Dentistry and Cranio Facial District: The Role of Biomimetics

A special issue of Biomimetics (ISSN 2313-7673). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomimetics of Materials and Structures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 January 2024) | Viewed by 13797

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Multidisciplinary Department of Medical-Surgical and Dental Specialties, University of Campania, Luigi Vanvitelli, 80138 Naples, Italy
Interests: temporomandibular disorders; TED; temporomandibular joint; orofacial pain; dentistry; telemedicine; tele dentistry; implant; prosthesis; oral surgery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce a new Special Issue titled “Dentistry and Cranio Facial District: The role of Biomimetics”.

New technologies, such as digital devices, are available to enhance the effectiveness  of Diagnosis, and Treatment in dentistry and in  all the cranio facial district, in the field of biomimetic design, constructions, devices, and operations.

The applications of new biomaterials and techniques can lead to a significant advance in all of the main dental branches, such as restorative dentistry, prosthodontics, oral surgery, implantology, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, and temporomandibular disorder patients.

Authors conducting studies on these themes are welcome to submit original research articles, reviews, short communications, case series, and case reports.

Dr. Giuseppe Minervini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomimetics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomimetics
  • prothodontic
  • implants
  • oral surgery
  • plastic surgery
  • orthodontic
  • biomaterials
  • pediatric dentistry
  • temporomandibilar disorders
  • restaurative dentistry
  • bruxism
  • bone regeneration
  • scaffolds
  • technologies
  • digital
  • telemedicine

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

12 pages, 2175 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Prophylactic Effects between Localized Biomimetic Minocycline and Systematic Amoxicillin on Implants Placed Immediately in Infected Sockets
by Won-Woo Lee, Jin-Won Seo, Il-Seok Jang, Young-Joong Kwon, Won-Jun Joung, Jong-Hun Jun, Jiyeong Kim, Donghee Son, Seung-Weon Lim, Seo-Hyoung Yun, Marco Tallarico and Chang-Joo Park
Biomimetics 2023, 8(6), 461; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics8060461 - 1 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1095
Abstract
This study evaluated the prophylactic effect of localized biomimetic minocycline and systemic amoxicillin on immediate implant placement at infected extraction sites. Twelve mongrels with six implants each were randomly assigned to five groups: uninfected negative control (Group N); infected with oral complex bacteria [...] Read more.
This study evaluated the prophylactic effect of localized biomimetic minocycline and systemic amoxicillin on immediate implant placement at infected extraction sites. Twelve mongrels with six implants each were randomly assigned to five groups: uninfected negative control (Group N); infected with oral complex bacteria (Group P); infected and treated with amoxicillin one hour before implant placement (Group A); infected and treated with minocycline during implant placement (Group B); and infected and treated with amoxicillin one hour before implant placement and with minocycline during implant placement (Group C). Radiographic bone level, gingival index (GI), probing depth (PD), papillary bleeding index (PBI), and removal torque (RT) were recorded. There was no significant difference between Groups A, B, and C for bone loss. Group A showed the highest RT, the lowest PBI, and significantly lower GI and PD values than Group P. Group B exhibited significantly higher RT value than Group N and significantly smaller PD value than Group P at 6 w postoperatively. Localized minocycline could improve implant success by reducing bone loss and increasing RT and systemic amoxicillin could maintain the stability of the peri-implant soft tissue. However, combined use of these two antibiotics did not augment the prophylactic effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dentistry and Cranio Facial District: The Role of Biomimetics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 7460 KiB  
Article
Remineralization Induced by Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Toothpastes on Human Enamel
by Alexandra-Diana Florea, Lucian Cristian Pop, Horea-Rares-Ciprian Benea, Gheorghe Tomoaia, Csaba-Pal Racz, Aurora Mocanu, Cristina-Teodora Dobrota, Reka Balint, Olga Soritau and Maria Tomoaia-Cotisel
Biomimetics 2023, 8(6), 450; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics8060450 - 23 Sep 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1963
Abstract
This work aimed to compare the effect of four new toothpastes (P1–P4) based on pure and biomimetic substituted nano-hydroxyapatites (HAPs) on remineralization of human enamel. Artificially demineralized enamel slices were daily treated for ten days with different toothpastes according to the experimental design. [...] Read more.
This work aimed to compare the effect of four new toothpastes (P1–P4) based on pure and biomimetic substituted nano-hydroxyapatites (HAPs) on remineralization of human enamel. Artificially demineralized enamel slices were daily treated for ten days with different toothpastes according to the experimental design. Tooth enamel surfaces were investigated using atomic force microscope (AFM) images and surface roughness (Ra) determined before and after treatment. The surface roughness of enamel slices was statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni’s multiple comparison test. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) data revealed the HAP structure with crystal sizes between 28 and 33 nm and crystallinity between 29 and 37%. The average size of HAP particles was found to be between 30 and 40 nm. The Ra values indicated that P3 (HAP-Mg-Zn-Sr-Si) toothpaste was the most effective after 10 days of treatment, leading to the lowest mean roughness. The P3 and P2 (HAP) toothpastes were found to be effective in promoting remineralization. Specifically, their effectiveness can be ranked as follows: P3 = P2 > P4 (HAP-Mg-Zn-Si) > P1 (HAP-Zn), considering both the chemical composition and the size of their constitutive nanoparticles. The proposed toothpastes might be used successfully to treat early tooth decay. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dentistry and Cranio Facial District: The Role of Biomimetics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 4445 KiB  
Article
Different Methods for Assessing Tooth Colour—In Vitro Study
by Susana Dias, Joana Dias, Ruben Pereira, João Silveira, António Mata and Duarte Marques
Biomimetics 2023, 8(5), 384; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics8050384 - 23 Aug 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2045
Abstract
Colour assessment using digital methods can yield varying results, and it is important for clinicians to recognize the potential variability intra and inter-device. This study aimed to compare the L*a*b* values of VITA Classical (VC) and VITA Toothguide 3D-MASTER (VM) guides using two [...] Read more.
Colour assessment using digital methods can yield varying results, and it is important for clinicians to recognize the potential variability intra and inter-device. This study aimed to compare the L*a*b* values of VITA Classical (VC) and VITA Toothguide 3D-MASTER (VM) guides using two methods, SpectroShade (SS) and eLAB. Thirty-four measurements per tab were performed by a single operator across three batches of each guide. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) between batches were calculated. Values <0.5, 0.5–0.75, 0.75–0.9, and >0.90 were classified as poor, moderate, good, and excellent reliability, respectively. Results were reported as mean and standard deviation of the L*a*b* values and respective colour differences (ΔE00) for each tab and method. Statistical analyses were performed with an independent t-test, α = 0.05. ICC values between batches were excellent for all L*a*b*, except for a* component in eLAB. There were statistically significant differences between methods in most L*a*b* values. The intra-device mean ΔE00 was 0.5 ± 0.6 for VC, 0.5 ± 0.8 for VM in SS, 1.1 ± 0.8 for VC, 1.1 ± 0.9 for VM in eLAB. The mean ΔE00 inter-device was 4.9 ± 1.7 for VC, 5.0 ± 1.7 for VM. Both methods demonstrated good internal consistency, with high ICC values and low intra-device colour differences, but exhibited high variability between methods, higher for a* the component. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dentistry and Cranio Facial District: The Role of Biomimetics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 3777 KiB  
Article
Chitosan Nanoparticle/Simvastatin for Experimental Maxillary Bony Defect Healing: A Histological and Histomorphometrical Study
by Muna Alaa Alsaeed and Nada M.H. Al-Ghaban
Biomimetics 2023, 8(4), 363; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics8040363 - 14 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1602
Abstract
Biomaterials such as chitosan and simvastatin (Sim) have been introduced to accelerate the extensive and multicellular biological process of bone healing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone healing potential of chitosan and Sim, alone or combined. Forty-two male New [...] Read more.
Biomaterials such as chitosan and simvastatin (Sim) have been introduced to accelerate the extensive and multicellular biological process of bone healing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone healing potential of chitosan and Sim, alone or combined. Forty-two male New Zealand rabbits were divided into three groups: chitosan nanoparticles (ChN), Sim and chitosan simvastatin nanoparticles (ChSimN). Two bony defects were created in the maxillary bone. The hole on the right side received one of the experimental materials, while the other side was assigned as the control and left to heal without any intervention. Bone specimens were collected at 2 and 4 weeks and then taken for histological and histomorphometrical analyses. The histological findings revealed that ChN possessed the highest number of osteoblasts and osteoclasts at weeks 2 and osteocytes after 4 weeks. There was a significant difference between the two healing periods regarding all bone parameters across all groups. ChN stood out as the only group that had a significant difference in the count of all bone cells between the two periods, thus having the best potential in promoting bone healing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dentistry and Cranio Facial District: The Role of Biomimetics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 3823 KiB  
Article
Utilizing an Oxidized Biopolymer to Enhance the Bonding of Glass Ionomer Luting Cement Particles for Improved Physical and Mechanical Properties
by Hanan Alsunbul, Aftab Ahmed Khan, Merry Angelyn Tan De Vera, Leonel S. J. Bautista and Ravish Javed
Biomimetics 2023, 8(4), 347; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics8040347 - 5 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1208
Abstract
This study aimed to determine the reinforcing effect of two weight ratios of Gum Arabic (GA) natural biopolymer, i.e., 0.5% and 1.0% in the powdered composition of glass ionomer luting cement. GA powder was oxidized and GA-reinforced GIC in 0.5 and 1.0 wt.% [...] Read more.
This study aimed to determine the reinforcing effect of two weight ratios of Gum Arabic (GA) natural biopolymer, i.e., 0.5% and 1.0% in the powdered composition of glass ionomer luting cement. GA powder was oxidized and GA-reinforced GIC in 0.5 and 1.0 wt.% formulations were prepared in rectangular bars using two commercially available GIC luting materials (Medicem and Ketac Cem Radiopaque). The control groups of both materials were prepared as such. The effect of reinforcement was evaluated in terms of microhardness, flexural strength (FS), fracture toughness (FT), and tensile strength (TS). The internal porosity and water contact angle formation on the study samples were also evaluated. Film thickness was measured to gauge the effect of micron-sized GA powder in GA–GIC composite. Paired sample t-tests were conducted to analyze data for statistical significance (p < 0.05). The experimental groups of both materials containing 0.5 wt.% GA–GIC significantly improved FS, FT, and TS compared to their respective control groups. However, the microhardness significantly decreased in experimental groups of both cements compared to their respective control groups. The addition of GA powder did not cause a significant increase in film thickness and the water contact angle of both 0.5 and 1.0 wt.% GA–GIC formulations were less than 90o. Interestingly, the internal porosity of 0.5 wt.% GA–GIC formulations in both materials were observed less compared to their respective control groups. The significantly higher mechanical properties and low porosity in 0.5 wt.% GA–GIC formulations compared to their respective control group indicate that reinforcing GA powder with 0.5 wt.% in GIC might be promising in enhancing the mechanical properties of GIC luting materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dentistry and Cranio Facial District: The Role of Biomimetics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

25 pages, 3686 KiB  
Review
Recent Advances in Scaffolds for Guided Bone Regeneration
by Theodoros-Filippos Valamvanos, Xanthippi Dereka, Hector Katifelis, Maria Gazouli and Nefeli Lagopati
Biomimetics 2024, 9(3), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics9030153 - 1 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1798
Abstract
The rehabilitation of alveolar bone defects of moderate to severe size is often challenging. Currently, the therapeutic approaches used include, among others, the guided bone regeneration technique combined with various bone grafts. Although these techniques are widely applied, several limitations and complications have [...] Read more.
The rehabilitation of alveolar bone defects of moderate to severe size is often challenging. Currently, the therapeutic approaches used include, among others, the guided bone regeneration technique combined with various bone grafts. Although these techniques are widely applied, several limitations and complications have been reported such as morbidity, suboptimal graft/membrane resorption rate, low structural integrity, and dimensional stability. Thus, the development of biomimetic scaffolds with tailor-made characteristics that can modulate cell and tissue interaction may be a promising tool. This article presents a critical consideration in scaffold’s design and development while also providing information on various fabrication methods of these nanosystems. Their utilization as delivery systems will also be mentioned. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dentistry and Cranio Facial District: The Role of Biomimetics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 5389 KiB  
Review
Customized Subperiosteal Implants for the Rehabilitation of Atrophic Jaws: A Consensus Report and Literature Review
by Javier Herce-López, Mariano del Canto Pingarrón, Álvaro Tofé-Povedano, Laura García-Arana, Marc Espino-Segura-Illa, Ramón Sieira-Gil, Carlos Rodado-Alonso, Alba Sánchez-Torres and Rui Figueiredo
Biomimetics 2024, 9(1), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics9010061 - 22 Jan 2024
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2936
Abstract
(1) Background: The aim was to perform a literature review on customized subperiosteal implants (CSIs) and provide clinical guidelines based on the results of an expert consensus meeting held in 2023. (2) Methods: A literature search was performed in Pubmed (MEDLINE) in July [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The aim was to perform a literature review on customized subperiosteal implants (CSIs) and provide clinical guidelines based on the results of an expert consensus meeting held in 2023. (2) Methods: A literature search was performed in Pubmed (MEDLINE) in July 2023, including case series and cohort studies with a minimum follow-up of 6 months that analyzed totally or partially edentulous patients treated with CSIs. Previously, an expert consensus meeting had been held in May 2023 to establish the most relevant clinical guidelines. (3) Results: Six papers (four case series and two retrospective cohort studies) were finally included in the review. Biological and mechanical complication rates ranged from 5.7% to 43.8% and from 6.3% to 20%, respectively. Thorough digital planning to ensure the passive fit of the CSI is mandatory to avoid implant failure. (4) Conclusions: CSIs are a promising treatment option for rehabilitating edentulous patients with atrophic jaws; they seem to have an excellent short-term survival rate, a low incidence of major complications, and less morbidity in comparison with complex bone grafting procedures. As the available data on the use of CSIs are very scarce, it is not possible to establish clinical recommendations based on scientific evidence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dentistry and Cranio Facial District: The Role of Biomimetics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop