Special Issue "The Study of Eye Movements in Infancy"

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 April 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. David Kelly
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Kent, School of Psychology, Keynes College, Canterbury CT2 7NP, Kent, CT2 7NP, England
Interests: eye movements; oculomotor control; cognition; infancy; face processing; developmental disorders

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the study of infant cognition, researchers are required to assess abilities without being able to provide verbal instruction or receive verbal responses. Consequently, the measurement of looking behaviour has become a fundamental technique for investigating cognitive development in preverbal populations. While classic paradigms such as preferential looking and habituation recovery have greatly advanced our knowledge about how infants see and make sense of the world, recent advances in eye-tracking allow us to now study the precise spatial and temporal dynamics of eye movement behaviour. As a result of these advances, we are at the advent of an exciting new phase in developmental psychology and cognitive neuroscience in which we can explore infant visual and cognitive development with far greater accuracy and objectivity. In summary, the implementation of eye-tracking technology in our research has the potential to revolutionise our understanding of infant cognition.

I am therefore delighted to announce that this Special Issue will seek to compile a series of articles that use eye-tracking to explore any aspect of infant cognition, vision and/or oculomotor control. Additionally, we welcome any articles that evaluate the efficacy of different eye-tracking systems, fixation and saccade parsing algorithms, newly developed analysis tools/methods and/or data precision and robustness in general.

Dr. David Kelly
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Eye movements
  • Visual development
  • Cognitive development
  • Oculomotor control
  • Infancy

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Infant Understanding of Different Forms of Social Exclusion
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(9), 227; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9090227 - 07 Sep 2019
Abstract
In a series of eye-tracking studies, we investigated preverbal infants’ understanding of social exclusion by analyzing their gaze behaviors as they were familiarized with animations depicting social acceptance and explicit or implicit social exclusion. In addition, we implemented preferential reaching and anticipatory looking [...] Read more.
In a series of eye-tracking studies, we investigated preverbal infants’ understanding of social exclusion by analyzing their gaze behaviors as they were familiarized with animations depicting social acceptance and explicit or implicit social exclusion. In addition, we implemented preferential reaching and anticipatory looking paradigms to further assess understanding of outcomes. Across all experiments (n = 81), it was found that 7–9 month-old infants exhibited non-random visual scanning and gaze behaviors and responded systematically and above random chance in their choice of character and, to some extent, in their anticipation of the movement of a neutral character during a test trial. Together, the results suggest that not only do preverbal infants follow and understand third party social events, such as acceptance and exclusion, but that they also update their representations of particular characters as events unfold and evaluate characters on the basis of their actions, as well as the consequences of those actions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Study of Eye Movements in Infancy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1.Natsuki Atagi ([email protected]);University of California
2.Roy Hessels ([email protected]);Utrecht University
3.JenniferRennels([email protected])University of Las Vegas
4.Shannon Ross-Sheehy ([email protected]);University of Tennessee
5.Olivier Pascalis ([email protected]);University Grenoble-Alpes
 
6.Anna Krasotkina ([email protected]);University of Giessen
7.Jennifer Wagner ([email protected]);CUNY College of Staten Island
8.Min Hooi Yoong ([email protected]);Sunway University
Back to TopTop