applsci-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Impact-Resistant Composites: Design and Damage Control

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2022) | Viewed by 11436

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Peloponnese, 1 Megalou Alexandrou Street, GR-26334 Patras, Greece
Interests: analysis and design of structures; fracture mechanics - structural failures; contact mechanics - friction; computational methods: finite element method, boundary element method, molecular dynamics, molecular mechanics; materials science; thermomechanical interactions of material components; characterization of materials, nanomaterials, composite and nanocomposite structures, nanosystems; algorithms; quality management and control; project management; artificial intelligence
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The damage of composite structures which is caused by impact loadings is one of the most critical failures that commonly lead to numerous significant design problems, safety issues, fault detection and evaluation problems, as well as maintenance difficulties.

Several research issues should be addressed considering all the recent developments regarding the impact behavior of composites in order to advance the technology in significant industrial fields, such as automotive, aerospace, marine transportation, and renewable energy structures.

The accurate characterization of the impact damage of composite materials and structures, the evaluation, diagnosis, and real-time monitoring of their structural condition under the circumstances of impact, the efficient manufacturing of safe composite components against impact loadings are some of the most interesting issues to be investigated.

The aim of the proposed Special Issue is to shed light on all the aforementioned aspects of composite impact damage. The investigation and assessment of the relevant failure mechanics via both computational as well as experimental methodologies, the proposal of new cost-effective, reliable, smart composite media, designs, manufacturing techniques, and structural heath monitoring procedures are key subjects that this Special Issue aims to cover.

Dr. Georgios Ι. Giannopoulos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Impact damage assessment
  • Impact damage detection
  • Experimental methods on evaluating faults, defects, delamination, and cracks
  • Computational methods on evaluating faults, defects, delamination, and cracks
  • Intelligent methods for monitoring the structural degradation
  • Prognosis of structural health of composites under impact
  • Smart materials preventing the catastrophic impact failure
  • Sandwich composites
  • Multilayer composites
  • Fibre-reinforced materials
  • Nano-reinforced materials
  • Repair methodologies of damaged composite structures due to impact
  • Addictive manufacturing for producing enhanced materials for impact

