Materials in Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery and Regenerative Medicine

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2024) | Viewed by 5554

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Graduate School of Clinical Dentistry, Hallym University, Chuncheon, South Korea; College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Republic of Korea
Interests: oral and maxillofacial surgery; tissues and regenerative medicine; dental implants; dental materials; orthognathic surgery

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Guest Editor
Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Dentistry, Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hwaseong, Republic of Korea
Interests: oral and maxillofacial surgery; orthognathic surgery; dental implants; magnesium alloys; temporomandibular disorder

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The proposed Special Issue titled "Materials in Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery and Regenerative Medicine" aims to explore the various materials used in the field of dental and maxillofacial surgery, as well as their applications in regenerative medicine. The articles or research will focus on the properties and characteristics of different materials, including biocompatibility, biodegradability, bioengineering, and mechanical strength, and how they can be used in various applications such as dental implants, bone grafts, fixation materials, and tissue engineering. Additionally, the research will investigate the potential of new and emerging materials, such as those based on nanotechnology and biotechnology, for use in dental and maxillofacial surgery and regenerative medicine. The research will also evaluate the clinical outcomes and effectiveness of these materials in real-world settings. Overall, the issue aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the materials used in dental and maxillofacial surgery and regenerative medicine, and their potential to improve patient outcomes in the future.

Dr. Byoung-Eun Yang
Dr. Sung-Woon On
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • maxillofacial
  • dental implant
  • tissue engineering
  • biomechanics
  • bone or soft tissue regeneration
  • orthognathic
  • patient-specific implants
  • bespoke medicine
  • temporomandibular joint
  • magnesium alloys

