applsci-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Plant Raw Materials as a Source of Health-Promoting Compounds in the Diet

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 August 2023) | Viewed by 7181

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Human Nutrition and Metabolomics, Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin, 24 Broniewskiego Street, 71-460 Szczecin, Poland
Interests: medicinal plants; herbs; edible flowers; phytochemicals; antioxidant activity; phytochemical analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Human Nutrition and Metabolomics, Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin, 24 Broniewskiego Street, 71-460 Szczecin, Poland
Interests: antioxidants; plant extracts; food products; polyphenolic compounds; edible flowers; matcha green tea; food contamination; mycotoxins
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Raw materials and products of plant origin are an important part of a daily balanced diet. They can be a valuable source of nutrients (e.g., proteins, carbohydrates, fats) and bioactive compounds (e.g., vitamins, antioxidants) and fiber. Bioactive components, especially antioxidants, decrease the risk of diseases related to free radical reactions and, at the same time, delay the body’s aging process. Dietary fiber is essential for proper digestion. At the same time, it acts as a prebiotic and influences the quantity and quality of intestinal microbiota. It should be emphasized that other plant components (e.g., polyphenols) also have the ability to modify the intestinal microbiota. In this Special Issue, we would like to focus mainly on raw materials which are less popular in the daily Western diet, such as edible mushrooms (both wild and cultivated), edible flowers, herbs, spice plants, tree and shrub buds, and algae. This Special Issue will be dedicated to widely understood plant raw materials, which, due to their composition and properties, can be a valuable supplement to a daily diet with both nutritional and health-promoting compounds. It will also be very valuable to point out the prebiotic functions and properties able to modulate the intestinal microbiome.

Prof. Dr. Katarzyna Janda-Milczarek
Dr. Karolina Jakubczyk
Dr. Karolina Skonieczna-Żydecka
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plant material
  • chemical composition
  • antioxidant
  • prebiotic
  • microbiome
  • health-promoting effect
  • edible mushrooms
  • flowers
  • herbs
  • buds
  • algae

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

20 pages, 8138 KiB  
Article
The Changes of Antioxidant Activity of Three Varieties of ‘Nalewka’, a Traditional Polish Fruit Alcoholic Beverage during Long-Term Storage
by Anna Nowak, Wiktoria Duchnik, Anna Muzykiewicz-Szymańska, Łukasz Kucharski, Joanna Zielonka-Brzezicka, Andrzej Nowak and Adam Klimowicz
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(2), 1114; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13021114 - 13 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1557
Abstract
The diet rich in fruits is widely recommended for health-promoting properties. Regular consumption of fruits could reduce the risk of many diseases. The fruit-based alcoholic beverages have been produced for centuries and, in many countries, are still very popular. ‘Nalewka’ is a traditional [...] Read more.
The diet rich in fruits is widely recommended for health-promoting properties. Regular consumption of fruits could reduce the risk of many diseases. The fruit-based alcoholic beverages have been produced for centuries and, in many countries, are still very popular. ‘Nalewka’ is a traditional name of Polish liqueur, i.e., an alcoholic beverage made by maceration of fruits. Homemade nalewkas are often stored for a long time before consumption, which can affect the content of valuable secondary metabolites. The aim of the study was to compare the effect of long-time storage on antioxidant activity and total polyphenol, total anthocyanin, tannin as well as gallic acid content in three homemade nalewkas. Cherry, plum, and multifruit nalewka were produced in 1997 and between 2013–2019 years. The antioxidant activity was measured by the DPPH, ABTS, FRAP, and CUPRAC methods. The content of gallic acid was estimated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The oldest nalewkas (from 1997) showed significantly lower antioxidant activity as well as a lower content of polyphenols, anthocyanins, and gallic acid compared to the later-produced nalewkas, in particular those produced in 2016–2019. In most cases, a correlation was also found between the parameters of antioxidant activity as well as the total content of polyphenols and anthocyanins. Long-term storage of nalewkas reduces the content of valuable secondary metabolites responsible for the antioxidant activity and, thus, the health properties of the beverage. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 289 KiB  
Article
Spirulina Supplements as a Source of Mineral Nutrients in the Daily Diet
by Katarzyna Janda-Milczarek, Kinga Szymczykowska, Karolina Jakubczyk, Patrycja Kupnicka, Karolina Skonieczna-Żydecka, Bogumiła Pilarczyk, Agnieszka Tomza-Marciniak, Alicja Ligenza, Ewa Stachowska and Bartosz Dalewski
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(2), 1011; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13021011 - 11 Jan 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 5198
Abstract
Spirulina is a microalga cultivated in many countries. It is a source of valuable protein, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, antioxidants and elements. We have not found studies that address the effect of supplement form or cultivation method on the mineral content of spirulina [...] Read more.
Spirulina is a microalga cultivated in many countries. It is a source of valuable protein, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, antioxidants and elements. We have not found studies that address the effect of supplement form or cultivation method on the mineral content of spirulina supplements. The aim of this study was to determine whether supplement form (tablet and powder) and cultivation method (organic and conventional) of spirulina have a bearing on the mineral nutrients content. Such an approach accounts for the innovation of our research. The material used in the study was spirulina in tablets and powder form, marketed as a dietary supplement. Samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). In turn, selenium (Se) content was determined by spectrofluorimetry. Overall, in terms of mean values, the most abundant mineral in spirulina supplements was phosphorus (P) (15,149 mg/kg) and the least abundant was Se (0.31 mg/kg). Our findings show that both supplement form and cultivation method affect the mineral content of spirulina. Supplements in powder form had a significantly higher content of important elements, such as iron (Fe) (673 mg/kg), magnesium (Mg) (4151 mg/kg) and potassium (K) (16,686 mg/kg), while at the same time containing significantly less sodium (Na) (9868 mg/kg). In terms of the cultivation method, organic spirulina supplements turned out to be a richer dietary source of Fe (703 mg/kg) and K (14,893 mg/kg). In turn, conventionally grown supplements had higher contents of calcium (Ca) (11,269 mg/kg), phosphorus (P) (16,314 mg/kg) and strontium (Sr) (47 mg/kg). Spirulina can therefore be a valuable addition to the daily diet, helping people to achieve the required intake of micronutrients. Full article
Back to TopTop