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

11 pages, 30139 KiB  
Article
Impact Properties of Novel Natural Fibre Metal Laminated Composite Materials
by Luciano Machado Gomes Vieira, Yousef Dobah, Júlio César dos Santos, Túlio Hallak Panzera, Juan Carlos Campos Rubio and Fabrizio Scarpa
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(4), 1869; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12041869 - 11 Feb 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2695
Abstract
Fibre metal laminates (FMLs) are lightweight structures with high structural performance and are suitable for many industrial applications. This work describes the impact behaviour of novel sisal fibre-reinforced aluminium laminates (SiRAL) and their dependence upon the orientations of the fibres, the composite core [...] Read more.
Fibre metal laminates (FMLs) are lightweight structures with high structural performance and are suitable for many industrial applications. This work describes the impact behaviour of novel sisal fibre-reinforced aluminium laminates (SiRAL) and their dependence upon the orientations of the fibres, the composite core used and the surface treatment of the metal skins. A cold-pressing technique is used to produce SiRALs in six configurations. The FMLs here also have treated or untreated aluminium skins (2024 T3) and three different types of core materials (0°/90° fabric, ±45° fabric and random matt). The ±45° core treated SiRAL provides the highest energy absorption and deflection properties. The pre-treatment of aluminium skins using sandpaper, deep cleaning and primer significantly affects the delamination of the panels under bending impact. The findings reveal that the SiRAL concept is a promising multifunctional FML suitable for different applications that require lightweight, bending and impact performance, together with sustainability characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact-Resistant Composites: Design and Damage Control)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 6870 KiB  
Article
A Tunable Metamaterial Joint for Mechanical Shock Applications Inspired by Carbon Nanotubes
by Georgios I. Giannopoulos and Stylianos K. Georgantzinos
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(23), 11139; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112311139 - 24 Nov 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1928
Abstract
The significant developments of additive manufacturing and especially 3D-printing technologies have broadened the application field of metamaterials. The present study aims at establishing the main design parameters of a novel 3D-printed polymer-based joint. The proposed joint can efficiently absorb impact energy, relieving the [...] Read more.
The significant developments of additive manufacturing and especially 3D-printing technologies have broadened the application field of metamaterials. The present study aims at establishing the main design parameters of a novel 3D-printed polymer-based joint. The proposed joint can efficiently absorb impact energy, relieving the material components from extensive plastic deformations. The design of the machine element is inspired by the molecular structure of carbon nanotubes and appropriately adjusted in such a way that it has the ability to partially transform translational motion to rotational motion and, thus, provide axial structural protection from compressive shocks. The utilized material is a photosensitive resin that is typically utilized in 3D manufacturing processes. Experiments are utilized to characterize the mechanical performance of the raw material as well as the static compressive behavior of the joint. Finally, finite element simulations are performed to test the developed design under impact loadings characterized by different frequencies. The damping capabilities of the metamaterial-based joint are revealed and discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact-Resistant Composites: Design and Damage Control)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 5312 KiB  
Article
Effect of Unit-Cell Size on the Barely Visible Impact Damage in Woven Composites
by Hassan M. El-Dessouky, Mohamed Nasr Saleh, Ying Wang and Mohamed S. Alotaibi
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(5), 2364; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11052364 - 7 Mar 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2486
Abstract
The effect of the weaving architecture and the z-binding yarns, for 2D and 3D woven composites on the low-velocity impact resistance of carbon fibre reinforced composites, is investigated and benchmarked against noncrimp fabric (NCF). Four architectures, namely: NCF, 2D plain weave (2D-PW), 3D [...] Read more.
The effect of the weaving architecture and the z-binding yarns, for 2D and 3D woven composites on the low-velocity impact resistance of carbon fibre reinforced composites, is investigated and benchmarked against noncrimp fabric (NCF). Four architectures, namely: NCF, 2D plain weave (2D-PW), 3D orthogonal: plain (ORT-PW) and twill (ORT-TW), were subjected to 15 J impact using a 16 mm-diameter, 6.7 kg hemispherical impactor. Nondestructive techniques, including ultrasonic C-scanning, Digital Image Correlation (DIC) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) were used to map and quantify the size of the induced barely visible impact damage (BVID). The energy absorption of each architecture was correlated to the damage size: both in-plane and in-depth directions. The 3D architectures, regardless of their unit-cell size, demonstrated the highest impact resistance as opposed to 2D-PW and the NCF. X-ray CT segmentation showed the effect of the higher frequency of the z-binding yarns, in the ORT-PW case, in delamination and crack arresting even when compared to the other 3D architecture (ORT-TW). Among all the architectures, ORT-PW exhibited the highest damage resistance with the least damage size. This suggests that accurate design of the z-binding yarns’ path and more importantly its frequency in 3D woven architectures is essential for impact-resistant composite structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact-Resistant Composites: Design and Damage Control)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 9502 KiB  
Article
Newly Developed Anti-Buckling Fixture to Assess the In-Plane Crashworthiness of Flat Composite Specimens
by Iman Babaei, Ravin Garg, Lorenzo Vigna, Davide Salvatore Paolino, Giovanni Belingardi, Lucio Cascone, Andrea Calzolari and Giuseppe Galizia
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(21), 7797; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10217797 - 3 Nov 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3186
Abstract
Despite superior specific mechanical characteristics of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRPs), a lack of understanding of their fracture mechanisms under different impact conditions has limited the application of CFRP energy-absorbing structures. To avoid complex and expensive tests on the final structure, it is more convenient [...] Read more.
Despite superior specific mechanical characteristics of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRPs), a lack of understanding of their fracture mechanisms under different impact conditions has limited the application of CFRP energy-absorbing structures. To avoid complex and expensive tests on the final structure, it is more convenient to test flat elements. To prevent catastrophic crushing due to the global buckling, flat specimens must be supported by a specific fixture. Previously developed fixtures had shortcomings like tearing of the specimen, jamming of the fixture, short crushable length, or they were specifically designed only for one failure mode. This newly designed fixture overcomes the limitations of previously published solutions. The final configuration includes cylindrical anti-buckling columns 10 mm in diameter and spaced 65 mm apart with adjustable heights. The fixture is designed for rectangular specimens with dimensions of 150 × 100 mm and different thicknesses up to 16 mm, like the ones mandated by the ASTM D7137 standard test method for compression after impact analysis. Other features of this new fixture are the possibility to study the effects of different defects on the crashworthiness of composites, higher crushing area, and integration with Instron drop tower and hydraulic testing machines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact-Resistant Composites: Design and Damage Control)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop