Special Issue "Olfaction as a Marker for Psychiatric and Neurological Diseases"

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Wissam El-Hage
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychiatry, CHRU de Tours, Université de Tours, Inserm, U 1253, iBrain, CIC 1415, France
Interests: treatment-resistant depression; post-traumatic stress disorder; markers for psychiatric diseases; olfaction; treatment of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Olfaction can be measured and altered at different levels. Olfactory disorders have various forms (anosmia, partial anosmia, hyposmia, microsmia, dysosmia, phantosmia, olfactory agnosia, hyperosmia) and causes (e.g., following accidents, psychiatric and neurological conditions, aging, medical interventions, and exposure to environmental chemicals). Olfactory dysfunctions and biases can be characterized and thus constitute potential markers for psychiatric and neurological disorders, in which dysfunctions can be considered as either a consequence of the disease or a vulnerability factor.

This Special Issue will publish contributions about innovative diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of olfactory disorders, and original research articles advancing our understanding of “Olfaction as a Marker for Psychiatric and Neurological diseases”. Reviews providing an analytical perspective on the existing literature are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Wissam El-Hage
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Olfaction
  • Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures
  • Imaging
  • Brain
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Alzheimer

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Functional Connectivity between the Resting-State Olfactory Network and the Hippocampus in Alzheimer’s Disease
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(12), 338; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9120338 - 25 Nov 2019
Abstract
Olfactory impairment is associated with prodromal Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and is a risk factor for the development of dementia. AD pathology is known to disrupt brain regions instrumental in olfactory information processing, such as the primary olfactory cortex (POC), the hippocampus, and other [...] Read more.
Olfactory impairment is associated with prodromal Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and is a risk factor for the development of dementia. AD pathology is known to disrupt brain regions instrumental in olfactory information processing, such as the primary olfactory cortex (POC), the hippocampus, and other temporal lobe structures. This selective vulnerability suggests that the functional connectivity (FC) between the olfactory network (ON), consisting of the POC, insula and orbital frontal cortex (OFC) (Tobia et al., 2016), and the hippocampus may be impaired in early stage AD. Yet, the development trajectory of this potential FC impairment remains unclear. Here, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) to investigate FC changes between the ON and hippocampus in four groups: aged-matched cognitively normal (CN), early mild cognitive impairment (EMCI), late mild cognitive impairment (LMCI), and AD. FC was calculated using low frequency fMRI signal fluctuations in the ON and hippocampus (Tobia et al., 2016). We found that the FC between the ON and the right hippocampus became progressively disrupted across disease states, with significant differences between EMCI and LMCI groups. Additionally, there were no significant differences in gray matter hippocampal volumes between EMCI and LMCI groups. Lastly, the FC between the ON and hippocampus was significantly correlated with neuropsychological test scores, suggesting that it is related to cognition in a meaningful way. These findings provide the first in vivo evidence for the involvement of FC between the ON and hippocampus in AD pathology. Results suggest that functional connectivity (FC) between the olfactory network (ON) and hippocampus may be a sensitive marker for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression, preceding gray matter volume loss. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Olfaction as a Marker for Psychiatric and Neurological Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle
Emotional and Phenomenological Properties of Odor-Evoked Autobiographical Memories in Alzheimer’s Disease
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(6), 135; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9060135 - 10 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Autobiographical memory, which contains all personal memories relative to our identity, has been found to be impaired in Alzheimer’ Disease (AD). Recent research has demonstrated that odor may serve as a powerful cue for the recovery of autobiographical memories in AD. Building on [...] Read more.
Autobiographical memory, which contains all personal memories relative to our identity, has been found to be impaired in Alzheimer’ Disease (AD). Recent research has demonstrated that odor may serve as a powerful cue for the recovery of autobiographical memories in AD. Building on this research, we investigated emotional characteristics (arousal and valence) and subjective reliving of odor-evoked autobiographical memories in AD. We also investigated the relationship between these characteristics and depression. To this end, we invited participants with mild AD and controls to retrieve autobiographical memories after odor exposure or without odor. Results showed higher arousal, subjective reliving and more positive memories after odor exposure compared with the odor-free condition, these differences being observed only in AD participants. We also found that emotion (arousal and valence) and subjective reliving triggered by odor were associated with depressive symptoms in AD. These findings demonstrate that odor may be a useful cue to trigger more detailed, vivid and positive events in AD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Olfaction as a Marker for Psychiatric and Neurological Diseases)
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