Special Issue "Safety and Quality of Food of Animal Origin"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Claudia Maria Balzaretti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety (VESPA), Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 10, 20133 Milano, Italy
Interests: food inspection; quality system; safety of agri-food chain; control systems for food safety
Dr. Marta Castrica
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Health, Animal Science and Food Safety (VESPA), Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 10, 20133 Milano, Italy
Interests: food quality control; food microbiology; food security; sustainability of food of animal origin
Dr. Laura Menchetti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Science, University of Perugia, Via San Costanzo 4, 06126 Perugia, Italy
Interests: animal physiology; biostatistics; animal production; rabbit; behavior; nutritional and metabolic diseases; animal models.
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Dino Miraglia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Perugia, Via San Costanzo 4, 06126 Perugia, Italy
Interests: meat quality; food hygiene and safety; food microbiology; natural antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds
Prof. Dr. Luigi Bonizzi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 10, 20133 Milano, Italy
Interests: veterinary microbiology and immunology; infectious diseases of veterinary interest; zoonoses; one health; food quality and safety

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are inviting the submission of reviews and original research papers that present basic and applied research into the safety and quality of food of animal origin.

The safety and quality of food of animal origin for human consumption has become an essential part of the public health debate. At the international level, the principles of equivalence, harmonization, transparency of food safety systems and risk assessment methods based on these principles are of fundamental importance. In order to minimize the risks and to prevent foodborne hazards of animal origin, a “from farm to fork” approach is required for all stages of the food chain.

In recent years, public concern about the safety of foods of animal origin has heightened due to problems arising from BSE, dioxin contamination, outbreaks of foodborne bacterial infections, veterinary drug residues, and antimicrobial resistance, and reviews and original articles dealing with these topics are welcome.

Moreover, any kind of contribution to intelligent and active packaging that can extend the shelf life of food of animal origin, scientific studies on rapid and smart diagnostic devices to be used onsite for preliminary health profile assessments are also welcome.

Also appreciated are original articles about sustainable chains which enhance local animal products and new integrated approaches that can allow a safe recovery of food of animal origin in the third sector (charitable organizations) ensuring, in the recovery chain, the application of correct hygiene procedures for social solidarity purposes.

Dr. Claudia Maria Balzaretti
Dr. Marta Castrica
Dr. Laura Menchetti
Dr. Dino Miraglia
Prof. Dr. Luigi Bonizzi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food supply chain integration
  • safety of food of animal origin
  • quality assurance
  • public health
  • innovative and active packaging
  • smart diagnostic device
  • sustainable food supply chain
  • food safety in the food recovery chain

