Topical Collection "Contemporary Glass Art: Materiality and Digital Technologies"

A topical collection in Arts (ISSN 2076-0752). This collection belongs to the section "Applied Arts".

Editor

Dr. Jessamy Kelly
Website
Collection Editor
Director of Postgraduate Taught, Lecturer in Glass, Vice Chair of the RAFT Research Group, School of Design, Edinburgh College of Art, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9YL, UK
Interests: glassmaking; glass design; art glass; practice-based research; digital-technologies; collaborative practice; inter-disciplinarity; materiality; mixed media; material combinations

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Glass is a material that we encounter in many forms in our everyday lives; however, as an artistic medium, it is evocative and has an innate beauty that has captured the creative imagination. Art glass is well suited to the pursuit of creative expression, transforming from a liquid to a solid state in front of our eyes. This transitory nature inspires many artists and designers, who are intuitively drawn to this material and the many benefits it offers to creativity. Renowned as being difficult to control, glass practitioners train for many years to understand and master its elusive and contradictory nature. This approach creates a unique type of practice-based research, driven by a tenacity and stubbornness to experiment, challenge, and adapt in the pursuit of new material innovation. This journal will explore the current context of practice-based research in the field of art glass, focused through two themes: 'materiality and making' and 'new digital technologies', thus inviting those in the field who are helping to forge new territories and advanced material discourses to introduce their contributions to the field. Since the late 1990’s, practice-based doctoral research into glass has been forging new innovations in the field and has ensured that this rich discipline continues to evolve as a highly advanced field. Contemporary art glass practitioners continue to pioneer new ways of working and thinking through this material.

This Special Issue will offer a series of papers from a diverse community of researchers and practitioners who are advancing and challenging the boundaries of the field of art glass through their practice-based research. Through their contributions, a current perspective about contemporary art glass will be presented.

We invite potential contributors to submit written reports on their practice-based research, creative practice, innovations, and experiences at the crossings of art, design, and technology in the field of art glass, which will be considered by our review panel.

Dr. Jessamy Kelly
Collection Editor

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Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Arts is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • design and digital technologies
  • materiality and making
  • inter-disciplinarity and collaborative practice
  • mixed media
  • CAD/CAM
  • 3D Printing
  • art glass
  • digital technologies
  • glass design

Published Papers (13 papers)

2020

Jump to: 2019, 2018

Open AccessArticle
Design Glass Objects: The Portuguese Panorama
Arts 2020, 9(3), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts9030079 - 12 Jul 2020
Abstract
The aim of this study is to analyze the convergence of art, design and craftsmanship for the creation of glass objects within the context of the 20th and 21st centuries, in the Portuguese panorama. In the late 1920s and 1950s, Portuguese artists established [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to analyze the convergence of art, design and craftsmanship for the creation of glass objects within the context of the 20th and 21st centuries, in the Portuguese panorama. In the late 1920s and 1950s, Portuguese artists established a growing collaboration with the glass industry situated in the Marinha Grande region and started to produce their work alongside glassblowers. The relationship between artists and craftsmen progressively evolved, influencing the evolution of glass design in Portugal. In the last decades, glass factories have tried to enhance the excellence of their products by appointing designers to develop more elaborate concepts for glass pieces, as well as to improve the quality of the material. This essay will answer questions regarding the relationship and boundaries between design and craft in the creation of glass objects in the context of the state of the art of Portuguese glass design, related to the production of glassblowing glass and the region of Marinha Grande due to its historical importance. A case study will be presented regarding the brand MGlass and the new glass designers in the region. Full article
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2019

