Nanoparticles-Based Biosensors

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Nano- and Micro-Technologies in Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2021) | Viewed by 18529

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Professor of Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering, Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Head of Research and Innovation, University Mohamed VI Polytechnic, Lot 660 – Hay Moulay Rachid, 43150 Benguerir, Morocco
Interests: nanomaterials; biomaterials; supramolecular engineering; self-assembly; drug delivery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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MAScIR, Rabat Design Center, Rue Mohamed Al Jazouli – Madinat Al Irfane, Rabat 10 100, Maroc
Interests: digital devices; microelectronics; embedded systems; artificial intelligence; machine learning; hyperspectral imaging

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Guest Editor
1. Wenzhou Institute, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325001, China
2. School of Ophthalmology & Optometry, School of Biomedical Engineering, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035, China
Interests: nanomaterials science and engineering; nanoparticles; chemosensors; biomedical diagnostics; drug delivery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Organic, inorganic, and hybrid nanoparticles have been developed for a variety of applications ranging from nanomedicine to theranostics and renewable energy, among others. This Special Issue will focus on a particular field of applications of nanoparticles as sensors or components in a sensor device, system or strategy. 

This Special Issue aims to publish state-of-the-art original articles and comprehensive reviews covering nanoparticle-based sensors from the design, fabrication, chemistry, analysis, and/or applications perspectives. Although the emphasis is on practical applications, we also welcome fundamental studies. Some of the topics that will be covered include:

  • Chemosensors;
  • Biosensors;
  • Applications in volatiles or liquids sensing;
  • Devices sensing devices incorporating nanoparticles;
  • Pressure, temperature, humidity, light, conductance/resistivity, electrochemical, or radiation sensors;
  • Real-time sensing;
  • In vivo sensing and tracking;
  • Diagnostic imaging;
  • Nanoparticle-based immunochemical biosensors;
  • Fluorescent, luminescent, or SERS-active nanopartcile sensors;
  • Porous nanoparticles-based sensors;
  • Supramolecular nanoparticles-based sensors;
  • Nanostructured Polymer-based sensors;
  • Plasmonic nanoparticles-based sensors;
  • Carbon nanotubes-, gold-, or dendrimer-based sensors;
  • Field-effect transistor-based sensors.

Prof. Dr. Hicham Fenniri
Prof. Dr. Brahim Lakssir
Prof. Dr. Jianliang Shen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Chemosensors
  • Biosensors
  • Theranostics
  • Nanoparticles

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 2850 KiB  
Article
Maximizing the Surface Sensitivity of LSPR Biosensors through Plasmon Coupling—Interparticle Gap Optimization for Dimers Using Computational Simulations
by Attila Bonyár
Biosensors 2021, 11(12), 527; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios11120527 - 20 Dec 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3442 | Correction
Abstract
The bulk and surface refractive index sensitivities of LSPR biosensors, consisting of coupled plasmonic nanosphere and nano-ellipsoid dimers, were investigated by simulations using the boundary element method (BEM). The enhancement factor, defined as the ratio of plasmon extinction peak shift of multi-particle and [...] Read more.
The bulk and surface refractive index sensitivities of LSPR biosensors, consisting of coupled plasmonic nanosphere and nano-ellipsoid dimers, were investigated by simulations using the boundary element method (BEM). The enhancement factor, defined as the ratio of plasmon extinction peak shift of multi-particle and single-particle arrangements caused by changes in the refractive index of the environment, was used to quantify the effect of coupling on the increased sensitivity of the dimers. The bulk refractive index sensitivity (RIS) was obtained by changing the dielectric medium surrounding the nanoparticles, while the surface sensitivity was modeled by depositing dielectric layers on the nanoparticle in an increasing thickness. The results show that by optimizing the interparticle gaps for a given layer thickness, up to ~80% of the optical response range of the nanoparticles can be utilized by confining the plasmon field between the particles, which translates into an enhancement of ~3–4 times compared to uncoupled, single particles with the same shape and size. The results also show that in these cases, the surface sensitivity enhancement is significantly higher than the bulk RI sensitivity enhancement (e.g., 3.2 times vs. 1.8 times for nanospheres with a 70 nm diameter), and thus the sensors’ response for molecular interactions is higher than their RIS would indicate. These results underline the importance of plasmonic coupling in the optimization of nanoparticle arrangements for biosensor applications. The interparticle gap should be tailored with respect to the size of the used receptor/target molecules to maximize the molecular sensitivity, and the presented methodology can effectively aid the optimization of fabrication technologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticles-Based Biosensors)
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17 pages, 2865 KiB  
Article
One-Pot, In-Situ Synthesis of 8-Armed Poly(Ethylene Glycol)-Coated Ag Nanoclusters as a Fluorescent Sensor for Selective Detection of Cu2+
by Xiaoyuan Zhang, Guanghua Zhang, Gang Wei and Zhiqiang Su
Biosensors 2020, 10(10), 131; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10100131 - 23 Sep 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2753
Abstract
Fluorescent nanomaterials, such as quantum dots, have developed rapidly in recent years and have been significantly developed. Herein, we demonstrate a facile, one-pot, and in-situ synthesis strategy to obtain fluorescent silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) coated with eight-armed poly (ethylene glycol) polymers (8PEG-AgNCs) via a [...] Read more.
Fluorescent nanomaterials, such as quantum dots, have developed rapidly in recent years and have been significantly developed. Herein, we demonstrate a facile, one-pot, and in-situ synthesis strategy to obtain fluorescent silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) coated with eight-armed poly (ethylene glycol) polymers (8PEG-AgNCs) via a direct gel-mediated process. During the synthesis, ammonium (NH3) served as the crosslinker for the gel formation via a amine-type Michael addition reaction. This hydrogel can be used as a template to synthesize AgNCs using its volume-limiting effect. The in-situ generation of AgNCs takes place inside the nanocages of the formed gels, which guarantees the homogenous distribution of AgNCs in the gel matrix, as well as the efficient coating of PEG on the nanoclusters. After the degradation of gels, the released 8PEG-AgNCs nanohybrids showed strong blue fluorescence and exhibited long-term stability in aqueous solution for nearly one year. Results showed that the fabricated sensor revealed excellent fluorescent sensitivity for the selective detection of Cu2+ with a detection limit of 50 nM and a wide linear detection range of 5–100 μM. It is proposed that the greater cross-linking density leads to smaller gel pores and allows the synthesis of AgNCs with fluorescent properties. These results indicate that this novel hydrogel with certain biodegradation has the potential to be applied as a fluorescent sensor for catalytic synthesis, fluorescence tracing in cells, and fluorescence detection fields. Meanwhile, the novel design principle has a certain versatility to accelerate the development and application of other kinds of metal nanoclusters and quantum dots. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticles-Based Biosensors)
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Review

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17 pages, 4116 KiB  
Review
Molybdenum Disulfide-Based Nanoprobes: Preparation and Sensing Application
by Lingbo Gong, Lin Feng, Youwei Zheng, Yi Luo, Dan Zhu, Jie Chao, Shao Su and Lianhui Wang
Biosensors 2022, 12(2), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12020087 - 31 Jan 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 4033
Abstract
The use of nanoprobes in sensors is a popular way to amplify their analytical performance. Coupled with two-dimensional nanomaterials, nanoprobes have been widely used to construct fluorescence, electrochemical, electrochemiluminescence (ECL), colorimetric, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors for [...] Read more.
The use of nanoprobes in sensors is a popular way to amplify their analytical performance. Coupled with two-dimensional nanomaterials, nanoprobes have been widely used to construct fluorescence, electrochemical, electrochemiluminescence (ECL), colorimetric, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors for target molecules’ detection due to their extraordinary signal amplification effect. The MoS2 nanosheet is an emerging layered nanomaterial with excellent chemical and physical properties, which has been considered as an ideal supporting substrate to design nanoprobes for the construction of sensors. Herein, the development and application of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2)-based nanoprobes is reviewed. First, the preparation principle of MoS2-based nanoprobes was introduced. Second, the sensing application of MoS2-based nanoprobes was summarized. Finally, the prospect and challenge of MoS2-based nanoprobes in future were discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticles-Based Biosensors)
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19 pages, 6181 KiB  
Review
A Systematic Review of Food Allergy: Nanobiosensor and Food Allergen Detection
by Adriano Aquino and Carlos Adam Conte-Junior
Biosensors 2020, 10(12), 194; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10120194 - 29 Nov 2020
Cited by 35 | Viewed by 5959
Abstract
Several individuals will experience accidental exposure to an allergen. In this sense, the industry has invested in the processes of removing allergenic compounds in food. However, accidental exposure to allergenic proteins can result from allergenic substances not specified on labels. Analysis of allergenic [...] Read more.
Several individuals will experience accidental exposure to an allergen. In this sense, the industry has invested in the processes of removing allergenic compounds in food. However, accidental exposure to allergenic proteins can result from allergenic substances not specified on labels. Analysis of allergenic foods is involved in methods based on immunological, genetic, and mass spectrometry. The traditional methods have some limitations, such as high cost. In recent years, biosensor and nanoparticles combined have emerged as sensitive, selective, low-cost, and time-consuming techniques that can replace classic techniques. Nevertheless, each nanomaterial has shown a different potential to specific allergens or classes. This review used Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and the Meta-Analysis guidelines (PRISMA) to approach these issues. A total of 104 articles were retrieved from a standardized search on three databases (PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science). The systematic review article is organized by the category of allergen detection and nanoparticle detection. This review addresses the relevant biosensors and nanoparticles as gold, carbon, graphene, quantum dots to allergen protein detection. Among the selected articles it was possible to notice a greater potential application on the allergic proteins Ah, in peanuts and gold nanoparticle-base as a biosensor. We envision that in our review, the association between biosensor and nanoparticles has shown promise in the analysis of allergenic proteins present in different food samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticles-Based Biosensors)
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Other

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2 pages, 1008 KiB  
Correction
Correction: Bonyár, A. Maximizing the Surface Sensitivity of LSPR Biosensors through Plasmon Coupling—Interparticle Gap Optimization for Dimers Using Computational Simulations. Biosensors 2021, 11, 527
by Attila Bonyár
Biosensors 2022, 12(6), 411; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12060411 - 14 Jun 2022
Viewed by 1522
Abstract
In the original publication [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanoparticles-Based Biosensors)
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