Special Issue "Lipid Oxidation in Meat and Poultry"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Dong Uk Ahn

Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Oxidation mechanisms, antioxidants, prevention of oxidation, functional peptides

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lipid oxidation is one of the major factors affecting the quality of meat and poultry. Numerous works on lipid oxidation, which include internal and external factors affecting lipid oxidation, mechanisms involved, prevention methods, and sensory characteristics of the products. Oxidized meat products not only influence the eating quality of the products but also is considered to have harmful effects to the health of humans by influencing the oxidative stress of the body. Recent studies also indicated that various stresses to animal can have significant impact to the susceptibility of meat to oxidative changes. Dietary antioxidants, oxidation status of dietary fats, and supplementation of certain minerals are closely related to the oxidative status of animal body. This Special Issue will publish both reviews and original research papers on the roles of dietary antioxidants, oxidative status of dietary fats and composition of dietary fats on the oxidative stresses of animal body, the performance of animals, and the quality of meat. The effects of external stresses on protein oxidation and its influence on meat quality, prevention measures of lipid oxidation during processing and storage, use natural antioxidants including antioxidant proteins and peptides, phenolic compounds and packaging strategies to prevent lipid oxidation in meat and poultry will be included.

Professor Dong Uk Ahn
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • natural antioxidants
  • antioxidant proteins and peptides
  • dietary fat
  • dietary antioxidants
  • protein oxidation
  • oxidative stress
  • mechanisms of lipid oxidation
  • animal productivity
  • prevention of lipid oxidation
  • pro-oxidants
  • processing processes
  • packaging
  • additives
  • storage
  • meat quality
  • sensory characteristics

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle In Vitro Investigation of Six Antioxidants for Pig Diets
Antioxidants 2016, 5(4), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox5040041
Received: 7 August 2016 / Revised: 3 October 2016 / Accepted: 2 November 2016 / Published: 11 November 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1417 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Oxidative stress in the small intestinal epithelium can lead to barrier malfunction. In this study, the effect of rosmarinic acid (RA), quercetin (Que), gallic acid (GA), lipoic acid (LA), ethoxyquin (ETQ) and Se-methionine (SeMet) pre-treatments using 2 mM Trolox as a control on [...] Read more.
Oxidative stress in the small intestinal epithelium can lead to barrier malfunction. In this study, the effect of rosmarinic acid (RA), quercetin (Que), gallic acid (GA), lipoic acid (LA), ethoxyquin (ETQ) and Se-methionine (SeMet) pre-treatments using 2 mM Trolox as a control on the viability and the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS) of oxidatively (H2O2) stressed intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) was investigated. A neutral red assay showed that RA (50–400 µM), Que (12.5–200 µM), GA (50–400 µM), ETQ (6.25–100 µM), and SeMet (125–1000 µM) pre-treatments but not LA significantly increased the viability of H2O2-stressed IPEC-J2 cells (p < 0.05). A 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, acetyl ester (CM-H2DCFDA) fluorescent probe showed that RA (100–600 µM), Que (25–800 µM), ETQ (3.125–100 µM) and SeMet (500–2000 µM) pre-treatments significantly reduced iROS in IPEC-J2 monolayers (p < 0.05). Moreover, RA and Que were most effective in reducing iROS. Therefore, the effects of RA and Que on barrier functioning in vitro were examined. RA and Que pre-treatments significantly decreased fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated dextran-4 (4 kDa) permeability and transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of an IPEC-J2 cell monolayer (p < 0.05). These in vitro results of RA and Que hold promise for their use as antioxidants in pig feed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lipid Oxidation in Meat and Poultry)
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Open AccessArticle Antioxidant Effect of Extracts from the Coffee Residue in Raw and Cooked Meat
Antioxidants 2016, 5(3), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox5030021
Received: 30 April 2016 / Revised: 22 June 2016 / Accepted: 24 June 2016 / Published: 4 July 2016
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (212 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The residue of ground coffee obtained after the brewing process (spent coffee) still contains various functional components with high antioxidant capacity and health benefits, but no attempts have been made to use it as a resource to produce value-added food ingredients. This study [...] Read more.
