Special Issue "Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensors"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dag Roar Hjelme
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electronic Systems, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Gunnerus gate 1, 7012 Trondheim, Norway
Interests: optical fiber biosensor; optical fiber sensor; SPR; LSPR; silicon photonics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last few decades, we have seen an enormous growth in biosensors based on optical transducers. Among the reported optical biosensors, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors show a number of significant advantages over more conventional biosensors, including real-time sensing, label-free detection, fast response and ultra-high refractive index sensitivity. Consequently, SPR biosensors have been studied extensively since the first demonstration in 1982.

More recently, biosensors based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), a SPR phenomenon observed in metallic nanostructures rather than bulk metal, has emerged as a leading label-free biosensing technique. The progress has been fueled by continual improvement in fabrication of metal nanostructures. The properties of LSPR are highly dependent on the material and the size and shape of the nanostructures used. Thus, compared to SPR biosensors, LSPR biosensors are of more flexible design and often less complex sensor fabrication, arising from the fact that LSPR easier to excite, free from the need for prisms or other optical components.

Although surface plasmon resonance technologies are now widely used for biosensing, several challenges remain, e.g., improving sensitivity and limit of detection, improving selectivity in complex biological solutions, and adaptation of sensing elements for point-of-care diagnostics or other cost sensitive applications.

In this Special Issue, manuscripts are invited, which are devoted to the application of both SPR and LSPR for biosensors. Both reviews and original research articles will be published. Reviews should provide a critical overview of the current state-of-the-art in a particular application field. Original research papers that present new SPR/LSPR biosensor designs and applications and/or fundamental studies with potential relevance to biosensing are welcome.

Prof. Dag Roar Hjelme
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biosensor
  • Plasmonic
  • Plasmon resonance
  • Surface plasmon resonance
  • Localized surface plasmon resonance
  • Nanoplasmonics
  • Nanotechnology
  • Nanomaterial
  • Nanoparticle
  • Diagnostic
  • Pont-of-care diagnostics
  • Environmental monitoring
  • Refractive-index sensing
  • Multiplexed sensing
  • Optical fiber sensor