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Methylglyoxal (MGO) in Italian Honey
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(2), 831; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11020831 - 17 Jan 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 420
Abstract
Methylglyoxal (MGO) is recognized as being the bioactive component responsible for the antibacterial activity of mānuka honey. MGO content was investigated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-UV), in isocratic elution, to assess the occurrence of this compound in mono- and multi-floral honey samples representative [...] Read more.
Methylglyoxal (MGO) is recognized as being the bioactive component responsible for the antibacterial activity of mānuka honey. MGO content was investigated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-UV), in isocratic elution, to assess the occurrence of this compound in mono- and multi-floral honey samples representative of different botanical and geographic origins in Italy. Specifically, 110 honey samples from sweet cherry tree (Prunus avium L.), thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), almond tree (Prunus amygdalus L.), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis L.), coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), cornflower (Centaurea cyanus L.), thistle (Silybum marianum L.), acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia L.), citrus, honeydew and multifloral honey were considered. The amount of MGO found in different types of honey was ranging from 0.4 to 24.1 mg/kg. This study provides, for the first time, data on MGO levels in Italian cherry and almond honey, which showed higher concentrations of MGO compared to honeys from other botanical species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Safety and Quality of Food of Animal Origin)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Antibacterial Effect of an Active Absorbent Pad on Fresh Beef Meat during the Shelf-Life: Preliminary Results
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(21), 7904; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10217904 - 07 Nov 2020
Viewed by 475
Abstract
Nowadays, active packaging plays a key role in the food sector, improving the safety and quality of food and, at the same time, extending its shelf life. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy that an active absorbent pad has [...] Read more.
Nowadays, active packaging plays a key role in the food sector, improving the safety and quality of food and, at the same time, extending its shelf life. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy that an active absorbent pad has in limiting microbial growth during the shelf-life of fresh bovine meat. The experiment was carried out on 50 slices of eye of round (semitendinosus muscle) of an adult bovine, packaged in two different packs, one containing the conventional pad (C: Control group) and the other containing the active pad (PAD group). The analyses, performed at 0, 3 and 6 days of refrigeration storage (4 °C), concerned the pH, color, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVBN) and microbiological parameters. The packaging with the active pad had no noticeable effect on the pH, but with regard to the color coordinates, the meat at day 6 was lighter than the control group (p < 0.01). The innovative pad was able to delay the growth of all the microorganisms investigated, but only at day 3 (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001) compared to the control group. Furthermore, the TVBN values were lower than the control ones at both the third (p = 0.036) and sixth (p < 0.01) day of analysis. All samples were negative for coagulase positive staphylococci, L. monocytogenes, and Salmonella spp. In conclusion, following a preliminary examination, the packaging with the active pad was potentially effective in delaying microbial growth and it positively affected the color and TVBN of beef meat. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Safety and Quality of Food of Animal Origin)
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Open AccessArticle
Impacts of Killing Process on the Nutrient Content, Product Stability and In Vitro Digestibility of Black Soldier Fly (Hermetia illucens) Larvae Meals
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(17), 6099; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10176099 - 02 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 677
Abstract
The black soldier fly (BSF, Hermetia illucens) is considered a potential sustainable insect alternative source of protein for animal feed. The quality of a BSF meal is greatly influenced by the killing method and the purpose of this article is to compare [...] Read more.
The black soldier fly (BSF, Hermetia illucens) is considered a potential sustainable insect alternative source of protein for animal feed. The quality of a BSF meal is greatly influenced by the killing method and the purpose of this article is to compare the influences of different killing methods. BSFs at the 18-day-old prepupae stage were separated into six different killing methods with three replicates: 1. blending, 2. freezing, 3. CO2 treatment, 4. vacuum, 5. blanching and 6. CO2 plus blanching. After killing, BSF larvae meals were obtained by hot air oven drying and grinding. The chemical composition and in vitro digestibility calculated from sediments were not affected by the killing method, except that blending provided the worst BSF quality for all measured parameters (p < 0.05). The highest quality of BSF was obtained from the heat treatment procedures (blanching and the CO2 plus blanching methods), as they produced lower acidity after killing, total viable counts, browning reaction (enzymatic and non-enzymatic), darkness, moisture, fat acidity, protein and lipid oxidation during storage compared with other killing procedures (p < 0.05). Interestingly, the highest free amino acids in the supernatant after in vitro digestibility of BSF samples was observed with the CO2 plus blanching killing method (p < 0.05), whereas other parameters were similar to those obtained with blanching. The CO2 plus blanching method did not produce clearly different outcomes to blanching; therefore, the selection of one of these techniques over the other should depend on the regulations in each country. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Safety and Quality of Food of Animal Origin)
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Open AccessArticle
Norovirus Detection in Ready-To-Eat Salads by Propidium Monoazide Real Time RT-PCR Assay
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(15), 5176; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10155176 - 28 Jul 2020
Viewed by 495
Abstract
Ready-to-eat (RTE) salads have recently been associated with food-borne norovirus outbreaks, although these infections are mainly related to shellfish and berry consumption in the EU. A total of 135 bagged RTE vegetables were analyzed in order to investigate the occurrence of norovirus (NoV) [...] Read more.
Ready-to-eat (RTE) salads have recently been associated with food-borne norovirus outbreaks, although these infections are mainly related to shellfish and berry consumption in the EU. A total of 135 bagged RTE vegetables were analyzed in order to investigate the occurrence of norovirus (NoV) genotype I (GI) and II (GII) RNA and to differentiate between infectious and non-infectious viruses by using propidium monoazide (PMAxx) coupled with the real time Reverse Transcription (RT) PCR method. Initially, the PMAxx real time RT-PCR assay was optimized on NoV GI and GII suspensions, and proved capable of detecting significant (p < 0.05) differences between infectious and inactivated viruses. Our analysis conducted on RTE salads samples showed the presence of norovirus GII in 74.8% of samples, of which 37.6% were infectious. The samples tested for viral contamination came from only two RTE vegetable-processing plants. The findings in this study could also be due to virally-contaminated water used in food production, processing, or preparation. This study stresses the need for effective real-time RT-PCR tools capable of qualitative and quantitative detection of NoV RNA, as well as being able to measure virus infectivity, for risk assessment, which is crucial in several public health measures and food regulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Safety and Quality of Food of Animal Origin)
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Open AccessArticle
Listeria Monocytogenes in Soft Spreadable Salami: Study of the Pathogen Behavior and Growth Prediction During Manufacturing Process and Shelf Life
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(13), 4438; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10134438 - 27 Jun 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 600
Abstract
Recently, particular attention has been addressed to the control of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat meat products, such as fermented salami, as a consequence of several listeriosis outbreaks associated with the consumption of these types of products. A short-ripened spreadable salami, typically produced in [...] Read more.
Recently, particular attention has been addressed to the control of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat meat products, such as fermented salami, as a consequence of several listeriosis outbreaks associated with the consumption of these types of products. A short-ripened spreadable salami, typically produced in the Umbria region (Central Italy), was challenged with L. monocytogenes aiming to evaluate the pathogen’s growth dynamics and to define its growth potential during processing and storage time. The pathogen counts were stable in the inoculum level (2 Log CFU/g) during the production process and up to 30 days of storage time, decreasing thereafter. The growth potentials registered for process phase and storage time were 0.40 and −1.28, showing that the application of the hurdles technology principle successfully creates an unfavorable environment for L. monocytogenes growth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Safety and Quality of Food of Animal Origin)
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