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

9 pages, 5297 KiB  
Article
Single versus Double Plate Fixation in Condylar Neck Fractures: Clinical Results and Biomechanics Simulation
by Chien-Chung Chen, Ting-Han Chiu, Cheng-Yu Yan, Ya-Pei Hou and Ting-Sheng Lin
Bioengineering 2024, 11(7), 704; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11070704 - 11 Jul 2024
Viewed by 151
Abstract
The open reduction of mandibular condyle neck fractures is difficult due to the limited surgical field and complex facial nerve structures. The most effective fixation method for narrow fractured segments is debated as standard double four-hole plate fixation is often not feasible. This [...] Read more.
The open reduction of mandibular condyle neck fractures is difficult due to the limited surgical field and complex facial nerve structures. The most effective fixation method for narrow fractured segments is debated as standard double four-hole plate fixation is often not feasible. This research compared bone stability and force resistance between single-long-plate and double-short-plate fixations using clinical outcomes, a Sawbones mandible model, and finite element analysis. In patients with condyle neck fractures, nine were fixed with single-long-plate and twelve with double-short-plate fixations, with no significant differences in malocclusion and facial palsy rates. In compression tests with a Sawbones model, displacements in the posterior part were similar in both fixation groups. In contrast, the anterior part had significantly higher displacements in the single-long-plate group. Finite element analysis showed higher displacements in both anterior and posterior parts in the single-plate group compared to the double-short-plate group. Maximum stresses were at the second screw hole in single-long-plate fixation and the turning point of the upper plate at the condyle neck in double-short-plate fixation. Double-short-plate fixations demonstrated better stability and force resistance than single-long-plate fixations. Full article
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20 pages, 4923 KiB  
Article
Healing of Extraction Sites after Alveolar Ridge Preservation Using Advanced Platelet-Rich Fibrin: A Retrospective Study
by Antonia Samia Khaddour, Răzvan Eugen Ghiță, Mihaela Ionescu, Radu Gabriel Rîcă, Veronica Mercuț, Horia Octavian Manolea, Adrian Camen, Emma Cristina Drăghici, Andrei Radu and Sanda Mihaela Popescu
Bioengineering 2024, 11(6), 566; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering11060566 - 3 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Background: Over time, numerous surgical procedures and biomaterials have been proposed for the reconstruction of post-extraction bone defects, each with their advantages and disadvantages. The main objective of this study was to evaluate dimensional changes in the alveolar bone 3 months after tooth [...] Read more.
Background: Over time, numerous surgical procedures and biomaterials have been proposed for the reconstruction of post-extraction bone defects, each with their advantages and disadvantages. The main objective of this study was to evaluate dimensional changes in the alveolar bone 3 months after tooth extraction, before implant planning, comparing alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) with spontaneous healing. Methods: A total of 84 patients with non-restorable molars were included in the study. Forty-two patients received ARP with advanced platelet-rich fibrin (A-PRF) and spontaneous healing was evaluated in these patients. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) analysis performed before and after surgical intervention was used to determine the changes in vertical and horizontal bone dimensions produced after tooth extraction. Results: CBCT measurements showed reduction in both vertical and horizontal alveolar bone size in both groups. For the study group, the alveolar parameters (height, width) were higher compared to the control group. The percentage variations between dimensional differences from the two groups were 38.58% for height, and for width were 36.88% at 0 mm, 35.56% at 3 mm, 36.61% at 5 mm, and 38.73% at 7 mm. The differences were statistically significant (p ˂ 0.0005). Conclusions: The results obtained after ARP with A-PRF showed a reduced loss of bone volume compared to spontaneous healing. Full article
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13 pages, 13203 KiB  
Article
Zirconia Dental Implants: A Closer Look at Surface Condition and Intrinsic Composition by SEM-EDX
by Alex Tchinda, Augustin Lerebours, Richard Kouitat-Njiwa and Pierre Bravetti
Bioengineering 2023, 10(9), 1102; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10091102 - 20 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1413
Abstract
Modern dental implantology is based on a set of more or less related first-order parameters, such as the implant surface and the intrinsic composition of the material. For decades, implant manufacturers have focused on the research and development of the ideal material combined [...] Read more.
Modern dental implantology is based on a set of more or less related first-order parameters, such as the implant surface and the intrinsic composition of the material. For decades, implant manufacturers have focused on the research and development of the ideal material combined with an optimal surface finish to ensure the success and durability of their product. However, brands do not always communicate transparently about the nature of the products they market. Thus, this study aims to compare the surface finishes and intrinsic composition of three zirconia implants from three major brands. To do so, cross-sections of the apical part of the implants to be analyzed were made with a micro-cutting machine. Samples of each implant of a 4 to 6 mm thickness were obtained. Each was analyzed by a tactile profilometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Compositional measurements were performed by X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The findings revealed a significant use of aluminum as a chemical substitute by manufacturers. In addition, some manufacturers do not mention the presence of this element in their implants. However, by addressing these issues and striving to improve transparency and safety standards, manufacturers have the opportunity to provide even more reliable products to patients. Full article
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22 pages, 8125 KiB  
Article
Clinical Stability of Bespoke Snowman Plates for Fixation following Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy of the Mandible
by Soo-Hwan Byun, Sang-Yoon Park, Sang-Min Yi, In-Young Park, Sung-Woon On, Chun-Ki Jeong, Jong-Cheol Kim and Byoung-Eun Yang
Bioengineering 2023, 10(8), 914; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10080914 - 1 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1628
Abstract
Maxillofacial skeletal surgery often involves the use of patient-specific implants. However, errors in obtaining patient data and designing and manufacturing patient-specific plates and guides can occur even with accurate virtual surgery. To address these errors, bespoke Snowman plates were designed to allow movement [...] Read more.
Maxillofacial skeletal surgery often involves the use of patient-specific implants. However, errors in obtaining patient data and designing and manufacturing patient-specific plates and guides can occur even with accurate virtual surgery. To address these errors, bespoke Snowman plates were designed to allow movement of the mandible. This study aimed to compare the stability of bespoke four-hole miniplates with that of a bespoke Snowman plate for bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO), and to present a method to investigate joint cavity changes, as well as superimpose virtual and actual surgical images of the mandible. This retrospective study included 22 patients who met the inclusion criteria and underwent orthognathic surgery at a university hospital between 2015 and 2018. Two groups were formed on the basis of the plates used: a control group with four-hole bespoke plates and a study group with bespoke Snowman plates. Stability was assessed by measuring the condyle–fossa space and superimposing three-dimensional virtual surgery images on postoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. No significant differences were observed in the condyle–fossa space preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively between the control and study groups. Superimposing virtual surgery and CBCT scans revealed minimal differences in the landmark points, with no variation between groups or timepoints. The use of bespoke Snowman plates for stabilizing the mandible following SSRO exhibited clinical stability and reliability similar to those with bespoke four-hole plates. Additionally, a novel method was introduced to evaluate skeletal stability by separately analyzing the condyle–fossa gap changes and assessing the mandibular position. Full article
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13 pages, 5810 KiB  
Article
Allogenic Stem Cells Carried by Porous Silicon Scaffolds for Active Bone Regeneration In Vivo
by Matthieu Renaud, Philippe Bousquet, Gerard Macias, Gael Y. Rochefort, Jean-Olivier Durand, Lluis F. Marsal, Frédéric Cuisinier, Frédérique Cunin and Pierre-Yves Collart-Dutilleul
Bioengineering 2023, 10(7), 852; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10070852 - 19 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1324
Abstract
To date, bone regeneration techniques use many biomaterials for bone grafting with limited efficiencies. For this purpose, tissue engineering combining biomaterials and stem cells is an important avenue of development to improve bone regeneration. Among potentially usable non-toxic and bioresorbable scaffolds, porous silicon [...] Read more.
To date, bone regeneration techniques use many biomaterials for bone grafting with limited efficiencies. For this purpose, tissue engineering combining biomaterials and stem cells is an important avenue of development to improve bone regeneration. Among potentially usable non-toxic and bioresorbable scaffolds, porous silicon (pSi) is an interesting biomaterial for bone engineering. The possibility of modifying its surface can allow a better cellular adhesion as well as a control of its rate of resorption. Moreover, release of silicic acid upon resorption of its nanostructure has been previously proved to enhance stem cell osteodifferentiation by inducing calcium phosphate formation. In the present study, we used a rat tail model to experiment bone tissue engineering with a critical size defect. Two groups with five rats per group of male Wistar rats were used. In each rat, four vertebrae were used for biomaterial implantation. Randomized bone defects were filled with pSi particles alone or pSi particles carrying dental pulp stem cells (DPSC). Regeneration was evaluated in comparison to empty defect and defects filled with xenogenic bone substitute (Bio-Oss®). Fluorescence microscopy and SEM evaluations showed adhesion of DPSCs on pSi particles with cells exhibiting distribution throughout the biomaterial. Histological analyzes revealed the formation of a collagen network when the defects were filled with pSi, unlike the positive control using Bio-Oss®. Overall bone formation was objectivated with µCT analysis and showed a higher bone mineral density with pSi particles combining DPSC. Immunohistochemical assays confirmed the increased expression of bone markers (osteocalcin) when pSi particles carried DPSC. Surprisingly, no grafted cells remained in the regenerated area after one month of healing, even though the grafting of DPSC clearly increased bone regeneration for both bone marker expression and overall bone formation objectivated with µCT. In conclusion, our results show that the association of pSi with DPSCs in vivo leads to greater bone formation, compared to a pSi graft without DPSCs. Our results highlight the paracrine role of grafted stem cells by recruitment and stimulation of endogenous cells. Full article
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