Jump to: 2020, 2018

Open AccessArticle
The Mediated Machine: Embracing Digital Technology as a Glass Artist and Student
Arts 2019, 8(1), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010032 - 06 Mar 2019
Abstract
In this essay the author discusses the benefits of introducing digital making tools into the glass artist’s practice-based research, both on a professional and student level. Using an example from his personal creative practice as a case study, the author outlines not only [...] Read more.
In this essay the author discusses the benefits of introducing digital making tools into the glass artist’s practice-based research, both on a professional and student level. Using an example from his personal creative practice as a case study, the author outlines not only the practical benefits of using digital technology, but how when combined with traditional hot-worked glass techniques the synthesis can produce art objects that would otherwise be impossible using either digital or manual means alone. He argues that it is the possibility of inventing novel approaches to art making that can motivate glass artists and students to embrace digital means of making, rather than relying on appeals to practicality and efficiency alone. Includes a description of producing blown glass sculptures that combine fused water-jet cut sheet glass with traditional mold blowing and glass sculpting techniques. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Imitate: Remediating Glass as an Artistic Medium for Material Imitation
Arts 2019, 8(1), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010030 - 04 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Glass has a unique ability to imitate other materials; cross-pollinating with other disciplines to refresh and recreate itself. The creative possibilities of creating glass that imitates other materials such as ceramic, paper, metal, wood, stone, plastic and semi-precious stones are vast. The assertion [...] Read more.
Glass has a unique ability to imitate other materials; cross-pollinating with other disciplines to refresh and recreate itself. The creative possibilities of creating glass that imitates other materials such as ceramic, paper, metal, wood, stone, plastic and semi-precious stones are vast. The assertion of this paper is that the use of imitation is a necessary and definitive act within creative artistic practice. Following a range of historical examples to set the context for this article, a range of contemporary glass artists that use glass as a medium for imitation will be introduced and documented through a series of artists case studies. Finally, I will present my current practice-based research into glass as a medium for imitation. I will discuss the material testing and research that has been carried out and introduce two new bodies of artworks that I have developed based on the theme of glass as an artistic medium for material imitation. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Graphic Swim: 2D and 3D Printing in Glass Casting
Arts 2019, 8(1), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010029 - 04 Mar 2019
Abstract
This document is a report on developing processes to encourage flow of the graphic image in kilnformed glass. It is also a description and reflection on a body of artworks in glass in which new visual qualities were exposed through a mishap and [...] Read more.
This document is a report on developing processes to encourage flow of the graphic image in kilnformed glass. It is also a description and reflection on a body of artworks in glass in which new visual qualities were exposed through a mishap and turned into an aesthetic choice. The research links 2D print approaches to 3D printing and their integration in cast glass. It updates the author’s practice-based PhD research, a study that utilizes glass printing, cutting and fusing processes to combine the printed image within the glass object. The outcomes of the study can be organized under two approaches that have been developed, one appropriate to practical workshop teaching, and the other for the conceptualization and fabrication of new personal artworks. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
On Glass, in Glass, of Glass: Some Developments in the Combination of Glass and Printmaking
Arts 2019, 8(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010021 - 06 Feb 2019
Abstract
This paper considers some examples of creative glass practice and research at the ‘overlap’ of two distinct sectors of art and design—‘glassmaking’ and ‘printmaking’. The unique properties of glass mean that printed imagery can be applied on the glass surface, encapsulated within the [...] Read more.
This paper considers some examples of creative glass practice and research at the ‘overlap’ of two distinct sectors of art and design—‘glassmaking’ and ‘printmaking’. The unique properties of glass mean that printed imagery can be applied on the glass surface, encapsulated within the glass form and can even be made of glass. Case studies are given relating to each of these areas. In particular, the article offers some reflections on the development of glass and print over the last twenty or so years. These reflections are based on the author’s perspectives as an artist, teacher, and researcher. Following a historical overview, case studies are given on the work of Kevin Petrie, Rachel Welford, Miyoung Jung, Jeffrey Sarmiento, and Kathryn Wightman. All of these makers are associated with the Glass and Ceramics Department of the University of Sunderland, UK, based in National Glass Centre, but all have made wider impacts beyond the UK. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Makers Marks: Capturing, Preserving, and Sharing the Sounds of Glassmaking
Arts 2019, 8(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010019 - 30 Jan 2019
Abstract
The Makers Marks Collaborative, an international team of glass artists, visual designers, composers, and engineers, embarked on a project together from 2015–2016 to use the glassmaking studio as a staging ground for interdisciplinary, collaborative making. The team aimed to capture and preserve the [...] Read more.
The Makers Marks Collaborative, an international team of glass artists, visual designers, composers, and engineers, embarked on a project together from 2015–2016 to use the glassmaking studio as a staging ground for interdisciplinary, collaborative making. The team aimed to capture and preserve the sounds of traditional studio glassmaking, and then to share them outside the workshop domain through digital technologies and glass art objects. The goal was also to fulfill a public engagement grant from the Royal Academy of Engineering to highlight the engineering through the art and the engineers’ vision within the art making. The team recorded and isolated the unique sounds of the glassblowing process and its studio environment, and then used the resulting digital sound collection as the foundation for developing artistic outputs: a virtual instrument library, a glass object-instrument of performance, a series of glass objects translating selected virtual instruments, and a music composition. They questioned the nature and materiality of glass through dialogue between media and conversation among team members, while exploring the practice-based research question: “How can we embed our recorded sounds of the glassmaking process back into the glass itself?” This paper focuses on the collaborative, interdisciplinary making process of the team, the project outputs, and the metaphorical language that was a key process facilitation tool. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
From the Application of Printings to Metal Inclusions in Glass: Development of Techniques
Arts 2019, 8(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010018 - 29 Jan 2019
Abstract