The residue of ground coffee obtained after the brewing process (spent coffee) still contains various functional components with high antioxidant capacity and health benefits, but no attempts have been made to use it as a resource to produce value-added food ingredients. This study evaluates the antioxidant activity of ethanol or hot water extracts from the residues of coffee after brewing. An extraction experiment was carried out using the conventional solid–liquid methods, including ethanol and water as the extraction media at different temperatures and liquid/solid ratios. The antioxidant activity of extracts was tested for total phenolic compound (TPC), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) using oil emulsion and raw/cooked meat systems. The DPPH radical scavenging activity of the ethanol extracts with heating (HEE) and without heating (CEE) were higher than that of the hot water extracts (WE). The highest DPPH value of HEE and CEE at 1000 ppm was 91.22% and 90.21%, respectively. In oil emulsion and raw/cooked systems, both the water and ethanol extracts had similar antioxidant effects to the positive control (BHA), but HEE and CEE extracts showed stronger antioxidant activities than WE extract. These results indicated that the ethanol extracts of coffee residue have a strong antioxidant activity and have the potential to be used as a natural antioxidant in meat. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lipid Oxidation in Meat and Poultry)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Tannic Acid on Lipid and Protein Oxidation, Color, and Volatiles of Raw and Cooked Chicken Breast Meat during Storage
Antioxidants 2016, 5(2), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox5020019
Received: 28 April 2016 / Revised: 2 June 2016 / Accepted: 4 June 2016 / Published: 13 June 2016
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (225 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The objective of this study was to determine the effect of tannic acid (TA) on the oxidative stability and the quality characteristics of ground chicken breast meat. Five treatments including (1) control (none added), (2) 2.5 ppm TA, (3) 5 ppm TA, (4) [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to determine the effect of tannic acid (TA) on the oxidative stability and the quality characteristics of ground chicken breast meat. Five treatments including (1) control (none added), (2) 2.5 ppm TA, (3) 5 ppm TA, (4) 10 ppm TA, and (5) 5 ppm butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) were added to boneless, skinless ground chicken breast meat, and used for both raw and cooked meat studies. For the raw meat study, the ground chicken breast meat was packaged in oxygen-permeable bags and stored at 4 °C for 7 days. For the cooked study, raw ground meat samples were vacuum-packaged in oxygen-impermeable vacuum bags, cooked in-bag to the internal temperature of 75 °C, re-packaged in oxygen-permeable bags, and then stored. Both raw and cooked meats were analyzed for lipid and protein oxidation, color, and volatiles (cooked meat only) at 0, 3, and 7 days of storage. Raw meats with 10 ppm of TA added had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower lipid and protein oxidation than other treatments during storage. In addition, TA at 10 ppm level maintained the highest color a*- and L*-values during storage. Cooked chicken breast meat with 5 and 10 ppm TA added produced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower amounts of off-odor volatiles than other treatments. Among the volatile compounds, the amount of hexanal increased rapidly during storage for cooked meat. However, meats with 5 and 10 ppm TA added showed the lowest amount of hexanal and other aldehydes related to lipid oxidation, indicating a strong antioxidant effect of TA in cooked chicken breast meat. Furthermore, the differences in aldehydes among the treatments were bigger in cooked than in raw meat, indicating that the antioxidant effect of TA in cooked meat was greater than that in raw meat. Therefore, TA at >5 ppm can be used as a good natural preservative in cooked chicken meat to maintain its quality during storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lipid Oxidation in Meat and Poultry)
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Oregano Essential Oil (Origanum vulgare subsp. hirtum) on the Storage Stability and Quality Parameters of Ground Chicken Breast Meat
Antioxidants 2016, 5(2), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox5020018
Received: 28 April 2016 / Revised: 31 May 2016 / Accepted: 2 June 2016 / Published: 7 June 2016
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (231 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A study was conducted to investigate the effect of oregano essential oil on the oxidative stability and color of raw and cooked chicken breast meats. Five treatments, including (1) control (none added); (2) 100 ppm oregano essential oil; (3) 300 ppm oregano essential [...] Read more.
A study was conducted to investigate the effect of oregano essential oil on the oxidative stability and color of raw and cooked chicken breast meats. Five treatments, including (1) control (none added); (2) 100 ppm oregano essential oil; (3) 300 ppm oregano essential oil; (4) 400 ppm oregano essential oil; and (5) 5 ppm butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), were prepared with ground boneless, skinless chicken breast meat and used for both raw and cooked meat studies. For raw meat study, samples were individually packaged in oxygen-permeable bags and stored in a cold room (4 °C) for 7 days. For cooked meat study, the raw meat samples were vacuum-packaged in oxygen-impermeable vacuum bags and then cooked in-bag to an internal temperature of 75 °C. After cooling to room temperature, the cooked meats were repackaged in new oxygen-permeable bags and then stored at 4 °C for 7 days. Both raw and cooked meats were analyzed for lipid and protein oxidation, volatiles, and color at 0, 3, and 7 days of storage. Oregano essential oil significantly reduced (p < 0.05) lipid and protein oxidation, and improved color stability of raw and cooked meat. However, oregano oil at 400 ppm showed the strongest effect for all these parameters. Hexanal was the major aldehyde, which was decreased significantly (p < 0.05) by oregano oil treatment, in cooked meat. Overall, oregano essential oil at 100–400 ppm levels could be a good preservative that can replace the synthetic antioxidant in chicken meat. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lipid Oxidation in Meat and Poultry)
Open AccessArticle Antioxidant Efficacy of Litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) Pericarp Extract in Sheep Meat Nuggets
Antioxidants 2016, 5(2), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox5020016
Received: 12 March 2016 / Revised: 11 May 2016 / Accepted: 13 May 2016 / Published: 18 May 2016
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1098 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the present study, the efficacy of litchi fruit pericarp (LFP) extract (0.5%, 1.0% and 1.5% concentration) in retarding lipid oxidation of cooked sheep meat nuggets was evaluated and compared to butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT, 100 ppm). The total phenolic content and antioxidant [...] Read more.
In the present study, the efficacy of litchi fruit pericarp (LFP) extract (0.5%, 1.0% and 1.5% concentration) in retarding lipid oxidation of cooked sheep meat nuggets was evaluated and compared to butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT, 100 ppm). The total phenolic content and antioxidant potential of LFP extracts were determined. The thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) values were evaluated to assess the potential of LFP extracts as natural antioxidants for oxidative stability of cooked nuggets during 12 days of refrigerated storage. Results show that total phenolics content in 10 mg LFP powder was comparable to 100 ppm BHT, but 15 mg LFP powder had significantly higher (p < 0.05) total phenolics content and reducing power than the synthetic antioxidant. LFP extract did not affect pH, cooking yield and the sensory attributes of cooked nuggets. Non-treated control and nuggets with 1.0% LFP extract had significantly lower total phenolics than nuggets with 1.5% extract and BHT. TBARS values were significantly lower (p < 0.05) throughout the storage period in cooked meat nuggets containing either LFP extract or BHT than in non-treated control. Results indicate that LFP extracts are promising sources of natural antioxidants and can potentially be used as functional food additives in meat products at 1.5% without affecting products’ acceptability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lipid Oxidation in Meat and Poultry)
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Open AccessArticle Study of the Properties of Bearberry Leaf Extract as a Natural Antioxidant in Model Foods
Antioxidants 2016, 5(2), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox5020011
Received: 2 February 2016 / Revised: 22 March 2016 / Accepted: 24 March 2016 / Published: 1 April 2016
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1113 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The common bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi L. Sprengel) is a ubiquitous procumbent evergreen shrub located throughout North America, Asia, and Europe. The fruits are almost tasteless but the plant contains a high concentration of active ingredients. The antioxidant activity of bearberry leaf extract [...] Read more.
The common bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi L. Sprengel) is a ubiquitous procumbent evergreen shrub located throughout North America, Asia, and Europe. The fruits are almost tasteless but the plant contains a high concentration of active ingredients. The antioxidant activity of bearberry leaf extract in the 2,2′-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) radical cation assay was 90.42 mmol Trolox equivalents/g dry weight (DW). The scavenging ability of the methanol extract of bearberry leaves against methoxy radicals generated in the Fenton reaction was measured via electron paramagnetic resonance. Lipid oxidation was retarded in an oil–water emulsion by adding 1 g/kg lyophilised bearberry leaf extract. Also, 1 g/kg of lyophilised bearberry leaf extract incorporated into a gelatin-based film displayed high antioxidant activity to retard the degradation of lipids in muscle foods. The present results indicate the potential of bearberry leaf extract for use as a natural food antioxidant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lipid Oxidation in Meat and Poultry)
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Open AccessArticle Gelatine-Based Antioxidant Packaging Containing Caesalpinia decapetala and Tara as a Coating for Ground Beef Patties
Antioxidants 2016, 5(2), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox5020010
Received: 2 February 2016 / Revised: 10 March 2016 / Accepted: 24 March 2016 / Published: 31 March 2016
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (1811 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The development of antioxidant-active packaging has numerous advantages, such as the reduction of synthetic additives in food, the reduction of plastic waste and food protection against oxidation reactions. Different concentrations of extracts of the plants Caesalpinia decapetala (CD) and Caesalpinia spinosa “Tara” (CS) [...] Read more.
The development of antioxidant-active packaging has numerous advantages, such as the reduction of synthetic additives in food, the reduction of plastic waste and food protection against oxidation reactions. Different concentrations of extracts of the plants Caesalpinia decapetala (CD) and Caesalpinia spinosa “Tara” (CS) were incorporated into gelatine films as natural antioxidants. The physical, mechanical and antioxidant properties of these films were studied. Films containing plant extracts at a high concentration had lower tensile strength with higher elongation at break points, compared to the control film (p < 0.05). Films exhibited antioxidant activity in the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and Trolox equivalence antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assays when added at 0.2%. The application of gelatine film containing CD and CS was found to be effective in delaying lipid oxidation and deterioration of beef patty quality during storage. Therefore, the films prepared in this study offered an alternative edible coating for the preservation of fresh food. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lipid Oxidation in Meat and Poultry)
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Review

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Open AccessReview A Review of Antioxidant Peptides Derived from Meat Muscle and By-Products
Antioxidants 2016, 5(3), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox5030032
Received: 12 May 2016 / Revised: 8 September 2016 / Accepted: 9 September 2016 / Published: 20 September 2016
Cited by 26 | PDF Full-text (556 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Antioxidant peptides are gradually being accepted as food ingredients, supplemented in functional food and nutraceuticals, to positively regulate oxidative stress in the human body against lipid and protein oxidation. Meat muscle and meat by-products are rich sources of proteins and can be regarded [...] Read more.
Antioxidant peptides are gradually being accepted as food ingredients, supplemented in functional food and nutraceuticals, to positively regulate oxidative stress in the human body against lipid and protein oxidation. Meat muscle and meat by-products are rich sources of proteins and can be regarded as good materials for the production of bioactive peptides by use of enzymatic hydrolysis or direct solvent extraction. In recent years, there has been a growing number of studies conducted to characterize antioxidant peptides or hydrolysates derived from meat muscle and by-products as well as processed meat products, including dry-cured hams. Antioxidant peptides obtained from animal sources could exert not only nutritional value but also bioavailability to benefit human health. This paper reviews the antioxidant peptides or protein hydrolysates identified in muscle protein and by-products. We focus on the procedure for the generation of peptides with antioxidant capacity including the acquisition of crude peptides, the assessment of antioxidant activity, and the purification and identification of the active fraction. It remains critical to perform validation experiments with a cell model, animal model or clinical trial to eliminate safety concerns before final application in the food system. In addition, some of the common characteristics on structure-activity relationship are also reviewed based on the identified antioxidant peptides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lipid Oxidation in Meat and Poultry)
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