Special Issue "Plant Adaptation to Global Climate Change"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Biometeorology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 21 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Amit Kumar Mishra
Website
Guest Editor
Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, Texas A&M University, TX 78801, USA
Interests: air pollution; climate change; ozone; carbon dioxide; plant stress physiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plants vary in their response to the changing environment. This has a high impact on agriculture, especially because of the need to produce more food for the rapidly growing population, using suboptimal growth conditions because of lesser availability of resources like water on one hand, and global warming on the other hand. Crop production is susceptible to climate variability, and climate change related with high temperature, elevated CO2, varying patterns of rainfall, and other environmental factors are having an adverse impact on global crop production and food security. The influence of climate change on plants may be from cellular to the molecular level. Subsequently, the existing literature on the plant’s response to different environmental stresses is diverse. In view of the future impacts of climate change, understanding the response of plants becomes critical in developing strategies to cope with the threats to plant growth and development.

This Special Issue will focus in particular on the current research of effects of air pollutants, UV-B, salinity, heat/freeze, drought, and other environmental factors on plants. We encourage the submission of the manuscripts that include plant–environment interaction and particularly welcome those studies that aim to integrate morphological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular approaches of plant response to climate change.

Dr. Amit Kumar Mishra
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Air Pollution
  • Plant–environment interaction
  • Environmental stress
  • UV-B and plant response
  • Abiotic stress and plant response
  • Light sensing and mechanism

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Historical Radial Growth of Chinese Torreya Trees and Adaptation to Climate Change
Atmosphere 2020, 11(7), 691; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11070691 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
Chinese Torreya is a vital crop tree with an average life span of a thousand years in subtropical China. Plantations of this tree are broadly under construction, to benefit the local economy. Information on the growth and adaptation to climate change for this [...] Read more.
Chinese Torreya is a vital crop tree with an average life span of a thousand years in subtropical China. Plantations of this tree are broadly under construction, to benefit the local economy. Information on the growth and adaptation to climate change for this species is limited, but tree rings might show responses to historical climate dynamics. In this study, six stem sections from Chinese Torreya trees between 60 and 90 years old were acquired and analyzed with local climate data. The results indicated that the accumulated radial growth increased linearly with time, even at the age of 90 years, and the average radial increment of each tree ranged from 1.9 to 5.1 mm/year. The variances of basal area increment (BAI) increased with time, and correlated with the variances of precipitation in the growing seasons. Taylor’s power law was present in the radial growth, with the scaling exponents concentrated within 1.9–2.1. A “Triangle”-shaped relationship was found between the precipitation in the growing seasons and annual radial increments. Similar patterns also appeared for the standard precipitation index, maximum monthly air temperature and minimum monthly air temperature. The annual increases were highly correlated with the local climate. Slow growth, resilience to drought and multiple stems in one tree might help the tree species adapt to different climate conditions, with the implications for plantation management discussed in this paper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Adaptation to Global Climate Change)
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Open AccessArticle
Simulation of Climate Change Impacts on Phenology and Production of Winter Wheat in Northwestern China Using CERES-Wheat Model
Atmosphere 2020, 11(7), 681; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11070681 - 28 Jun 2020
Abstract
Wheat plays a very important role in China’s agriculture. The wheat grain yields are affected by the growing period that is determined by temperature, precipitation, and field management, such as planting date and cultivar species. Here, we used the CSM-CERES-Wheat model along with [...] Read more.
Wheat plays a very important role in China’s agriculture. The wheat grain yields are affected by the growing period that is determined by temperature, precipitation, and field management, such as planting date and cultivar species. Here, we used the CSM-CERES-Wheat model along with different Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and two global circulation models (GCMs) to simulate different impacts on the winter wheat that caused by changing climate for 2025 and 2050 projections for Guanzhong Plain in Northwest China. Our results showed that it is obvious that there is a warming trend in Guanzhong Plain; the mean temperature for the different scenarios increased up to 3.8 °C. Furthermore, the precipitation varied in the year; in general, the rainfall in February and August was increased, while it decreased in April, October and November. However, the solar radiation was found to be greatly reduced in the Guanzhong Plain. Compared to the reference year, the results showed that the number of days to maturity was shortened 3–24 days, and the main reason was the increased temperature during the winter wheat growing period. Moreover, five planting dates (from October 7 to 27 with five days per step) were applied to simulate the final yield and to select an appropriate planting date for the study area. The yield changed smallest based on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL)-CM3 (−6.5, −5.3, −4.2 based on RCP 4.5, RCP 6.0, and RCP 8.5) for 2025 when planting on October 27. Farmers might have to plant the crop before 27 October. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Adaptation to Global Climate Change)
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Open AccessArticle
Transcriptomics of Mature Rice (Oryza Sativa L. Koshihikari) Seed under Hot Conditions by DNA Microarray Analyses
Atmosphere 2020, 11(5), 528; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11050528 - 20 May 2020
Abstract
Higher temperature conditions during the final stages of rice seed development (seed filling and maturation) are known to cause damage to both rice yield and rice kernel quality. The western and central parts of Japan especially have seen record high temperatures during the [...] Read more.
Higher temperature conditions during the final stages of rice seed development (seed filling and maturation) are known to cause damage to both rice yield and rice kernel quality. The western and central parts of Japan especially have seen record high temperatures during the past decade, resulting in the decrease of rice kernel quality. In this study, we looked at the rice harvested from a town in the central Kanto-plains (Japan) in 2010. The daytime temperatures were above the critical limits ranging from 34 to 38 °C at the final stages of seed development and maturity allowing us to investigate high-temperature effects in the actual field condition. Three sets of dry mature rice seeds (commercial), each with specific quality standards, were obtained from Japan Agriculture (JA Zen-Noh) branch in Ami-town of Ibaraki Prefecture in September 2010: grade 1 (top quality, labeled as Y1), grade 2 (medium quality, labeled as Y2), and grade 3 (out-of-grade or low quality, labeled as Y3). The research objective was to examine particular alterations in genome-wide gene expression in grade 2 (Y2) and grade 3 (Y3) seeds compared to grade 1 (Y1). We followed the high-temperature spike using a high-throughput omics-approach DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K rice oligo DNA chip) in conjunction with MapMan bioinformatics analysis. As expected, rice seed quality analysis revealed low quality in Y3 > Y2 over Y1 in taste, amylose, protein, and fatty acid degree, but not in water content. Differentially expressed gene (DEG) analysis from the transcriptomic profiling data revealed that there are more than one hundred upregulated (124 and 373) and downregulated (106 and 129) genes in Y2 (grade 2 rice seed) and Y3 (grade 3 rice seed), respectively. Bioinformatic analysis of DEGs selected as highly regulated differentially expressed (HRDE) genes revealed changes in function of genes related to metabolism, defense/stress response, fatty acid biosynthesis, and hormones. This research provides, for the first time, the seed transcriptome profile for the classified low grades (grade 2, and out-of-grade; i.e., grade 3) of rice under high-temperature stress condition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Adaptation to Global Climate Change)
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Open AccessArticle
Climate Change Impacts on Sugarcane Production in Thailand
Atmosphere 2020, 11(4), 408; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11040408 - 19 Apr 2020
Abstract
This study investigated the impact of climate change on yield, harvested area, and production of sugarcane in Thailand using spatial regression together with an instrumental variable approach to address the possible selection bias. The data were comprised of new fine-scale weather outcomes merged [...] Read more.
This study investigated the impact of climate change on yield, harvested area, and production of sugarcane in Thailand using spatial regression together with an instrumental variable approach to address the possible selection bias. The data were comprised of new fine-scale weather outcomes merged together with a provincial-level panel of crops that spanned all provinces in Thailand from 1989–2016. We found that in general climate variables, both mean and variability, statistically determined the yield and harvested area of sugarcane. Increased population density reduced the harvested area for non-agricultural use. Considering simultaneous changes in climate and demand of land for non-agricultural development, we reveal that the future sugarcane yield, harvested area, and production are projected to decrease by 23.95–33.26%, 1.29–2.49%, and 24.94–34.93% during 2046–2055 from the baseline, respectively. Sugarcane production is projected to have the largest drop in the eastern and lower section of the central regions. Given the role of Thailand as a global exporter of sugar and the importance of sugarcane production in Thai agriculture, the projected declines in the production could adversely affect the well-being of one million sugarcane growers and the stability of sugar price in the world market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Adaptation to Global Climate Change)
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