This paper introduces the author’s practice-based research and the developed pioneering methods of application of printing inclusions and metal inclusions in glass. It also describes and examines the problems occurring during the application of printing and metal inclusions in glass and presents methods [...] Read more.
This paper introduces the author’s practice-based research and the developed pioneering methods of application of printing inclusions and metal inclusions in glass. It also describes and examines the problems occurring during the application of printing and metal inclusions in glass and presents methods for the selection of suitable materials and techniques. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
S-O-T Body Repairs: Narrative Pursuits
Arts 2019, 8(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010016 - 23 Jan 2019
Abstract
This paper is a metaphorical extension of my practice of intertwining my conceptual/theoretical development with my personal history. Allowing the autobiographical narrative to become the driver of my practice has had a profound influence on my work. This has resulted in changes in [...] Read more.
This paper is a metaphorical extension of my practice of intertwining my conceptual/theoretical development with my personal history. Allowing the autobiographical narrative to become the driver of my practice has had a profound influence on my work. This has resulted in changes in the intention and scale of my work and new approaches to making, with a re-evaluation of the hierarchy of processes and materials. Written as a reflective case study, from a practice-led research perspective, the paper illustrates a realignment in creative methodology from a craft-based practitioner specialising in kiln-formed glass, to that of a mixed media sculptor. This transition was made in response to my desire to break free of my perceived confines as a craft practitioner, with a focus on technical excellence and the predominant language of glass, and place the concept at the forefront of my practice. This enabled me to explore the relationship of personal geographies of landscapes, to inform my prevailing concepts of corporeal vulnerabilities, in a more integral way. S-O-T Body Repairs was the title of a solo exhibition that sprang from this body of research and is discussed in this paper. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
An Empirical Approach to Colour in Glass
Arts 2019, 8(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010015 - 18 Jan 2019
Abstract
This paper focuses on the characteristics and use of transparent homogenous coloured glass for cast glass sculpture. It provides an overview of glass colouring agents and their characteristics, and establishes factors that influence the appearance of colour in glass. Methods to visually evaluate [...] Read more.
This paper focuses on the characteristics and use of transparent homogenous coloured glass for cast glass sculpture. It provides an overview of glass colouring agents and their characteristics, and establishes factors that influence the appearance of colour in glass. Methods to visually evaluate appropriate colour density for a given form are discussed, as well as essential characteristics that a form must possess to achieve results within a density threshold area, where coloured glass changes in value and/or hue between thick and thin sections. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Calligraphic Glass: Making Marks with Glass
Arts 2019, 8(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010012 - 15 Jan 2019
Abstract
Calligraphic glass is one of the newer developments in contemporary glass art. The long-standing tradition of calligraphy is a rich source of inspiration for the glass artist, glass being a relatively new material for spontaneous mark-making. The investigation of the calligraphic quality of [...] Read more.
Calligraphic glass is one of the newer developments in contemporary glass art. The long-standing tradition of calligraphy is a rich source of inspiration for the glass artist, glass being a relatively new material for spontaneous mark-making. The investigation of the calligraphic quality of artworks ultimately leads to a discussion of human body movement, because mark-making is fundamentally a kinetic exercise. Often, the artist’s psychological and physical state is more important than the resultant marks. Building upon my doctoral research, which introduced the basic idea and techniques of ‘calligraphic lampworking’, this paper develops the discussion mainly regarding how the artist’s body movement may be manifested as spatial traces made from glass lines. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Tools for Tooling: Digital Fabrication Technology as the Innovation Enabler
Arts 2019, 8(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010009 - 09 Jan 2019
Abstract
This paper describes research concerning the creation of a novel sheet glass forming system based on the Reconfigurable Pin Tooling (RPT) principle. The paper will initially outline some of the theoretical and technical background for the research. These contexts particularly concern tools and [...] Read more.
This paper describes research concerning the creation of a novel sheet glass forming system based on the Reconfigurable Pin Tooling (RPT) principle. The paper will initially outline some of the theoretical and technical background for the research. These contexts particularly concern tools and innovation environments as well as a brief overview of the history of the RPT concept. A description of the development of the tooling systems through practice-based research is then provided followed by coverage of creative explorations with this new glass-forming method. Based on the results of the research, the author argues that digital fabrication technologies can provide the key toolsets for individual creative practitioners to successfully innovate through their own toolmaking projects. This argument is evidenced by artefacts (glass bowls) produced by the author using the RPT systems developed during the research; these glass bowls have been widely exhibited and received both critical as well as commercial acclaim. The article concludes with observations from this research and reflections on the findings. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Glass—A Material Practice in the Anthropocene
Arts 2019, 8(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8010007 - 08 Jan 2019
Abstract
This paper details and discusses Material Journey (2018), an art project by the author that was exhibited at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland (UK) from 9 June to 2 September 2018. This research project sought to interrogate the material impact of one [...] Read more.
This paper details and discusses Material Journey (2018), an art project by the author that was exhibited at the National Glass Centre in Sunderland (UK) from 9 June to 2 September 2018. This research project sought to interrogate the material impact of one art project made of glass by carefully considering the different stages of making—from design to production to the exhibition phase. The carbon footprint of an energy intensive material such as glass is often considered anathema to sustainable making practices in the field of applied arts. Whilst this paper makes the case that the material impact of individual art practices is negligible in the global context of carbon footprints, it nevertheless argues that the craft of ‘making’ has a critical role to play in the Anthropocene. Critically, this project is one of the first art projects in glass that critically examines the carbon footprint of a material practice. It is argued that this conversation is long overdue but makes the case that the tools for understanding and calculating the carbon footprint of a material practice are currently lacking and need more development. Full article
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2018

Jump to: 2020, 2019

Open AccessArticle
Developing Inlaid Colouring Technique for Hot-Glass Making Process
Arts 2018, 7(4), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts7040089 - 26 Nov 2018
Abstract
This article discusses both the complexity and technical benefits of developing an inlaid colouring technique for the hot glass-making process. This technique was inspired by the ancient Korean ceramic decorative technique known as Sanggam, and has allowed me to delineate geometric patterns [...] Read more.
This article discusses both the complexity and technical benefits of developing an inlaid colouring technique for the hot glass-making process. This technique was inspired by the ancient Korean ceramic decorative technique known as Sanggam, and has allowed me to delineate geometric patterns and counterfeit letters onto glass artworks, before encapsulating them between layers of transparent glass. By developing a typography design that deliberately chooses the wrong consonant and vowel letters, and combines Korean characters, the resulting designs do not fit into either South Korean or British visual culture. A number of optical properties (in particular refraction, reflection, and distortion) provoke a sense of ambiguity in the viewer’s visual experience of, as well as their response to, a series of glass artworks created for experimental purposes. The technique offers an innovative creative tool for artists working in the field of glass art, enabling them to depict expressive drawings and images through a line drawing style, using diverse colours, and in a more controlled manner than the hot glass-making process of the ‘Graal’ technique. The technical possibilities and limitations of the inlaid glass colouring technique are addressed at each step of the development process, while examples of the technical palette serve as a useful reference for artists working in the field of glass art. Full article
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