Special Issue "Biocompatible Materials"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Giovanni Vozzi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Center "E. Piaggio", Department of Information Engineering, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, 56122 Pisa, Italy
Interests: bioengineering; biomedical engineering; tissue engineering; microfabrication; bioreactors for tissue culture; microactuators fabrication
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to announce an upcoming Special Issue focusing on biocompatible materials. It my pleasure to invite you and members of your research team to submit an article for this Special Issue.

Biocompatible material is now defined as a substance, or a combination of substances, which has been engineered and processed to interact with components of living systems with an appropriate response in a specific application.

We invite authors to contribute original research or reviews describing detailed experimental studies, investigations and novel developments dealing with important issues facing the synthesis, design, fabrication and characterization of biocompatible material for clinical applications, including, but without being limited to diagnosis, therapies, regenerative medicine and implantable devices.

Prof. Dr. Giovanni Vozzi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomaterials
  • Regenerative Medicine
  • Medical Devices
  • Drug Delivery
  • Medical Devices
  • Diagnostic Systems

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Immobilization of Detonation Nanodiamonds on Macroscopic Surfaces
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(6), 1064; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9061064 - 13 Mar 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1242
Abstract
Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) are a novel class of carbon-based nanomaterials, and have received a great deal of attention in biomedical applications, due to their high biocompatibility, facile surface functionalization, and commercialized synthetic fabrication. We were able to transfer the NDs from large-size agglomerate [...] Read more.
Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) are a novel class of carbon-based nanomaterials, and have received a great deal of attention in biomedical applications, due to their high biocompatibility, facile surface functionalization, and commercialized synthetic fabrication. We were able to transfer the NDs from large-size agglomerate suspensions to homogenous coatings. ND suspensions have been used in various techniques to coat on commercially available substrates of pure Ti and Si. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging and nanoindentation show that the densest and strongest coating of NDs was generated when using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS)-mediated coupling to macroscopic silanized surfaces. In the next step, the feasibility of DNA-mediated coupling of NDs on macroscopic surfaces is discussed using fluorescent microscopy and additional particle size distribution, as well as zeta potential measurements. This work compares different ND coating strategies and describes the straightforward technique of grafting single-stranded DNA onto carboxylated NDs via thioester bridges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocompatible Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
Cartilage Differentiation of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Three-Dimensional Silica Nonwoven Fabrics
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(8), 1398; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8081398 - 18 Aug 2018
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1986
Abstract
In cartilage tissue engineering, three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds provide native extracellular matrix (ECM) environments that induce tissue ingrowth and ECM deposition for in vitro and in vivo tissue regeneration. In this report, we investigated 3D silica nonwoven fabrics (Cellbed®) as a scaffold [...] Read more.
In cartilage tissue engineering, three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds provide native extracellular matrix (ECM) environments that induce tissue ingrowth and ECM deposition for in vitro and in vivo tissue regeneration. In this report, we investigated 3D silica nonwoven fabrics (Cellbed®) as a scaffold for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in cartilage tissue engineering applications. The unique, highly porous microstructure of 3D silica fabrics allows for immediate cell infiltration for tissue repair and orientation of cell–cell interaction. It is expected that the morphological similarity of silica fibers to that of fibrillar ECM contributes to the functionalization of cells. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were cultured in 3D silica fabrics, and chondrogenic differentiation was induced by culture in chondrogenic differentiation medium. The characteristics of chondrogenic differentiation including cellular growth, ECM deposition of glycosaminoglycan and collagen, and gene expression were evaluated. Because of the highly interconnected network structure, stiffness, and permeability of the 3D silica fabrics, the level of chondrogenesis observed in MSCs seeded within was comparable to that observed in MSCs maintained on atelocollagen gels, which are widely used to study the chondrogenesis of MSCs in vitro and in vivo. These results indicated that 3D silica nonwoven fabrics are a promising scaffold for the regeneration of articular cartilage defects using MSCs, showing the particular importance of high elasticity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocompatible Materials)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Current Biomedical Applications of 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(8), 1713; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9081713 - 25 Apr 2019
Cited by 54 | Viewed by 4011
Abstract
Additive manufacturing (AM) has emerged over the past four decades as a cost-effective, on-demand modality for fabrication of geometrically complex objects. The ability to design and print virtually any object shape using a diverse array of materials, such as metals, polymers, ceramics and [...] Read more.
Additive manufacturing (AM) has emerged over the past four decades as a cost-effective, on-demand modality for fabrication of geometrically complex objects. The ability to design and print virtually any object shape using a diverse array of materials, such as metals, polymers, ceramics and bioinks, has allowed for the adoption of this technology for biomedical applications in both research and clinical settings. Current advancements in tissue engineering and regeneration, therapeutic delivery, medical device fabrication and operative management planning ensure that AM will continue to play an increasingly important role in the future of healthcare. In this review, we outline current biomedical applications of common AM techniques and materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocompatible Materials)
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Open AccessReview
The Evolution of Tissue Engineered Vascular Graft Technologies: From Preclinical Trials to Advancing Patient Care
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(7), 1274; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9071274 - 27 Mar 2019
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 1843
Abstract
Currently available synthetic grafts have contributed to improved outcomes in cardiovascular surgery. However, the implementation of these graft materials at small diameters have demonstrated poor patency, inhibiting their use for coronary artery bypass surgery in adults. Additionally, when applied to a pediatric patient [...] Read more.
Currently available synthetic grafts have contributed to improved outcomes in cardiovascular surgery. However, the implementation of these graft materials at small diameters have demonstrated poor patency, inhibiting their use for coronary artery bypass surgery in adults. Additionally, when applied to a pediatric patient population, they are handicapped by their lack of growth ability. Tissue engineered alternatives could possibly address these limitations by producing biocompatible implants with the ability to repair, remodel, grow, and regenerate. A tissue engineered vascular graft (TEVG) generally consists of a scaffold, seeded cells, and the appropriate environmental cues (i.e., growth factors, physical stimulation) to induce tissue formation. This review critically appraises current state-of-the-art techniques for vascular graft production. We additionally examine current graft shortcomings and future prospects, as they relate to cardiovascular surgery, from two major clinical trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocompatible Materials)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
A Review on Biomaterials for 3D Conductive Scaffolds for Stimulating and Monitoring Cellular Activities
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(5), 961; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9050961 - 07 Mar 2019
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 1599
Abstract
During the last years, scientific research in biotechnology has been reporting a considerable boost forward due to many advances marked in different technological areas. Researchers working in the field of regenerative medicine, mechanobiology and pharmacology have been constantly looking for non-invasive methods able [...] Read more.
During the last years, scientific research in biotechnology has been reporting a considerable boost forward due to many advances marked in different technological areas. Researchers working in the field of regenerative medicine, mechanobiology and pharmacology have been constantly looking for non-invasive methods able to track tissue development, monitor biological processes and check effectiveness in treatments. The possibility to control cell cultures and quantify their products represents indeed one of the most promising and exciting hurdles. In this perspective, the use of conductive materials able to map cell activity in a three-dimensional environment represents the most interesting approach. The greatest potential of this strategy relies on the possibility to correlate measurable changes in electrical parameters with specific cell cycle events, without affecting their maturation process and considering a physiological-like setting. Up to now, several conductive materials has been identified and validated as possible solutions in scaffold development, but still few works have stressed the possibility to use conductive scaffolds for non-invasive electrical cell monitoring. In this picture, the main objective of this review was to define the state-of-the-art concerning conductive biomaterials to provide researchers with practical guidelines for developing specific applications addressing cell growth and differentiation monitoring. Therefore, a comprehensive review of all the available conductive biomaterials (polymers, carbon-based, and metals) was given in terms of their main electric characteristics and range of applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocompatible Materials)
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Open AccessReview
Marine Gelatine from Rest Raw Materials
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(12), 2407; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8122407 - 27 Nov 2018
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 1374
Abstract
In recent years, demand for consumption of marine foods, and especially fish, has substantially increased worldwide. The majority of collagen available is sourced from mammalian-derived products. Although fish derived gelatine is a viable alternative to mammalian sourced gelatine, there are certain limitations related [...] Read more.
In recent years, demand for consumption of marine foods, and especially fish, has substantially increased worldwide. The majority of collagen available is sourced from mammalian-derived products. Although fish derived gelatine is a viable alternative to mammalian sourced gelatine, there are certain limitations related to the use of fish gelatine that include odour, colour, functional properties, and consistency in its amino acid composition. Chemicals used for pre-treatment, as well as extraction conditions such as temperature and time, can influence the length of polypeptide chains that result and the functional properties of the gelatine. Compared to traditional sources, gelatines derived from fish show significant differences in chemical and physical properties, and great care should be paid to optimization of the production process in order to obtain a product with the best properties for intended applications. The focus of this review is to explore the feasibility of producing gelatine sourced from marine processing by-products using different pre-treatment and extraction strategies with the aim of improving the techno-functional properties of the final product and improving the clean-label status of gelatines. The bioactivities of gelatine hydrolysates are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocompatible Materials)
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Other

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Open AccessBrief Report
3D Printed Antibacterial Prostheses
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(9), 1651; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8091651 - 14 Sep 2018
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 9316
Abstract
The purpose of the current investigation was two-fold: (i) to describe the development of 3D printed prostheses using antibacterial filaments and (ii) to verify the antibacterial properties of the 3D printed prostheses. Three-dimensional printed finger prostheses were manufactured using PLACTIVETM antibacterial 3D [...] Read more.
The purpose of the current investigation was two-fold: (i) to describe the development of 3D printed prostheses using antibacterial filaments and (ii) to verify the antibacterial properties of the 3D printed prostheses. Three-dimensional printed finger prostheses were manufactured using PLACTIVETM antibacterial 3D printing filaments. Two adults with left index finger amputations at the proximal phalanx were fitted with a customized 3D printed finger prosthesis manufactured with an antibacterial filament. The manual gross dexterity was assessed during the Box and Block Test. Patient satisfaction was assessed using the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology (QUEST 2.0). Bacterial analysis of the 3D printed prostheses was performed by two independent laboratories against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli (ISO 22196). Two customized 3D printed partial finger prostheses were manufactured using a 3D printed antibacterial filament. The bacterial analysis showed that PLACTIVETM with 1% antibacterial nanoparticles additives was up to 99.99% effective against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The manual gross dexterity assessed was improved after using the 3D printed partial finger prosthesis. The research subjects indicated that they were “quite satisfied” to “very satisfied” with the 3D printed partial finger prosthesis. The present investigation showed that the antibacterial 3D printed filament can be used for the development of functional and effective antibacterial finger prostheses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocompatible Materials)
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