applsci-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Applied Microbiology in Food Technology

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 February 2022) | Viewed by 24853

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail
Guest Editor
Instituto de Agroquímica y Tecnología de Alimentos, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 46980 Paterna, Spain
Interests: food science and technology; food processing and engineering; functional food

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto Universitario de Ingeniería de Alimentos para el Desarrollo, Universitat Politècnica de València, 46022 Valencia, Spain
Interests: food engineering; food processing; food science and technology; food waste valorization; functional foods development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The importance of probiotic functional foods is already clear for science, governments, industries, and universities. A huge scientific knowledge on the effect of probiotic microorganisms, microbiota, and host health is being developed. An increased knowledge of the metabolic routes in the human organism, the development of innovative techniques to enhance probiotic properties, and the identification of bacterial consortia through bioinformatics are some of the most significant advances.

Probiotic foods can help to prevent or improve the treatment of physiological disorders (digestive, immune, metabolic, etc.), and they also represent a potential alternative strategy to fight excessive use of antibiotics which can produce antibiotic resistances and result in a high cost for European health systems, waste generation, and effluent contamination. However, the effectiveness of probiotic microorganisms is conditioned by several factors.

Foods are mostly complex mixtures of macro- and microcomponents organized in a structure that can trap active compounds, modulating their release or inhibiting their activity. There is currently little information regarding the extent to which the benefits of probiotics depend on the food matrix in which they are delivered.

This Special Issue focuses on research studies devoted to studying the effect of food technologies on probiotic microorganisms incorporated into a food matrix (liquid, solid or foam). Scientific or review papers addressed at determining the bioaccessibility of probiotic microorganisms after food processing or storage are welcome. Studies to elucidate, via in depth analysis, the interactions among ingredients during fermentation and processing, the determination of the functional properties of the probiotic microorganisms, and their interplay through gastrointestinal passage are topics of special interest.

Dr. Ester Betoret
Dr. Noelia Betoret
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • probiotic
  • functional foods
  • technology
  • processing
  • bioaccessibility

Published Papers (7 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

2 pages, 173 KiB  
Editorial
Special Issue on Applied Microbiology in Food Technology
by Ester Betoret and Noelia Betoret
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(19), 9559; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12199559 - 23 Sep 2022
Viewed by 837
Abstract
Food science and technology plays a very important role in designing and developing new foods, and in improving the safety, nutritional and organoleptic quality of processed foods [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Microbiology in Food Technology)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

12 pages, 4683 KiB  
Article
Characterization of Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus, Levilactobacillus brevis and Lactiplantibacillus plantarum Metabolites and Evaluation of Their Antimicrobial Activity against Food Pathogens
by Despina Vougiouklaki, Theofania Tsironi, Joseph Papaparaskevas, Panagiotis Halvatsiotis and Dimitra Houhoula
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(2), 660; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12020660 - 10 Jan 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2114
Abstract
Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play an important role as natural food preservatives. However, the characterization of the variety of their metabolites is limited. The objective of this study was to determine the production of specific metabolites of Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus, Levilactobacillus brevis and [...] Read more.
Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play an important role as natural food preservatives. However, the characterization of the variety of their metabolites is limited. The objective of this study was to determine the production of specific metabolites of Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus, Levilactobacillus brevis and Lactiplantibacillus plantarum by an optimized liquid chromatography with an ultraviolet/diode detection (HPLC-UV/DAD) method and to investigate their potential antimicrobial activity against specific food pathogens. Based on the results of this study, the main metabolites detected in Levilactobacillus brevis were 103.4 μg mL−1 DL-p-Hydroxyphenyllactic acid (OH-PLA) and 2.59 μg mL−1 vanillic acid, while 216.2 μg mL−1 OH-PLA, 19.0 μg mL−1 salicylic acid, 3.7 μg mL−1 vanillic acid, 6.9 μg mL−1 ferulic acid, 4.2 μg mL−1 benzoic acid and 1.4 μg mL−1 4-Hydrocinnamic acid were identified in the Lactiplantibacillus plantarum strain and 147.6 μg mL−1 OH-PLA and 4.9 μg mL−1 ferulic acid were identified in Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus. This study provides alternative approaches for the molecules involved in the antimicrobial activity of food microorganism fermentation. These molecules may be used as antimicrobial ingredients in the food industry instead of conventional chemical preservatives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Microbiology in Food Technology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 1472 KiB  
Article
Fermentation of Lulo Juice with Lactobacillus reuteri CECT 925. Properties and Effect of High Homogenization Pressures on Resistance to In Vitro Gastrointestinal Digestion
by Leidy Indira Hinestroza-Córdoba, Ester Betoret, Lucía Seguí, Cristina Barrera and Noelia Betoret
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(22), 10909; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112210909 - 18 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1912
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of lulo juice as substrate for producing a potentially probiotic beverage with Lactobacillus reuteri CECT 925. Lulo juices at two pH levels and two levels of HPH treatment have been considered to evaluate [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of lulo juice as substrate for producing a potentially probiotic beverage with Lactobacillus reuteri CECT 925. Lulo juices at two pH levels and two levels of HPH treatment have been considered to evaluate the effect of these variables on Lactobacillus reuteri CECT 925 growth, physicochemical and antioxidant properties, and the resistance of microbial cells to gastrointestinal digestion in vitro. Regarding the growth of Lactobacillus reuteri CECT 925, it was mainly affected by the pH of the medium, the rectified juice at pH 5.5 being the most appropriated one. The growth of Lactobacillus reuteri CECT 925 mainly increased the antiradical capacity of the juices. In general, Lactobacillus reuteri CECT 925 showed good resistance to in vitro gastrointestinal digestion conditions, reaching levels above 107 CFU/mL in all cases. The highest resistance was observed in the juice treated at 150 MPa followed by the juice homogenized at 100 MPa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Microbiology in Food Technology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

8 pages, 250 KiB  
Article
Analysis of the Major Probiotics in Healthy Women’s Breast Milk by Realtime PCR. Factors Affecting the Presence of Those Bacteria
by Georgia Nikolopoulou, Theofania Tsironi, Panagiotis Halvatsiotis, Ekaterini Petropoulou, Nikolaos Genaris, Despina Vougiouklaki, Dionyssios Antonopoulos, Apollon Thomas, Anastasia Tsilia, Anthimia Batrinou, Efstathia Tsakali, Jan F. M. Van Impe and Dimitra Houhoula
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(20), 9400; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11209400 - 10 Oct 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3662
Abstract
Breast milk has been reported as a bacteria source that affects infant gut microbiota development. The present study utilizes a realtime PCR method to identify Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium spp. in the breast milk of healthy women and attempts to identify factors affecting those [...] Read more.
Breast milk has been reported as a bacteria source that affects infant gut microbiota development. The present study utilizes a realtime PCR method to identify Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium spp. in the breast milk of healthy women and attempts to identify factors affecting those human milk bacteria. Breast milk samples—both colostrum and mature milk—of 100 healthy women, were collected in Greece along with data about the demographic factors and nutritional habits of the volunteers. The colostrum samples were found to have higher percentages of either Bifidobacterium or Lactobacillus (76.9% and 48.6%, respectively) compared to the mature milk samples. For younger women, aged from 18 to 29 years, and women from rural areas, bacteria were detected in higher incidence than for older groups and women in urban areas, respectively. Moreover, for high-BMI women, bacteria were detected in lower incidence than for those with normal BMI. Probiotic supplements did not affect the composition of the breast milk-identified bacteria. Various factors such as lactation stage, maternal age, maternal weight, and residential location may contribute to the presence of those species in human milk. RT PCR has significant potential for the microbiological analysis of human milk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Microbiology in Food Technology)
8 pages, 2061 KiB  
Article
A Simple Method for Assessing Diversity and Dynamics of Microbial Community: Comparison of Dairy Phages from Industrial and Spontaneous Fermentation
by Agnieszka Olejnik-Schmidt, Bernadeta Pietrzak, Iwona Kawacka, Klaudia Malak, Weronika Wawrzyniak and Marcin Schmidt
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(19), 8915; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11198915 - 24 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1422
Abstract
Background: The dairy industry heavily relies on fermentation processes driven in high proportion by Lactococcus lactis. The fermentation process can be perturbed or even stopped by bacteriophage activity, leading to complete loss of fermentation batch or decreased quality product. The monitoring [...] Read more.
Background: The dairy industry heavily relies on fermentation processes driven in high proportion by Lactococcus lactis. The fermentation process can be perturbed or even stopped by bacteriophage activity, leading to complete loss of fermentation batch or decreased quality product. The monitoring of the phage diversity and dynamics in the process allows implementing protective measures (e.g., starter rotation) to maintain unperturbed production. Methods: Universal primers were used to amplify sequences of the 936, c2, and P335 Lactococcus phage types. The amplicons were sequenced with the Sanger method and obtained degenerate sequences were analyzed using a simple bioinformatic pipeline in the R environment. Results: The most prevalent phage type is 936, followed by P335, whereas the c2 type is less frequent. Conclusions: Curd cheeses prepared on non-pasteurized milk based on native milk microbiota had a higher diversity of phages distinct from those found in dairy plants. Sanger sequencing of heterogenous amplicons generated on metagenome DNA can be used to assess low-complexity microbiota diversity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Microbiology in Food Technology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

13 pages, 812 KiB  
Review
Probiotics in Functional Foods: Survival Assessment and Approaches for Improved Viability
by Jeyanthi Palanivelu, Sundaram Thanigaivel, Sundaram Vickram, Nibedita Dey, Dasha Mihaylova and Ivelina Desseva
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(1), 455; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12010455 - 4 Jan 2022
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 9880
Abstract
Nowadays, food is no longer just for nutrition. Consumers are more demanding and expect to get health benefits from their daily meals. Various areas of the food industry are in great demand of functional chemicals to enhance the taste and nutritional value of [...] Read more.
Nowadays, food is no longer just for nutrition. Consumers are more demanding and expect to get health benefits from their daily meals. Various areas of the food industry are in great demand of functional chemicals to enhance the taste and nutritional value of their products. Probiotic bacteria have already been part of the human’s routine for good gut microbiota maintenance in terms of pharmaceutical products. Their incorporation in food however is a challenging task that offers great opportunities but has limitations as well. Specifically, the purpose of this review is to emphasize the importance of probiotics in food, to assess their survival through gastrointestinal tract, and to highlight the recent advances in approaches for their improved viability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Microbiology in Food Technology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 545 KiB  
Review
In Vitro Simulation of Human Colonic Fermentation: A Practical Approach towards Models’ Design and Analytical Tools
by Elena Veintimilla-Gozalbo, Andrea Asensio-Grau, Joaquim Calvo-Lerma, Ana Heredia and Ana Andrés
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(17), 8135; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11178135 - 2 Sep 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3663
Abstract
The human colonic microbiota plays an important role in the food digestion process and has a key role in maintaining health status. This community of microbes is inter-individually different due to several factors that modulate its composition. Among them, diet is one of [...] Read more.
The human colonic microbiota plays an important role in the food digestion process and has a key role in maintaining health status. This community of microbes is inter-individually different due to several factors that modulate its composition. Among them, diet is one of the most relevant, which, in turn, is affected by environmental, economic, and cultural considerations. These pieces of evidence have promoted the study of the influence of diet on gut microbiota and the development of in vitro models that simulate the colonic digestion of foods. This narrative review aims to present a technical approach of the in vitro gut models available to evaluate the impact of diet on human colonic microbiota. A description and comments on the main characteristics, parameters, applicability, faecal inoculum preparation, and analytical tools are made. Despite the progress of in vitro colonic digestion models and metaomic applicability in this research field, there are still some challenges to face due to the lack of a consensus on the methodologies to conduct in vitro colonic digestions and the need to integrate the metaomic data to fully understand the influence of food in human colonic microbiota. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applied Microbiology in Food Technology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop