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Innovations in Food Science and Engineering for a Sustainable Food System

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Food".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 17564

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Instituto Universitario de Ingeniería de Alimentos–FoodUPV (Food Engineering Research Institute) of the Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia, Spain
Interests: food engineering; food processing; food waste valorization; functional foods development; drying; fermentation; in vitro digestion
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto Universitario de Ingeniería de Alimentos para el Desarrollo, Universitat Politècnica de València, 46022 Valencia, Spain
Interests: food engineering; food processing; food science and technology; food waste valorization; functional foods development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto Universitario de Ingeniería de Alimentos–FoodUPV (Food Engineering Research Institute) of the Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia, Spain
Interests: food engineering; food processing; food waste valorization; functional foods development; drying; fermentation; in vitro digestion
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Sustainability of the food system involves all stages, from production, to transformation, distribution, and consumption, along with waste disposal and valorization. Food transformation processes must face sustainability of the food system in a holistic manner, generating environmental, social, and economic value.

As defined by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, a sustainable food system must be able to ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns, as well as deliver safe, healthy, and nutritious diets. Accordingly, the food industry must incorporate processes and products which provide both a lower environmental impact and an increased positive impact on diets and health.

Papers contributing to this Special Issue are expected to address:

  • Innovations in food processing which contribute to reduce the environmental impact and increase nutritional value of foods;
  • Innovations in food processing which contribute to reduce food losses and/or are innovative approaches to valorize food waste from processing stages;
  • Innovation in functional food design to produce food products with an increased nutritional value, by reintroducing food byproducts in the economic cycle;
  • Food science and engineering approaches which are focused on food system sustainability for more sustainable processes and diets.

Dr. Lucía Seguí
Dr. Noelia Betoret
Dr. Cristina Puigdollers
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainable food systems
  • Sustainable food processes
  • Food waste valorization
  • Functional food design
  • Sustainable diets
  • Food system circularity

