Protein Kinases (PTKs) in Health and Diseases

A special issue of Biomolecules (ISSN 2218-273X). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021) | Viewed by 11217

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic
Interests: protein–protein interaction; 14-3-3 protein complexes; structural biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Through controlling the phosphorylation status of their targets, protein kinases and phosphatases play major roles in a myriad of cellular and extracellular processes such as transcription, cell cycle progression, differentiation, secretion, and apoptosis. Protein phosphorylation is also a key part of the protein–protein interactome as many protein–protein interactions are mediated by phosphorylated Tyr-, Ser- and Thr-based motifs. Therefore, tight and precise regulation of protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is critical for the survival of cells, and its dysregulation often leads to disease. For example, the kinases LRRK2, PKB/Akt, c-Abl, cdk5, and GSK-3b have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease; mTOR, Raf, BCR-Abl, MEK, p38 MAPK, EGFR, and many others have been shown to be involved in cancer; aberrant ASK1 kinase signaling participates in neurodegenerative disorders, inflammatory diseases, and cancer; and the activity of JAK kinases plays crucial roles in autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, a deep understanding of the kinase activity regulations under both healthy and diseased states is necessary for the development of successful therapeutic strategies.       

This Special Issue of Biomolecules titled “Protein Kinases (PTKs) in Health and Diseases” will present a collection of recent findings and review articles on the following topics:

  • Novel approaches in kinase inhibitor development;
  • Correlations between dysregulated protein kinases and diseases;
  • Regulation of protein kinase activity through protein–protein interactions.

Prof. Tomas Obsil
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomolecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • protein kinase
  • kinase inhibitor
  • protein–protein interaction
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • cancer
  • inflammation

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

34 pages, 2380 KiB  
Review
Impact of Conventional and Atypical MAPKs on the Development of Metabolic Diseases
by Toufic Kassouf and Grzegorz Sumara
Biomolecules 2020, 10(9), 1256; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom10091256 - 29 Aug 2020
Cited by 38 | Viewed by 6522
Abstract
The family of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) consists of fourteen members and has been implicated in regulation of virtually all cellular processes. MAPKs are divided into two groups, conventional and atypical MAPKs. Conventional MAPKs are further classified into four sub-families: extracellular signal-regulated kinases [...] Read more.
The family of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) consists of fourteen members and has been implicated in regulation of virtually all cellular processes. MAPKs are divided into two groups, conventional and atypical MAPKs. Conventional MAPKs are further classified into four sub-families: extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1, 2 and 3), p38 (α, β, γ, δ), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5). Four kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 3, 4, and 7 (ERK3, 4 and 7) as well as Nemo-like kinase (NLK) build a group of atypical MAPKs, which are activated by different upstream mechanisms than conventional MAPKs. Early studies identified JNK1/2 and ERK1/2 as well as p38α as a central mediators of inflammation-evoked insulin resistance. These kinases have been also implicated in the development of obesity and diabetes. Recently, other members of conventional MAPKs emerged as important mediators of liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and pancreatic β-cell metabolism. Moreover, latest studies indicate that atypical members of MAPK family play a central role in the regulation of adipose tissue function. In this review, we summarize early studies on conventional MAPKs as well as recent findings implicating previously ignored members of the MAPK family. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of drugs targeting specific members of the MAPK family. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein Kinases (PTKs) in Health and Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 1971 KiB  
Review
RKIP as an Inflammatory and Immune System Modulator: Implications in Cancer
by Maria Gabriela-Freitas, Joana Pinheiro, Ana Raquel-Cunha, Diana Cardoso-Carneiro and Olga Martinho
Biomolecules 2019, 9(12), 769; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom9120769 - 22 Nov 2019
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 4064
Abstract
Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP), an important modulator of intracellular signalling pathways, is commonly downregulated in multiple cancers. This reduction, or loss of expression, is correlated not only with the presence of metastasis, contributing to RKIP’s classification as a metastasis suppressor, but also [...] Read more.
Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP), an important modulator of intracellular signalling pathways, is commonly downregulated in multiple cancers. This reduction, or loss of expression, is correlated not only with the presence of metastasis, contributing to RKIP’s classification as a metastasis suppressor, but also with tumour aggressiveness and poor prognosis. Recent findings suggest a strong involvement of RKIP in the modulation of tumour microenvironment components, particularly by controlling the infiltration of specific immune cells and secretion of pro-metastatic factors. Additionally, RKIP interaction with multiple signalling molecules seems to potentiate its function as a regulator of inflammatory processes, mainly through stimulation of anti- or pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, RKIP is involved in the modulation of immunotherapeutic drugs response, through diverse mechanisms that sensitize cells to apoptosis. In the present review, we will provide updated information about the role of RKIP as an inflammatory and immune modulator and its potential implications in cancer will be addressed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein Kinases (PTKs) in Health and Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop