Special Issue "Biosensors: 10th Anniversary Feature Papers"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. João P. da Costa
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) & Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: development of analytical methodologies fit for purpose; (bio)sensors, plastics; microplastics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Biosensors journal was funded in 2010. During these 10 years, Biosensors has published more than 50 special issues and 550 papers and welcomed breakthrough and innovative papers in biosensors developed for applications in food, health, security and defence, and environmental fields. The Biosensors journal also covers all aspects of sensors incorporating biorecognition elements, such as (but not limited to) enzymes, antibodies, nucleic acids, whole cells, tissues and organelles, and other biological or biologically inspired components. All the transducer principles are also covered in this journal. The year 2020 marks its 10th anniversary and its acceptance for coverage in the Science Citation Expanded (SCIE) in Web of Science. We are thus excited to celebrate the Biosensors journal’s 10th anniversary with a Special issue.

This Special Issue welcomes both research and review papers in the most recent and innovative developments of biosensors for applications in the food, health, security, and defence and environmental fields.

Dr. Teresa A. P. Rocha-Santos
Dr. João P. da Costa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Electromagnetic Piezoelectric Acoustic Sensor Detection of Extracellular Vesicles through Interaction with Detached Vesicle Proteins
Biosensors 2020, 10(11), 173; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10110173 - 11 Nov 2020
Viewed by 608
Abstract
An electromagnetic piezoelectric acoustic sensor (EMPAS) was used to study the non-specific adsorption of human red blood cell-derived extracellular vesicle preparations. Vesicle storage history (temperature and duration) highly affected the obtained results: The signal change, namely the frequency decrease of the crystal measured [...] Read more.
An electromagnetic piezoelectric acoustic sensor (EMPAS) was used to study the non-specific adsorption of human red blood cell-derived extracellular vesicle preparations. Vesicle storage history (temperature and duration) highly affected the obtained results: The signal change, namely the frequency decrease of the crystal measured at 20 °C, was negligibly small (<1 s−2) when the vesicle solutions had previously been stored at 4 °C, and was in the order of 10 s−2 when the vesicle solutions had been stored at −30 °C. Moreover, the rate of frequency decrease increased exponentially with the storage time at −30 °C. Upon a 4 °C storage period following the −30 °C storage period of the same sample, the measured frequency decrease dropped, suggesting a partial relaxation of the system. The results are explained by the disintegration of the vesicles triggered by the freeze–thaw cycle, likely due to the detachment of proteins from the vesicle surface as was proved by size-exclusion chromatography. Surface modification of the sensor crystal provided the possibility of signal enhancement, as the maximum rate of the frequency change for the same vesicle concentrations was higher on hydrophobic, octadecyl trichlorosilane–modified quartz than on hydrophilic, bare quartz. The EMPAS signal has been associated with the amount of detached proteins, which in turn is proportional to the originating vesicle concentration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors: 10th Anniversary Feature Papers)
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Open AccessArticle
Yeast-Based Fluorescent Sensors for the Simultaneous Detection of Estrogenic and Androgenic Compounds, Coupled with High-Performance Thin Layer Chromatography
Biosensors 2020, 10(11), 169; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10110169 - 08 Nov 2020
Viewed by 700
Abstract
The persistence of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) throughout wastewater treatment processes poses a significant health threat to humans and to the environment. The analysis of EDCs in wastewater remains a challenge for several reasons, including (a) the multitude of bioactive but partially unknown [...] Read more.
The persistence of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) throughout wastewater treatment processes poses a significant health threat to humans and to the environment. The analysis of EDCs in wastewater remains a challenge for several reasons, including (a) the multitude of bioactive but partially unknown compounds, (b) the complexity of the wastewater matrix, and (c) the required analytical sensitivity. By coupling biological assays with high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), different samples can be screened simultaneously, highlighting their active components; these may then be identified by chemical analysis. To allow the multiparallel detection of diverse endocrine disruption activities, we have constructed Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based bioreporter strains, responding to compounds with either estrogenic or androgenic activity, by the expression of green (EGFP), red (mRuby), or blue (mTagBFP2) fluorescent proteins. We demonstrate the analytical potential inherent in combining chromatographic compound separation with a direct fluorescent signal detection of EDC activities. The applicability of the system is further demonstrated by separating influent samples of wastewater treatment plants, and simultaneously quantifying estrogenic and androgenic activities of their components. The combination of a chemical separation technique with an optical yeast-based bioassay presents a potentially valuable addition to our arsenal of environmental pollution monitoring tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors: 10th Anniversary Feature Papers)
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Open AccessArticle
Detecting Vasodilation as Potential Diagnostic Biomarker in Breast Cancer Using Deep Learning-Driven Thermomics
Biosensors 2020, 10(11), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10110164 - 31 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 877
Abstract
Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Early diagnosis improves outcome and survival, which is the cornerstone of breast cancer treatment. Thermography has been utilized as a complementary diagnostic technique in breast cancer detection. Artificial intelligence (AI) has the capacity to [...] Read more.
Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Early diagnosis improves outcome and survival, which is the cornerstone of breast cancer treatment. Thermography has been utilized as a complementary diagnostic technique in breast cancer detection. Artificial intelligence (AI) has the capacity to capture and analyze the entire concealed information in thermography. In this study, we propose a method to potentially detect the immunohistochemical response to breast cancer by finding thermal heterogeneous patterns in the targeted area. In this study for breast cancer screening 208 subjects participated and normal and abnormal (diagnosed by mammography or clinical diagnosis) conditions were analyzed. High-dimensional deep thermomic features were extracted from the ResNet-50 pre-trained model from low-rank thermal matrix approximation using sparse principal component analysis. Then, a sparse deep autoencoder designed and trained for such data decreases the dimensionality to 16 latent space thermomic features. A random forest model was used to classify the participants. The proposed method preserves thermal heterogeneity, which leads to successful classification between normal and abnormal subjects with an accuracy of 78.16% (73.3–81.07%). By non-invasively capturing a thermal map of the entire tumor, the proposed method can assist in screening and diagnosing this malignancy. These thermal signatures may preoperatively stratify the patients for personalized treatment planning and potentially monitor the patients during treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors: 10th Anniversary Feature Papers)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Advances in the Detection of Dithiocarbamate Fungicides: Opportunities for Biosensors
Biosensors 2021, 11(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios11010012 - 30 Dec 2020
Viewed by 820
Abstract
Dithiocarbamate fungicides (DTFs) are widely used to control various fungal diseases in crops and ornamental plants. Maximum residual limits in the order of ppb-ppm are currently imposed by legislation to prevent toxicity problems associated with excessive use of DTFs. The specific analytical determination [...] Read more.
Dithiocarbamate fungicides (DTFs) are widely used to control various fungal diseases in crops and ornamental plants. Maximum residual limits in the order of ppb-ppm are currently imposed by legislation to prevent toxicity problems associated with excessive use of DTFs. The specific analytical determination of DTFs is complicated by their low solubility in water and organic solvents. This review summarizes the current analytical procedures used for the analysis of DTF, including chromatography, spectroscopy, and sensor-based methods and discusses the challenges related to selectivity, sensitivity, and sample preparation. Biosensors based on enzymatic inhibition demonstrated potential as analytical tools for DTFs and warrant further research, considering novel enzymes from extremophilic sources. Meanwhile, Raman spectroscopy and various sensors appear very promising, provided the selectivity issues are solved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors: 10th Anniversary Feature Papers)
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Open AccessReview
Biosensors for Antioxidants Detection: Trends and Perspectives
Biosensors 2020, 10(9), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10090112 - 01 Sep 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1057
Abstract
Herein we review the recent advances in biosensors for antioxidants detection underlying principles particularly emphasizing advantages along with limitations regarding the ability to discriminate between the specific antioxidant or total content. Recent advances in both direct detection of antioxidants, but also on indirect [...] Read more.
Herein we review the recent advances in biosensors for antioxidants detection underlying principles particularly emphasizing advantages along with limitations regarding the ability to discriminate between the specific antioxidant or total content. Recent advances in both direct detection of antioxidants, but also on indirect detection, measuring the induced damage on DNA-based biosensors are critically analysed. Additionally, latest developments on (bio)electronic tongues are also presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors: 10th Anniversary Feature Papers)
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