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 924 KiB  
Article
Effects of Processing and Storage Conditions on Functional Properties of Powdered Blueberry Pomace
by Laura Calabuig-Jiménez, Leidy Indira Hinestroza-Córdoba, Cristina Barrera, Lucía Seguí and Noelia Betoret
Sustainability 2022, 14(3), 1839; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031839 - 5 Feb 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2681
Abstract
Promoting a circular economy through valorisation of food processing waste into functional ingredients is a challenge today. The combination of hot air drying with milling is a cheap and highly available option for obtaining powdered products from blueberry pomace, a residue with a [...] Read more.
Promoting a circular economy through valorisation of food processing waste into functional ingredients is a challenge today. The combination of hot air drying with milling is a cheap and highly available option for obtaining powdered products from blueberry pomace, a residue with a large amount of fibre and a high proportion of polyphenols from the fruit. The objective of this work was to analyse the effect of drying temperature (60 °C and 70 °C) and granulometry (coarse and fine) on physicochemical properties, including antioxidant properties and monomeric anthocyanins content. The potential prebiotic effect of blueberry pomace powders, as well as their water and oil interaction properties, were also assessed. Stability of physicochemical properties over 20 weeks of storage was also evaluated. Powders obtained showed a total fibre content higher than 30% with a good proportion between insoluble and soluble fractions and a high retention of monomeric anthocyanins from fresh pomace (75% at 60 °C and 66% at 70 °C). The powders showed good water interaction properties and interesting technological properties, such as solubility and hygroscopicity, which were not affected by differences in particle size. Stability of powders’ physicochemical properties was evidenced throughout the storage period. Full article
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27 pages, 3322 KiB  
Article
Upscaling via a Prospective LCA: A Case Study on Tomato Homogenate Using a Near-to-Market Pasteurisation Technology
by Maria Calero, Gabriela Clemente, Dinar Fartdinov, Sancho Bañón, Israel Muñoz and Neus Sanjuán
Sustainability 2022, 14(3), 1716; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031716 - 2 Feb 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2505
Abstract
Thanks to food technology, the production of cold tomato soups such as salmorejo, a traditional Spanish dish, has become industrialised. Thermal treatments play an important role in ready-to-eat meals, prolonging their shelf-life. Radiofrequency (RF) heating is less energy-intensive than conventional heat exchangers [...] Read more.
Thanks to food technology, the production of cold tomato soups such as salmorejo, a traditional Spanish dish, has become industrialised. Thermal treatments play an important role in ready-to-eat meals, prolonging their shelf-life. Radiofrequency (RF) heating is less energy-intensive than conventional heat exchangers and has been successfully used to pasteurise food; novel applications, however, provide results at laboratory or pilot scale, so conclusions might not be translatable to industry. In this study, a prospective Life-Cycle Assessment of salmorejo pasteurised using RF was performed to highlight the relevance of upscaling and to compare its environmental impacts with those of conventional pasteurisation. “Gate-to-gate” results show that the pilot has greater environmental impacts due to its greater energy consumption, as thermal energy is not recovered. The packing and landfill of organic waste exhibit the highest impacts at industrial scale. RF technology does not imply significant environmental improvements versus conventional pasteurisation. Potential changes in the energy background of future scenarios have relevant consequences in the environmental impacts. “Farm-to-factory-gate” analysis highlights ingredients and tomato valorisation as the most impacting stages. The prospective LCA of scaled up scenarios constitutes a tool for environmental screening in food ecodesign, contributing to Sustainable Development Goal 12. Full article
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11 pages, 1126 KiB  
Article
Sustainable Development of Apple Snack Formulated with Blueberry Juice and Trehalose
by Juan Manuel Castagnini, Silvia Tappi, Urszula Tylewicz, Santina Romani, Pietro Rocculi and Marco Dalla Rosa
Sustainability 2021, 13(16), 9204; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13169204 - 17 Aug 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1940
Abstract
Novel products that carry concrete and relevant health benefits, with texture and flavor not substantially different from already available products, are generally well accepted by consumers. Vacuum impregnation is a non-thermal technology that allows the enrichment of fruit with different ingredients in solution. [...] Read more.
Novel products that carry concrete and relevant health benefits, with texture and flavor not substantially different from already available products, are generally well accepted by consumers. Vacuum impregnation is a non-thermal technology that allows the enrichment of fruit with different ingredients in solution. The characteristic of the resulting product is a combination of both the solid matrix and the impregnation solution. This work aimed at: (i) evaluating the effect of trehalose on anthocyanin retention after drying of apple snacks vacuum impregnated with blueberry juice; (ii) modelling the air-drying kinetic, proposing an image analysis approach to monitor the drying process. Four mathematical models successfully fitted the drying experimental data, obtainingequations that could be used in the implementation of this process at industrial scale. The drying kinetics of samples impregnated with blueberry juice and trehalose were faster when compared to the control sample. Samples impregnated with blueberry juice and 100 g/kg of trehalose retained nearly four times more anthocyanin after drying when compared to the control. Full article
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15 pages, 2342 KiB  
Article
Characterization of Ionic Exchange and Macroporous Resins for Their Application on the Separation and Recovery of Chlorogenic Acid from the Wastewater of Artichoke Blanching
by Antonio D. Rodriguez-Lopez, Milagro Reig, Luis Mayor, Mireia Ortiz-Climent and Esperanza M. Garcia-Castello
Sustainability 2021, 13(16), 8928; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13168928 - 10 Aug 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1807
Abstract
Food wastes have traditionally been considered as dead-end materials; however, recent international, national, and regional policies strongly promote the use of these wastes as potential resources. This change of perception considers the need for sustainable exploitation of natural resources. In this context, artichoke [...] Read more.
Food wastes have traditionally been considered as dead-end materials; however, recent international, national, and regional policies strongly promote the use of these wastes as potential resources. This change of perception considers the need for sustainable exploitation of natural resources. In this context, artichoke processing produces high amounts of wastewaters, and specifically, wastewaters from the artichoke blanching step present a high content of valuable biocomponents such as carbohydrates and phenolic compounds (e.g., chlorogenic acid, 1700 ppm). In this work, the recovery of chlorogenic acid by applying sorption processes was studied. Five resins were tested, and it was found that the resin XAD 7 HP presented the best total adsorption-desorption yield (72.8%) at 20 °C. It was also found that there was a strong variation of the adsorption ratio depending on solution pH (3–7). Four models of isotherms were applied to the adsorption processes, and the Langmuir isotherm better explained the adsorption behavior. The kinetic study showed that the adsorption and desorption of chlorogenic acid followed a pseudo-second order model where the kinetic constant depended on the adsorbate concentration. In addition, it was found that the sorption process was controlled by more than just the intraparticle diffusion mechanism. Full article
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18 pages, 10954 KiB  
Article
Spirulina platensis Protein as Sustainable Ingredient for Nutritional Food Products Development
by Milena M. Ramírez-Rodrigues, Carolina Estrada-Beristain, Jorge Metri-Ojeda, Alexa Pérez-Alva and Diana K. Baigts-Allende
Sustainability 2021, 13(12), 6849; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126849 - 17 Jun 2021
Cited by 38 | Viewed by 7645
Abstract
Spirulina platensis, microalgae, is emerging as a sustainable source for highly nutritional food ingredient production to cover the food demands of the global population. This study aimed to characterize food prototypes supplemented with microalgae protein isolate to develop health-promoting food products. The [...] Read more.
Spirulina platensis, microalgae, is emerging as a sustainable source for highly nutritional food ingredient production to cover the food demands of the global population. This study aimed to characterize food prototypes supplemented with microalgae protein isolate to develop health-promoting food products. The nutritional composition (proximate composition, fatty acids, and mineral content) of the spirulina biomass, the structural characterization of spirulina platensis protein (SPP) isolates, and the physicochemical properties of SPP- developed food products were evaluated. High protein (47%), ϒ-Linolenic acid (24.45 g/100 g of fat), iron (16.27 mg/100 g), calcium (207 mg/100 g), and potassium (1675 mg/100 g) content in the spirulina biomass was found. SPP (76% of purity) with sodium alginate produced stable emulsions (>90%) during storage (14 days). Amaranth + SPP pasta resulted in good appearance, texture, color, and high nutritional value in protein (above 30%) and minerals, mainly iron (9–10 mg/100 g) and magnesium (300 mg/100 g), meeting the daily intake recommendations. In addition, the amino acid profile of the pasta was in line with the amino acid pattern requirements for adults. SPP can be considered as potential additive for emulsions stability and provided nutritional and physicochemical desired in the elaborated pasta. Full article
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