Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms of Longevity and Aging, Volume II

A special issue of Biology (ISSN 2079-7737).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 2100

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
European Research Institute for The Biology of Ageing (ERIBA), University of Groningen (RUG), 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands
Interests: aging; cellular senescence; cancer; extracellular vesicles
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Guest Editor
1. European Research Institute for The Biology of Ageing (ERIBA), University of Groningen (RUG), 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands
2. Health Research Institute of Santiago (IDIS), Clinical University Hospital (CHUS), Travesía da Choupana, E15706 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Interests: cellular senescence; cancer; aging; drug discovery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is part of a series with, “Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms of Longevity and Aging----Volume I”.

Aging is an inevitable outcome of life, and healthy aging can be preserved through various interventions.

We are assisting in increasing the life expectancy of the population, in parallel to a rise in research studies on biological and molecular factors implicated in age-related pathologies.

Accumulating evidence links aging to genetic and epigenetic alterations, and studies already suggest that the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, inflammation, oxidative stress response, DNA repair, nutritional intervention, and cellular senescence are crucial players.

This Special Issue aims to provide an overview of and update on the analysis of the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of human aging and longevity to establish links between common gene pathways and hallmark genetic and epigenetic signatures that can be used to identify “druggable” targets to counter age-related disease and promote longevity.

We invite submissions of reviews, research articles, and short manuscripts related to genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in organismal aging and longevity, including the characterization of longevity-related genes, analysis of gene expression profiles, and novel insights into the regulation of gene expression and gene pathways with the potential to develop novel therapeutic and rejuvenation approaches for prevention, treatment, diagnosis, and prognosis in age-related diseases or to promote longevity.

Dr. Michela Borghesan
Dr. Pilar Picallos-Rabina
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • genetics of aging
  • cellular aging
  • gene regulation
  • genetic mechanisms of longevity
  • gene expression
  • genetic modulation
  • healthy aging
  • age-related pathologies
  • genetics of longevity
  • epigenetic of longevity
  • epigenetic of aging

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

17 pages, 774 KiB  
Review
Age-Associated Changes of Sirtuin 2 Expression in CNS and the Periphery
by Maider Garmendia-Berges, Noemi Sola-Sevilla, MCarmen Mera-Delgado and Elena Puerta
Biology 2023, 12(12), 1476; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology12121476 - 29 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2), one of the seven members of the sirtuin family, has emerged as a potential regulator of aging and age-related pathologies since several studies have demonstrated that it shows age-related changes in humans and different animal models. A detailed analysis of [...] Read more.
Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2), one of the seven members of the sirtuin family, has emerged as a potential regulator of aging and age-related pathologies since several studies have demonstrated that it shows age-related changes in humans and different animal models. A detailed analysis of the relevant works published to date addressing this topic shows that the changes that occur in SIRT2 with aging seem to be opposite in the brain and in the periphery. On the one hand, aging induces an increase in SIRT2 levels in the brain, which supports the notion that its pharmacological inhibition is beneficial in different neurodegenerative diseases. However, on the other hand, in the periphery, SIRT2 levels are reduced with aging while keeping its expression is protective against age-related peripheral inflammation, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular diseases. Thus, systemic administration of any known modulator of this enzyme would have conflicting outcomes. This review summarizes the currently available information on changes in SIRT2 expression in aging and the underlying mechanisms affected, with the aim of providing evidence to determine whether its pharmacological modulation could be an effective and safe pharmacological strategy for the treatment of age-related diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms of Longevity and Aging, Volume II)
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