Special Issue "Biosensors for Environmental Applications"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Teresa A. P. Rocha-Santos
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) & Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: plastics; microplastics; development of analytical methodologies fit for purpose; fate and behavior of organic contaminants in the environment and during wastewater treatment
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Environmental pollution is a global problem that possesses hazardous effects on ecosystems and human health. The state of the environment can be evaluated using biosensors. They can also be used to identify trends in pollution and to control the efficiency of a remediation process. Biosensors are defined as analytical devices, whereas a biological material, a biologically derived material, or biomimic, is used as a biorecognition element associated or integrated within a physicochemical transducer or transducing microsystem. In this Special Issue research manuscripts discussing advances in the development of biosensors for environmental applications using biorecognition elements such as tissue, microorganisms, organelles, cell receptors, enzymes, antibodies, nucleic acids, natural products, recombinant antibodies, engineered proteins, aptamers, synthetic receptors, biomimetic catalysts, combinatorial ligands and, imprinted polymers are welcome. Manuscripts covering innovative biosensors based on transducing principles, such as piezoelectric, electrochemical, magnetic and optical for environmental applications, are also welcome. Advances and trends in biosensor development through the use bioelectronics, nanotechnology, miniaturization, fabrication/integration into platforms, microfluidic systems and fit for purpose can be also covered. Review papers are welcome.

Dr. Teresa A. P. Rocha-Santos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biosensors
  • Fit for purpose
  • Environmental pollution
  • Environmental monitoring
  • Environmental sensing
  • Bio-recognition elements

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Modified Biosensor for Cholinesterase Inhibitors with Guinea Green B as the Color Indicator
Biosensors 2018, 8(3), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8030081 - 04 Sep 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Colorimetric biosensors of cholinesterase inhibitors are ideal for fast, reliable, and very simple detection of agents in air, in water, and on surfaces. This paper describes an innovation of the Czech Detehit biosensor, which is based on a biochemical enzymatic reaction visualized by [...] Read more.
Colorimetric biosensors of cholinesterase inhibitors are ideal for fast, reliable, and very simple detection of agents in air, in water, and on surfaces. This paper describes an innovation of the Czech Detehit biosensor, which is based on a biochemical enzymatic reaction visualized by using Ellman’s reagent as a chromogenic indicator. The modification basically consists of a much more distinct color response of the biosensor, attained through optimization of the reaction system by using Guinea Green B as the indicator. The performance of the modified biosensor was verified on the chemical warfare agents (sarin, soman, cyclosarin, and VX) in water. The detection limits ascertained visually (with the naked eye) were about 0.001 µg/mL in water (exposure time 60 s, inhibition efficiency 25%). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors for Environmental Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Development of a Polyphenol Oxidase Biosensor from Jenipapo Fruit Extract (Genipa americana L.) and Determination of Phenolic Compounds in Textile Industrial Effluents
Biosensors 2018, 8(2), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8020047 - 15 May 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
In this work, an innovative polyphenol oxidase biosensor was developed from Jenipapo (Genipa americana L.) fruit and used to assess phenolic compounds in industrial effluent samples obtained from a textile industry located in Jaraguá-GO, Brasil. The biosensor was prepared and optimized according [...] Read more.
In this work, an innovative polyphenol oxidase biosensor was developed from Jenipapo (Genipa americana L.) fruit and used to assess phenolic compounds in industrial effluent samples obtained from a textile industry located in Jaraguá-GO, Brasil. The biosensor was prepared and optimized according to: the proportion of crude vegetal extract, pH and overall voltammetric parameters for differential pulse voltammetry. The calibration curve presented a linear interval from 10 to 310 µM (r2 = 0.9982) and a limit of detection of 7 µM. Biosensor stability was evaluated throughout 15 days, and it exhibited 88.22% of the initial response. The amount of catechol standard recovered post analysis varied between 87.50% and 96.00%. Moreover, the biosensor was able to detect phenolic compounds in a real sample, and the results were in accordance with standard spectrophotometric assays. Therefore, the innovatively-designed biosensor hereby proposed is a promising tool for phenolic compound detection and quantification when environmental contaminants are concerned. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors for Environmental Applications)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Enzyme-Based Electrochemical Biosensors for Microfluidic Platforms to Detect Pharmaceutical Residues in Wastewater
Biosensors 2019, 9(1), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9010041 - 15 Mar 2019
Cited by 8
Abstract
Emerging water pollutants such as pharmaceutical contaminants are suspected to induce adverse effects to human health. These molecules became worrisome due to their increasingly high concentrations in surface waters. Despite this alarming situation, available data about actual concentrations in the environment is rather [...] Read more.
Emerging water pollutants such as pharmaceutical contaminants are suspected to induce adverse effects to human health. These molecules became worrisome due to their increasingly high concentrations in surface waters. Despite this alarming situation, available data about actual concentrations in the environment is rather scarce, as it is not commonly monitored or regulated. This is aggravated even further by the absence of portable and reliable methods for their determination in the field. A promising way to tackle these issues is the use of enzyme-based and miniaturized biosensors for their electrochemical detection. Here, we present an overview of the latest developments in amperometric microfluidic biosensors that include, modeling and multiphysics simulation, design, manufacture, testing, and operation methods. Different types of biosensors are described, highlighting those based on oxidases/peroxidases and the integration with microfluidic platforms. Finally, issues regarding the stability of the biosensors and the enzyme molecules are discussed, as well as the most relevant approaches to address these obstacles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors for Environmental Applications)
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Open AccessReview
Application of Biosensors Based on Lipid Membranes for the Rapid Detection of Toxins
Biosensors 2018, 8(3), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8030061 - 26 Jun 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Lipid assemblies in the form of two dimensional films have been used extensively as biosensing platforms. These films exhibit certain similarities with cell membranes, thus providing a suitable means for the immobilization of proteinaceous moieties and, further, a number of intrinsic signal amplification [...] Read more.
Lipid assemblies in the form of two dimensional films have been used extensively as biosensing platforms. These films exhibit certain similarities with cell membranes, thus providing a suitable means for the immobilization of proteinaceous moieties and, further, a number of intrinsic signal amplification mechanisms. Their implementation in the detection of toxins yielded reliable and fast detectors for in field analyses of environmental and clinical samples. Some examples are presented herein, including aflatoxin and cholera toxin detection. The conditions and parameters that determine the analytical specifications of the lipid membrane sensors are discussed, advantages and technology bottlenecks are reviewed, and possible further developments are highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors for Environmental Applications)
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