Special Issue "Biomedical Signal Processing: From a Conceptual Framework to Clinical Applications"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dinesh K. Kumar Website E-Mail
Electrical and Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
Interests: biomedical signal processing; EMG; retina image analysis; thermal imaging; hyperspectral imaging
Guest Editor
Dr. Sridhar Arjunan Website E-Mail
Biosignals Lab, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia
Interests: Bio-signal processing; biomedical engineering; surface electromyography; myoelectric control; muscle fatigue.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomedical signals analysis has become an important process to provide meaningful information for various applications in physiology, age-related disorders, neurological disorders, sports medicine and human–computer interface. Many researchers have reported various novel algorithms and techniques to analyse biomedical signals such as ECG, EMG and EEG that deliver useful outcomes for various clinical decisions. Currently, many studies are reported in a conceptual framework and there is a need for these frameworks to be applied in real-time clinical applications. The main objective of this Special Issue is to report the current research framework and outcomes in biomedical signal processing which has led to the clinical decisions and real-time applications. We invite research papers that explain the methods, techniques, and mathematical algorithms for analysis of biomedical signals in various clinical applications.

Prof. Dr. Dinesh K. Kumar
Dr. Sridhar Arjunan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Smartphone-Based Point-of-Care Cholesterol Blood Test Performance Evaluation Compared with a Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Method
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(16), 3334; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9163334 - 14 Aug 2019
Abstract
Managing blood cholesterol levels is important for the treatment and prevention of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. An easy-to-use, portable cholesterol blood test could accelerate more frequent testing by patients and at-risk populations. We aim to evaluate the performance of smartphone-based point-of-care cholesterol [...] Read more.
Managing blood cholesterol levels is important for the treatment and prevention of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. An easy-to-use, portable cholesterol blood test could accelerate more frequent testing by patients and at-risk populations. We aim to evaluate the performance of smartphone-based point-of-care cholesterol blood tests compared to that of hospital-grade laboratory tests. We used smartphone systems that are already familiar to many people. Because smartphone systems can be carried around everywhere, blood can be measured easily and frequently. We compared the results of cholesterol tests with those of existing clinical diagnostic laboratory methods. We found that smartphone-based point-of-care lipid blood tests were as accurate as hospital-grade laboratory tests (N = 116, R > 0.97, p < 0.001 for all three cholesterol blood tests, i.e., total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein, and triglyceride). Our system could be useful for those who need to manage blood cholesterol levels to motivate them to track and control their behavior. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Influence of Horseback Riding and Horse Simulator Riding on Heart Rate Variability: Are There Differences?
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(11), 2194; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9112194 - 29 May 2019
Abstract
This study aimed to compare the heart rate variability (HRV) in healthy young people while riding a real horse or a horse gait simulator. The sample consisted of a group of 23 healthy young adults aged 22.91 (2.37), who rode a horse for [...] Read more.
This study aimed to compare the heart rate variability (HRV) in healthy young people while riding a real horse or a horse gait simulator. The sample consisted of a group of 23 healthy young adults aged 22.91 (2.37), who rode a horse for five minutes at walking speed and spent five minutes on a horse gait simulator, while their HRV values were being recorded. Furthermore, immediately after each protocol, the HRV at rest was also recorded to observe the acute effects. We used the paired samples t-test to compare between the HRV during the horse-riding and the horse simulator-riding activities, as well as the differences in the acute effects between both situations. The findings indicate that the HRV was lower when participants were riding the horse compared with the activity on the horse simulator. However, no differences were observed immediately after the two protocols. Therefore, we state that the sympathetic tone is higher while riding a real horse than while riding a horse simulator. These differences may be due to emotional aspects and not due to differences in the physical load, considering the absence of differences in the acute effects. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Duration of the Symptoms and Brain Aging in Women with Fibromyalgia: A Cross-Sectional Study
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(10), 2106; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9102106 - 23 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Fibromyalgia is a chronic syndrome that is characterized by widespread pain and an altered brain dynamic. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the duration of the symptoms on the cortical activity of women with fibromyalgia using electroencephalogram power [...] Read more.
Fibromyalgia is a chronic syndrome that is characterized by widespread pain and an altered brain dynamic. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the duration of the symptoms on the cortical activity of women with fibromyalgia using electroencephalogram power spectrum analyses in an eye-closed resting state. Twenty-nine women participated in this cross-sectional study (N: 29; age: 55.59 [9.50]). Theta, alpha, beta-1, beta-2, and beta-3 frequency bands were analyzed using EEGLAB. Theta power significantly correlated with the duration of the symptoms, but not with age. In addition, participants were divided into two groups according to number the years for which they were suffering from fibromyalgia. Participants who had a longer duration of symptoms obtained higher theta power in the frontal (Fp1, F4, F7, F8, and Fz), central (C3, C4, and Cz), and parietal (P3 and Pz) areas than those who had a shorter duration of symptoms, which may be related to brain aging. This exploratory study demonstrates for the first time that the frontal, central, and parietal areas may be influenced by the years in which they were suffering from the symptoms of fibromyalgia. This might indicate that the duration of these symptoms may have a higher impact on brain aging than the actual age of the patient. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
What Do We Know about the Use of EEG Monitoring during Equine Anesthesia: A Review
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(18), 3678; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9183678 - 05 Sep 2019
Abstract
Electroencephalography is a noninvasive method used for the measurement of central nervous system bioelectrical activity. Besides its use for neurological disorders diagnostics in humans and animals, it was found to be useful as a part of the anesthetic monitoring. Introducing the electroencephalography (EEG) [...] Read more.
Electroencephalography is a noninvasive method used for the measurement of central nervous system bioelectrical activity. Besides its use for neurological disorders diagnostics in humans and animals, it was found to be useful as a part of the anesthetic monitoring. Introducing the electroencephalography (EEG) measurement intraoperatively in humans and in animals, due to its high specificity and sensitivity (limited number of wave patterns and high number of variabilities influencing them), with comparison to cardiovascular parameters might significantly increase the quality of anesthesia. The use of EEG during equine anesthesia may help to maintain a proper depth of anesthesia in this species. Due to the fact that EEG analyzers were designed for humans, there are still limitations of their use in horses, and different methods of analysis are studied. The paper introduces the physiology of EEG, its use in animals during anesthesia, and specification for horses. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Xiaojun Yu

Title: Motor Imagery EEG Signals Classification Based on Mode Amplitude and Frequency Components Using Empirical Wavelet Transform

2. Yousef Qawqzeh

Title:A New Photoplethysmographic index (Dpp) For the Prediction of Diabetic's Type II

3. Daniel Collado-Mateo

Title:Influence of horseback riding and horse simulator riding on heart rate variability: are there differences?

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