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Rapid Antibody Selection Using Surface Plasmon Resonance for High-Speed and Sensitive Hazelnut Lateral Flow Prototypes
Biosensors 2018, 8(4), 130; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8040130 - 14 Dec 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Lateral Flow Immunoassays (LFIAs) allow for rapid, low-cost, screening of many biomolecules such as food allergens. Despite being classified as rapid tests, many LFIAs take 10–20 min to complete. For a really high-speed LFIA, it is necessary to assess antibody association kinetics. By [...] Read more.
Lateral Flow Immunoassays (LFIAs) allow for rapid, low-cost, screening of many biomolecules such as food allergens. Despite being classified as rapid tests, many LFIAs take 10–20 min to complete. For a really high-speed LFIA, it is necessary to assess antibody association kinetics. By using a label-free optical technique such as Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), it is possible to screen crude monoclonal antibody (mAb) preparations for their association rates against a target. Herein, we describe an SPR-based method for screening and selecting crude anti-hazelnut antibodies based on their relative association rates, cross reactivity and sandwich pairing capabilities, for subsequent application in a rapid ligand binding assay. Thanks to the SPR selection process, only the fast mAb (F-50-6B12) and the slow (S-50-5H9) mAb needed purification for labelling with carbon nanoparticles to exploit high-speed LFIA prototypes. The kinetics observed in SPR were reflected in LFIA, with the test line appearing within 30 s, almost two times faster when F-50-6B12 was used, compared with S-50-5H9. Additionally, the LFIAs have demonstrated their future applicability to real life samples by detecting hazelnut in the sub-ppm range in a cookie matrix. Finally, these LFIAs not only provide a qualitative result when read visually, but also generate semi-quantitative data when exploiting freely downloadable smartphone apps. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensors)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Computational Study of Sensitivity Enhancement in Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) Biosensors by Using the Inclusion of the Core-Shell for Biomaterial Sample Detection
Biosensors 2018, 8(3), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8030075 - 07 Aug 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
A theoretical analysis and computational study of biomaterial sample detection with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) phenomenon spectroscopy are presented in this work with the objective of achieving more sensitive detection. In this paper, a Fe3O4@Au core-shell, a nanocomposite spherical [...] Read more.
A theoretical analysis and computational study of biomaterial sample detection with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) phenomenon spectroscopy are presented in this work with the objective of achieving more sensitive detection. In this paper, a Fe3O4@Au core-shell, a nanocomposite spherical nanoparticle consisting of a spherical Fe3O4 core covered by an Au shell, was used as an active material for biomaterial sample detection, such as for blood plasma, haemoglobin (Hb) cytoplasm and lecithin, with a wavelength of 632.8 nm. We present the detection amplification technique through an attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectrum in the Kretschmann configuration. The system consists of a four-layer material, i.e., prism/Ag/Fe3O4@Au + biomaterial sample/air. The effective permittivity determination of the core-shell nanoparticle (Fe3O4@Au) and the composite (Fe3O4@Au + biomaterial sample) was done by applying the effective medium theory approximation, and the calculation of the reflectivity was carried out by varying the size of the core-shell, volume fraction and biomaterial sample. In this model, the refractive index (RI) of the BK7 prism is 1.51; the RI of the Ag thin film is 0.13455 + 3.98651i with a thickness of 40 nm; and the RI of the composite is varied depending on the size of the nanoparticle core-shell and the RI of the biomaterial samples. Our results show that by varying the sizes of the core-shell, volume fraction and the RIs of the biomaterial samples, the dip in the reflectivity (ATR) spectrum is shifted to the larger angle of incident light, and the addition of a core-shell in the conventional SPR-based biosensor leads to the enhancement of the SPR biosensor sensitivity. For a core-shell with a radius a = 2.5 nm, the sensitivity increased by 10% for blood plasma detection, 47.72% for Hb cytoplasm detection and by 22.08% for lecithin detection compared to the sensitivity of the conventional SPR-based biosensor without core-shell addition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Recent Progress in Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensors (2016 to Mid-2018)
Biosensors 2018, 8(4), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8040132 - 16 Dec 2018
Cited by 10
Abstract
More than 50 papers on surface plasmon resonance biosensors, published between 2016 and mid-2018, are reviewed. Papers concerning the determination of large particles such as vesicles, exosomes, cancer cells, living cells, stem cells, and microRNA are excluded, as these are covered by a [...] Read more.
More than 50 papers on surface plasmon resonance biosensors, published between 2016 and mid-2018, are reviewed. Papers concerning the determination of large particles such as vesicles, exosomes, cancer cells, living cells, stem cells, and microRNA are excluded, as these are covered by a very recent review. The reviewed papers are categorized into five groups, depending on the degree of maturity of the reported solution; ranging from simple marker detection to clinical application of a previously developed biosensor. Instrumental solutions and details of biosensor construction are analyzed, including the chips, receptors, and linkers used, as well as calibration strategies. Biosensors with a sandwich structure containing different nanoparticles are considered separately, as are SPR (Surface Plasmon Resonance) applications for investigating the interactions of biomolecules. An analysis is also made of the markers determined using the biosensors. In conclusion, there is shown to be a growing number of SPR applications in the solution of real clinical problems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Chiral Plasmonic Biosensors
Biosensors 2018, 8(4), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8040120 - 01 Dec 2018
Cited by 7
Abstract
Biosensing requires fast, selective, and highly sensitive real-time detection of biomolecules using efficient simple-to-use techniques. Due to a unique capability to focus light at nanoscale, plasmonic nanostructures provide an excellent platform for label-free detection of molecular adsorption by sensing tiny changes in the [...] Read more.
Biosensing requires fast, selective, and highly sensitive real-time detection of biomolecules using efficient simple-to-use techniques. Due to a unique capability to focus light at nanoscale, plasmonic nanostructures provide an excellent platform for label-free detection of molecular adsorption by sensing tiny changes in the local refractive index or by enhancing the light-induced processes in adjacent biomolecules. This review discusses the opportunities provided by surface plasmon resonance in probing the chirality of biomolecules as well as their conformations and orientations. Various types of chiral plasmonic nanostructures and the most recent developments in the field of chiral plasmonics related to biosensing are considered. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Trends in SPR Cytometry: Advances in Label-Free Detection of Cell Parameters
Biosensors 2018, 8(4), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8040102 - 30 Oct 2018
Cited by 6
Abstract
SPR cytometry entails the measurement of parameters from intact cells using the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) phenomenon. Specific real-time and label-free binding of living cells to sensor surfaces has been made possible through the availability of SPR imaging (SPRi) instruments and researchers have [...] Read more.
SPR cytometry entails the measurement of parameters from intact cells using the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) phenomenon. Specific real-time and label-free binding of living cells to sensor surfaces has been made possible through the availability of SPR imaging (SPRi) instruments and researchers have started to explore its potential in the last decade. Here we will discuss the mechanisms of detection and additionally describe the problems and issues of mammalian cells in SPR biosensing, both from our own experience and with information from the literature. Finally, we build on the knowledge and applications that has already materialized in this field to give a forecast of some exciting applications for SPRi cytometry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop