monsoon wind environment. This was achieved via on-site measurements and simulations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The results show the following: (1) The direction index of the enclosure layout of the earthen hill space affects wind speed, comfort, and ventilation. Increasing the index reduces speed and comfort but improves ventilation. (2) Increasing the density index of the enclosure layout of the earthen hill space leads to a decrease in wind speed and wind comfort and improved ventilation. (3) Conversely, increasing the area index of the enclosure layout of the earthen hill space results in an increase in wind speed, which can result in better wind comfort but can also lead to poor ventilation. Overall, the results suggest that careful consideration should be given to the enclosure layout of landscape gardens to ensure optimal wind conditions within the space. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ventilation and Air Quality in Buildings)
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26 pages, 5880 KiB  
Article
Evaluating Indoor Air Quality Monitoring Devices for Healthy Homes
by Terri Peters and Cheng Zhen
Buildings 2024, 14(1), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14010102 - 30 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2458
Abstract
In light of COVID-19, people are increasingly anxious about indoor air quality data in places where they live and work. Access to this data using a consumer-grade air quality monitor has become a way of giving agency to building users so that they [...] Read more.
In light of COVID-19, people are increasingly anxious about indoor air quality data in places where they live and work. Access to this data using a consumer-grade air quality monitor has become a way of giving agency to building users so that they can understand the ventilation effectiveness of the spaces where they spend their time. Methods: Fourteen low-cost, air quality devices marketed to consumers were tested (seven types, two of each product): AirBird, Airthings View Plus, Aranet4 Home, Awair Omni, Eve Room, Laser Egg + CO2, and Purple Air PA-1. The study focus was accuracy and useability using three methods: a low-cost laboratory setting to test accuracy for CO2; a comparison to a calibrated, research grade meter for particulate matter (PM2.5), temperature, and relative humidity; and short-term field testing in a residential environment to understand the quality of feedback given to users. Results: Relating to accuracy, all devices were within acceptable ranges for temperature, relative humidity, and CO2, and only one brand’s results met the accuracy threshold with the research grade monitor when testing PM2.5. In terms of usability, a significant variation in response time and data visualization was found on the devices or in the smartphone applications. Conclusions: While accuracy in IAQ data is important, in low-cost air quality devices marketed to consumers it is just as important that the data be presented in a way that can be used to empower people to make decisions and modify their indoor environment. We concluded that response time, user-interface, data sharing, and visualization are important parameters that may be overlooked if a study just focuses on accuracy. The design of the device, including its appearance, size, portability, screen brightness, and sound or light warning, must also be considered. The act of measuring is important, and more studies should focus on how users interpret and react to building performance data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ventilation and Air Quality in Buildings)
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16 pages, 5560 KiB  
Article
Influence of Doorway Position on Wind Comfort in Beijing Quadrangle Dwellings
by Zefa Wang, Tingfeng Liu, Xiaogang Wu, Jing Chen and Xujun Liang
Buildings 2023, 13(10), 2557; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13102557 - 10 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 785
Abstract
During the Qing Dynasty and Republic of China, Three Essentials of Dwelling was a much-sought-after approach for the design of quadrangle dwellings, with the primary focus being on the positioning of the doorways. By employing vector data of typical quadrangle dwellings in Beijing [...] Read more.
During the Qing Dynasty and Republic of China, Three Essentials of Dwelling was a much-sought-after approach for the design of quadrangle dwellings, with the primary focus being on the positioning of the doorways. By employing vector data of typical quadrangle dwellings in Beijing to construct an ideal model that complies with the Three Essentials of Dwelling setting, this study aims to investigate the impact of the doorway position on the wind comfort of quadrangle dwellings through CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation, by comparing and analyzing the wind comfort of quadrangle courtyards with different doorway position layouts. The results are as follows: (1) Placing doors in the windward position during the season can make a significant difference in the courtyard wind comfort of quadrangle dwellings. (2) Compared to the direction of the doorway, the position of the doorway significantly affects the wind comfort of the courtyard in a quadrangle dwelling. (3) Keeping the position of the doorway constant, adjusting the height of the main room can be a successful strategy to improve the wind comfort of the courtyard in a quadrangle dwelling. (4) There is no link between environmental quality assessment and wind environmental quality assessment in Three Essentials of Dwelling. This study proves that the positioning of doorways can optimize the wind comfort in quadrangle dwellings, demonstrating the ancient Chinese’s ecological acumen in the layout of quadrangle houses, and providing useful guidance to designers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ventilation and Air Quality in Buildings)
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25 pages, 22126 KiB  
Article
Numerical Simulation of the Ventilation and Fire Conditions in an Underground Garage with an Induced Ventilation System
by Zhitao Wang, Xue Zhou, Xiangyuan Zhu and Jiying Liu
Buildings 2023, 13(8), 2074; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13082074 - 15 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1082
Abstract
The increasing quantity of air pollutants generated by automobiles can cause significant harm in relatively enclosed indoor environments. Studying the distribution of pollutants under different conditions in underground parking garages is of great significance for improving indoor air quality and reducing casualties in [...] Read more.
The increasing quantity of air pollutants generated by automobiles can cause significant harm in relatively enclosed indoor environments. Studying the distribution of pollutants under different conditions in underground parking garages is of great significance for improving indoor air quality and reducing casualties in the event of a fire. This article presents a geometric model of an underground parking garage based on PHOENICS modeling. The related results of CO concentration distribution and fire temperature distribution under ventilation and fire conditions are obtained. Based on the CO concentration and velocity distribution as well as the temperature distribution during a fire, reasonable suggestions are proposed to improve indoor air quality and reduce casualty rates in fire incidents. The results show that under ventilation conditions, adjusting the position of the induced ventilation fan can maintain CO concentrations below 30 ppm in partitions one to three and below 37 ppm in partitions four to six. The temperature of smoke gases remained below 50 °C during the evacuation time, and only a small area exhibited CO levels exceeding 2000 ppm. The existing ventilation exhaust system provides effective fire protection, as it minimally affects personnel evacuation due to the relatively lower smoke temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ventilation and Air Quality in Buildings)
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