Special Issue "Biology of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor: Relevance for Disorders of the Central Nervous System"

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Developmental Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Maarten Van den Buuse
Website
Guest Editor
School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3086, Australia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Clinical, animal model, and molecular studies have shown that the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) plays an important role in brain development, neuroplasticity, and cognition. Deficits in BDNF signalling have been implicated in several neurological and psychiatric disorders, and cumulative research suggests targeting BDNF signalling may be a viable treatment option. Already, it is clear that the mechanisms of action of clinically used drugs, such as antidepressants, may include changes in BDNF signalling. The effects of more directly targeting BDNF receptors are also being studied increasingly. Polymorphisms in the BDNF gene result in differential risk of CNS disorders, and it is possible that stratifying patient populations based on BDNF genetic profiles may enhance treatment success. The role of BDNF in brain function is often sex-specific and depends on the age and developmental stage of the subject.

Recent literature has shown rapid developments in pre-clinical and clinical research into the role of BDNF in the CNS, including the use of novel sophisticated animal models. This Special Issue comprises a series of review and research papers providing both an overview and update of the multi-factorial role of BDNF in the CNS.

Prof. Maarten van den Buuse
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • BDNF
  • Neuroplasticity
  • Brain development
  • Cognition
  • Depression
  • Estrogen
  • Val66met
  • TrkB

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
The BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism Modulates Resilience of Neurological Functioning to Brain Ageing and Dementia: A Narrative Review
Brain Sci. 2020, 10(4), 195; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10040195 - 25 Mar 2020
Abstract
Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) is an abundant and multi-function neurotrophin in the brain. It is released following neuronal activity and is believed to be particularly important in strengthening neural networks. A common variation in the BDNF gene, a valine to methionine substitution at [...] Read more.
Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) is an abundant and multi-function neurotrophin in the brain. It is released following neuronal activity and is believed to be particularly important in strengthening neural networks. A common variation in the BDNF gene, a valine to methionine substitution at codon 66 (Val66Met), has been linked to differential expression of BDNF associated with experience-dependent plasticity. The Met allele has been associated with reduced production of BDNF following neuronal stimulation, which suggests a potential role of this variation with respect to how the nervous system may respond to challenges, such as brain ageing and related neurodegenerative conditions (e.g., dementia and Alzheimer’s disease). The current review examines the potential of the BDNF Val66Met variation to modulate an individual’s susceptibility and trajectory through cognitive changes associated with ageing and dementia. On balance, research to date indicates that the BDNF Met allele at this codon is potentially associated with a detrimental influence on the level of cognitive functioning in older adults and may also impart increased risk of progression to dementia. Furthermore, recent studies also show that this genetic variation may modulate an individual’s response to interventions targeted at building cognitive resilience to conditions that cause dementia. Full article
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