Fluorescence Based Sensing Technologies

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2015) | Viewed by 52004

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
School of Engineering and Built Environment, Glasgow Caledonian University, Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA, UK
Interests: fluorescence spectroscopy; fluorescence based sensors; FRET; FLIM; plasmonics; Raman spectroscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The employment of fluorescence based technologies to biosensing applications has grown at a rapid rate over recent years and is now considered to be a very powerful tool in the elucidation of biological processes. The major benefit of employing extrinsic fluorophores is that they can be designed to sense specific biomolecules, study biological processes within membranes and cells, target specific locations within a cell, and research biomolecule interactions while preserving spatial and temporal cellular processes.

Fluorescence technologies now used in biosensing range from fluorescence spectra and lifetime studies through fluorescence quenching, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF), to fluorescence imaging, both in the intensity and lifetime domains.

This Special Issue focuses on all aspects of fluorescence spectroscopy relating to biological applications. Areas of application include, but are not limited to, immunoassays, cell sorting, cell structure, membrane biophysics, protein science, food and plant science, biosensors, bioreceptor arrays, and medical diagnostics.

Dr. A. Sheila Holmes-Smith
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • luminescence
  • fluorescence
  • FRET
  • FLIM
  • metal enhanced fluorescence
  • anisotropy
  • immunoassay
  • biosensor
  • nanoparticle

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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289 KiB  
Editorial
Introduction to Special Issue on “Fluorescence-Based Sensing Technologies”
by A. Sheila Holmes-Smith
Biosensors 2015, 5(4), 616-617; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios5040616 - 10 Oct 2015
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4228
Abstract
The application of fluorescence-based technologies to sensing applications in biosciences and related industries is growing. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence Based Sensing Technologies)

Research

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735 KiB  
Article
Characterization of Lactate Sensors Based on Lactate Oxidase and Palladium Benzoporphyrin Immobilized in Hydrogels
by Liam P. Andrus, Rachel Unruh, Natalie A. Wisniewski and Michael J. McShane
Biosensors 2015, 5(3), 398-416; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios5030398 - 7 Jul 2015
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 9751
Abstract
An optical biosensor for lactate detection is described. By encapsulating enzyme-phosphor sensing molecules within permeable hydrogel materials, lactate-sensitive emission lifetimes were achieved. The relative amount of monomer was varied to compare three homo- and co-polymer materials: poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) and two copolymers of [...] Read more.
An optical biosensor for lactate detection is described. By encapsulating enzyme-phosphor sensing molecules within permeable hydrogel materials, lactate-sensitive emission lifetimes were achieved. The relative amount of monomer was varied to compare three homo- and co-polymer materials: poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) and two copolymers of pHEMA and poly(acrylamide) (pAam). Diffusion analysis demonstrated the ability to control lactate transport by varying the hydrogel composition, while having a minimal effect on oxygen diffusion. Sensors displayed the desired dose-variable response to lactate challenges, highlighting the tunable, diffusion-controlled nature of the sensing platform. Short-term repeated exposure tests revealed enhanced stability for sensors comprising hydrogels with acrylamide additives; after an initial “break-in” period, signal retention was 100% for 15 repeated cycles. Finally, because this study describes the modification of a previously developed glucose sensor for lactate analysis, it demonstrates the potential for mix-and-match enzyme-phosphor-hydrogel sensing for use in future multi-analyte sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence Based Sensing Technologies)
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664 KiB  
Communication
A Signal-On Fluorosensor Based on Quench-Release Principle for Sensitive Detection of Antibiotic Rapamycin
by Hee-Jin Jeong, Shuya Itayama and Hiroshi Ueda
Biosensors 2015, 5(2), 131-140; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios5020131 - 26 Mar 2015
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 7924
Abstract
An antibiotic rapamycin is one of the most commonly used immunosuppressive drugs, and also implicated for its anti-cancer activity. Hence, the determination of its blood level after organ transplantation or tumor treatment is of great concern in medicine. Although there are several rapamycin [...] Read more.
An antibiotic rapamycin is one of the most commonly used immunosuppressive drugs, and also implicated for its anti-cancer activity. Hence, the determination of its blood level after organ transplantation or tumor treatment is of great concern in medicine. Although there are several rapamycin detection methods, many of them have limited sensitivity, and/or need complicated procedures and long assay time. As a novel fluorescent biosensor for rapamycin, here we propose “Q’-body”, which works on the fluorescence quench-release principle inspired by the antibody-based quenchbody (Q-body) technology. We constructed rapamycin Q’-bodies by linking the two interacting domains FKBP12 and FRB, whose association is triggered by rapamycin. The fusion proteins were each incorporated position-specifically with one of fluorescence dyes ATTO520, tetramethylrhodamine, or ATTO590 using a cell-free translation system. As a result, rapid rapamycin dose-dependent fluorescence increase derived of Q’-bodies was observed, especially for those with ATTO520 with a lowest detection limit of 0.65 nM, which indicates its utility as a novel fluorescent biosensor for rapamycin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence Based Sensing Technologies)
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Review

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5455 KiB  
Review
Use of Time-Resolved Fluorescence to Monitor Bioactive Compounds in Plant Based Foodstuffs
by M. Adília Lemos, Katarína Sárniková, Francesca Bot, Monica Anese and Graham Hungerford
Biosensors 2015, 5(3), 367-397; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios5030367 - 26 Jun 2015
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 7985
Abstract
The study of compounds that exhibit antioxidant activity has recently received much interest in the food industry because of their potential health benefits. Most of these compounds are plant based, such as polyphenolics and carotenoids, and there is a need to monitor them [...] Read more.
The study of compounds that exhibit antioxidant activity has recently received much interest in the food industry because of their potential health benefits. Most of these compounds are plant based, such as polyphenolics and carotenoids, and there is a need to monitor them from the field through processing and into the body. Ideally, a monitoring technique should be non-invasive with the potential for remote capabilities. The application of the phenomenon of fluorescence has proved to be well suited, as many plant associated compounds exhibit fluorescence. The photophysical behaviour of fluorescent molecules is also highly dependent on their microenvironment, making them suitable probes to monitor changes in pH, viscosity and polarity, for example. Time-resolved fluorescence techniques have recently come to the fore, as they offer the ability to obtain more information, coupled with the fact that the fluorescence lifetime is an absolute measure, while steady state just provides relative and average information. In this work, we will present illustrative time-resolved measurements, rather than a comprehensive review, to show the potential of time-resolved fluorescence applied to the study of bioactive substances. The aim is to help assess if any changes occur in their form, going from extraction via storage and cooking to the interaction with serum albumin, a principal blood transport protein. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence Based Sensing Technologies)
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839 KiB  
Review
Development of Functional Fluorescent Molecular Probes for the Detection of Biological Substances
by Yoshio Suzuki and Kenji Yokoyama
Biosensors 2015, 5(2), 337-363; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios5020337 - 18 Jun 2015
Cited by 72 | Viewed by 11583
Abstract
This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information. Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors. Parameters that define the application of such sensors include intensity, decay time, anisotropy, quenching efficiency, and [...] Read more.
This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information. Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors. Parameters that define the application of such sensors include intensity, decay time, anisotropy, quenching efficiency, and luminescence energy transfer. To achieve selective (bio)molecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades. This review describes the immense variety of fluorescent probes that have been designed for the recognitions of ions, small and large molecules, and their biological applications in terms of intracellular fluorescent imaging techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence Based Sensing Technologies)
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694 KiB  
Review
Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Quantification of Receptor Pharmacology
by Ye Fang
Biosensors 2015, 5(2), 223-240; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios5020223 - 27 Apr 2015
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 9437
Abstract
Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy has been widely used as a single molecule imaging technique to study various fundamental aspects of cell biology, owing to its ability to selectively excite a very thin fluorescent volume immediately above the substrate on which the [...] Read more.
Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy has been widely used as a single molecule imaging technique to study various fundamental aspects of cell biology, owing to its ability to selectively excite a very thin fluorescent volume immediately above the substrate on which the cells are grown. However, TIRF microscopy has found little use in high content screening due to its complexity in instrumental setup and experimental procedures. Inspired by the recent demonstration of label-free evanescent wave biosensors for cell phenotypic profiling and drug screening with high throughput, we had hypothesized and demonstrated that TIRF imaging is also amenable to receptor pharmacology profiling. This paper reviews key considerations and recent applications of TIRF imaging for pharmacology profiling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence Based Sensing Technologies)
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